If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BBC)   Aww crap, we're not gonna have to switch to metric time now are we?   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 25
    More: Interesting, Atomic Clock, optical lattices, International System of Units, Paris Observatory, microwaves, metric time  
•       •       •

21679 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jul 2013 at 11:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-07-10 11:42:01 AM
4 votes:
i41.tinypic.com
2013-07-10 11:10:50 AM
4 votes:
The devices, called optical lattice clocks, lost just one second every 300 million years - making them three times as accurate as current atomic clocks.

I can't quite put my finger on why, but I don't think they tested that under real time conditions.  I think they're guessing.
2013-07-10 09:48:15 AM
4 votes:
I say we go with The Time Cube.
2013-07-10 11:28:00 AM
3 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Does anybody really know what time it is?


Time is an illusion.  Lunchtime, doubly so.
2013-07-10 10:23:20 AM
3 votes:
Does anybody really know what time it is?
2013-07-10 11:45:36 AM
2 votes:

Teaser: [i41.tinypic.com image 700x662]


Actually for temperature, Fahrenheit is more precise. 180 units of measurement between freezing and boiling point, instead of 100. That really helps when I need to know if I should wear a sweater or not.
2013-07-10 11:32:45 AM
2 votes:
img1.fark.net  The second is already an SI unit!
2013-07-10 11:22:42 AM
2 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Does anybody really know what time it is?


Twenty-five (or six) to four.
2013-07-10 06:11:40 PM
1 votes:

SewerSquirrels: Would the new clock reduce the theoretical down to under 5 ft.?


No, because most of the error in GPS is related to signal transmission -- variances in the atmosphere, the position of transmitter, etc. -- not due to variances in the clock source.

If you record the raw data and do after-the-fact corrections using measured error data (like high-precision GPS units do) a higher-accuracy clock source would give you better fixes. It might also be usable as a local time source (i.e. if you carried one with you), so you don't have to derive the "real" time from high-error data. But for practical, real-time use it won't make much difference.
2013-07-10 01:47:05 PM
1 votes:

clambam: Donnchadha: MayContainHorseGluten: Teaser: [i41.tinypic.com image 700x662]

Actually that Fahrenheit thing is wrong. 0 °F is when seawater freezes. 0 °C is freshwater.   Not arbitrary.

It's actually based on a temperature of an ammonium chloride slurry for the zero point. The freezing point of pure water was set to 32 degrees so that any "degree" mark could be identified through dividing the scale by 2 repeatedly.

Yesterday it was zero degrees F outside. Today it is twice as cold. What is the temperature?


"Twice as cold" makes no logical sense as a phrase.
2013-07-10 01:38:47 PM
1 votes:
Still no cure for the common cold.
2013-07-10 01:12:15 PM
1 votes:

Teaser: [i41.tinypic.com image 700x662]


Actually that Fahrenheit thing is wrong. 0 °F is when seawater freezes. 0 °C is freshwater.   Not arbitrary.
2013-07-10 12:19:14 PM
1 votes:

Teaser: [i41.tinypic.com image 700x662]


Year/Month/Day makes more sense than day/month/year.

Also, putting the surname before the given name (as they do in East Asia) makes more sense. None of this "Last Name, First Name, M.I." nonsense on forms, you would just write it out as you normally say it.

/senary is better than decimal, anyway.
2013-07-10 12:17:41 PM
1 votes:

ChrisDe: Teaser: [i41.tinypic.com image 700x662]

Actually for temperature, Fahrenheit is more precise. 180 units of measurement between freezing and boiling point, instead of 100. That really helps when I need to know if I should wear a sweater or not.


And why don't all these celsius proponents acknowledge that it is inferior to Kelvin? If you plan to be arbitrarily precise you might as well go all the way. And setting 100 increments between the freezing point and boiling point of water at sea level is arbitrary as well.
2013-07-10 12:07:19 PM
1 votes:
In the US, we won't switch to metric time.  Referencing the precedent of metric length, we'll teach it in all of the schools but use some half-assed hybrid.
What we ended up with is items measured in feet and inches, but fractions of inches are metric.  So you'll have a clock with 12 hours and 60 minutes, but the second hand will tick 100 times per minute.  Unless you like precision timing, in which case it will  tick 10,000 times per minute, in a measurement engineers will inexplicably call "tenths" rather "ten-thousandths"
Also, since you need 2 sets of wrenches to fix anything, I'm guessing you'll now need 2 watches and 2 wall clocks for every room.
2013-07-10 11:51:55 AM
1 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Does anybody really know what time it is?


It's five o'clock somewhere.
2013-07-10 11:48:41 AM
1 votes:

lilbjorn: The devices, called optical lattice clocks, lost just one second every 300 million years - making them three times as accurate as current atomic clocks

Oh, well by all means.  Let's spend billions of tax of dollars converting over to this new clock.


Guess how I know you don't know how GPS works?

Hint: Maybe you don't care if you are off by a second after 300 million years, but you do care if you are off by a nanosecond after a minute.
2013-07-10 11:43:31 AM
1 votes:
1.bp.blogspot.com
2013-07-10 11:39:28 AM
1 votes:

I_Am_Weasel: I think they're guessing.


No, as usual, they are not guessing.

Hint: They don't have to wait until the clock is off by a second to determine the rate of drift.
2013-07-10 11:38:46 AM
1 votes:
A time thread, and no Doctor Who references?

(Also came for Chicago and Spin Doctors... leaving 2/3 satisfied.)
2013-07-10 11:35:05 AM
1 votes:
"For instance, if you have your wristwatch, and one day you are one second late, and one day one second early, then your clock is not stable. But it could still have good accuracy if over a million days the time is correct," Dr Lodewyck explained.

My watch syncs with the atomic time service in Denver. I farking love it... It's also solar, which is nice.
2013-07-10 11:32:38 AM
1 votes:

boarch: FTA: "The devices, called optical lattice clocks, lost just one second every 300 million years - making them three times as accurate as current atomic clocks. "

They tested this-- how?


"As well as comparing the optical lattice clocks with our current atomic timekeepers, the researchers compared two optical clocks with each other. They found that they kept time in agreement, and were also very stable."
2013-07-10 11:24:06 AM
1 votes:
FTA: "The devices, called optical lattice clocks, lost just one second every 300 million years - making them three times as accurate as current atomic clocks. "

They tested this-- how?
2013-07-10 11:04:09 AM
1 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Does anybody really know what time it is?


Four thir-TAY.

It's not late, naw, naw.

It's just a-earlAY earlAY
2013-07-10 10:43:57 AM
1 votes:
Stardates
 
Displayed 25 of 25 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report