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(Bubblews)   Remember how news reporters and photographers respected FDR's disability and kept the fact he was in a wheelchair secret from the public? Yeah, well, about that   (bubblews.com) divider line 55
    More: Interesting, FDR, disability, photographers, reporters  
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13458 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jul 2013 at 8:45 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-10 08:13:17 AM
wait. now. The link doesn't even work so i have no idea what that was even about.

But (admittedly I went to Florida public schools) but from what I understood it was widely known among the American people that FDR was a in wheelchair. I don't think it was secret exactly. I think it was just the culture of the time that they didn't mention it much or emphasize it.

But really, I don't think it was a secret. I might be wrong, I'm guessing many Americans just never thought about it.
 
2013-07-10 08:16:30 AM
The dude did go up against Hitler you know, who would have probably have murdered him for his disability alone.

So yeah, I really don't think it was a good time to get all handicapped rights at that particular time. Still don't think it was a secret exactly though. I bet many Americans probably thought he could walk if he wanted to, though.
 
2013-07-10 08:17:40 AM
It was hidden from the public. My father was growing up in the 30s, they pretty much never showed him in his wheelchair as a wheelchair, just a chair. The public knew he had polio. They could figure out the rest, since a cure hadn't been developed yet.
 
2013-07-10 08:19:41 AM
Well I have a feeling that people in the 1930s and 1940s didn't exactly recoil in surprise when they encountered an older gentleman in a wheelchair, you know.
 
2013-07-10 08:20:40 AM
I think the US propaganda machine probably tried to hide it, but I doubt most Americans were surprised or even barely interested at the time.
 
2013-07-10 08:26:28 AM

Confabulat: Well I have a feeling that people in the 1930s and 1940s didn't exactly recoil in surprise when they encountered an older gentleman in a wheelchair, you know.


It was more "give the man his dignity". "No one needs to see that". Like I said, if they knew he had polio, they knew what that meant. The rest was keeping up appearances.
 
2013-07-10 08:36:30 AM
The link works fine. Don't know what you're clicking on... and as far as the average American was concerned at the time, they knew he had Polio but not that he couldn't walk at all. Events were carefully staged to make it appear he was walking with help from one of his son's or others in his circle. Many people were shocked to find out after his death he had been in a wheelchair for more than 20 years...
 
2013-07-10 08:49:59 AM
"Only the President's ability to lead is the modern requirement."

[ohwaityou'reserious.jpg]
 
2013-07-10 08:50:12 AM
Broken link.
 
2013-07-10 08:55:10 AM

PC LOAD LETTER: Confabulat: Well I have a feeling that people in the 1930s and 1940s didn't exactly recoil in surprise when they encountered an older gentleman in a wheelchair, you know.

It was more "give the man his dignity". "No one needs to see that". Like I said, if they knew he had polio, they knew what that meant. The rest was keeping up appearances.


More or less this. My great grand father told me that everyone just assumed because really if you got polio you usually lost some function of your legs. They cast it aside because he was an inspirational leader through his voice on the radio.
 
2013-07-10 08:55:10 AM
It was a kinder, gentler time. People knew to play down or try to ignore the shame of being disabled. Now people pretend it's not a negative, and loudly flaunt their handicap and demand others' lifestyles adjust to them.
 
2013-07-10 08:58:26 AM
They kept this secret, too:

cf2.imgobject.com
 
2013-07-10 09:00:26 AM
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com

I'll give you $1000 for it, it is only 8 seconds long.
 
2013-07-10 09:00:49 AM
It's a shame. Today he would have been treated with reverence & respect:
cdn2-b.examiner.com
 
2013-07-10 09:02:34 AM
unoriginal meme and the article pretty much refutes Subby's crappy tagline

1 Internet Fail for subby
 
2013-07-10 09:04:39 AM
The fact that FDR wasn't Presidentin' from inside an iron lung is a miracle in of itself.
 
2013-07-10 09:07:19 AM

doubled99: It was a kinder, gentler time. People knew to play down or try to ignore the shame of being disabled. Now people pretend it's not a negative, and loudly flaunt their handicap and demand others' lifestyles adjust to them.


Really? Tell it to the people of Berlin, London, Dresden, Coventry, Tokyo, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, etc. just how kind and gentle it was. Yes, we were at war but just try to imagine the epic shiatstorm that would erupt today if the U.S. military tried mass fire-bombings of civilian population centers.
 
2013-07-10 09:08:29 AM
What about when he got the news of Pearl Harbor and was so shocked he got up out of his wheelchair?
 
2013-07-10 09:09:10 AM
I clicked on the link. I got a 15 second ad for an insurance company, then about 5 seconds of someone who may or may not have been FDR, moving through a crowd in what may or may not have been a wheelchair.

Then I had to spend another two minutes writing this message to express my outrage.

Once again, the Internet has wasted my time.
 
2013-07-10 09:11:24 AM

give me doughnuts: Really? Tell it to the people of Berlin, London, Dresden, Coventry, Tokyo, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, etc. just how kind and gentle it was. Yes, we were at war but just try to imagine the epic shiatstorm that would erupt today if the U.S. military tried mass fire-bombings of civilian population centers.


We've gotten more precision weaponry since then, but I will point you to the second battle at Fallujah where we would fire M1 Abrams HE rounds into homes to create distraction cover fire for Marine squads.

We uh...kinda killed a lot of people there and just claimed because they were helping the insurgency that they were combatants.
 
2013-07-10 09:12:29 AM

IdBeCrazyIf: PC LOAD LETTER: Confabulat: Well I have a feeling that people in the 1930s and 1940s didn't exactly recoil in surprise when they encountered an older gentleman in a wheelchair, you know.

It was more "give the man his dignity". "No one needs to see that". Like I said, if they knew he had polio, they knew what that meant. The rest was keeping up appearances.

More or less this. My great grand father told me that everyone just assumed because really if you got polio you usually lost some function of your legs. They cast it aside because he was an inspirational leader through his voice on the radio.


Imagine that time too. We have all grown to understand that most radio DJs and skilled voice actors are pretty damn ugly, cause we've all had that shock a hundred times over.

In those days, that was all they had. FDR's frickin' VOICE. Damn right they should have propped him up a little. They should have had that little evil alien that Clint Howard used as a stand-in for that one Star Trek.

We are a pretty bitter, cynical society in 2013. Maybe that would have just been pushing it too far.
 
2013-07-10 09:12:34 AM
I dumped the link when a stupid ad popped in the beginning without me having the option of clicking off it in 5 seconds.
/tired of intrusion marketing
//not everything on this planet has to be fπcking monetized.
 
2013-07-10 09:14:52 AM
/pphhbbtt
 
2013-07-10 09:18:14 AM
Strange, you know who else fancied a wheel chair and fancied nucular bombs and smoked like a chimney and talked like Werner von Braun?

www.ait.org.tw
 
2013-07-10 09:20:24 AM

kronicfeld: They kept this secret, too:

[cf2.imgobject.com image 519x291]


How is that movie? it looks epic
 
2013-07-10 09:22:33 AM

PC LOAD LETTER: Confabulat: Well I have a feeling that people in the 1930s and 1940s didn't exactly recoil in surprise when they encountered an older gentleman in a wheelchair, you know.

It was more "give the man his dignity". "No one needs to see that". Like I said, if they knew he had polio, they knew what that meant. The rest was keeping up appearances.


It was more, "we can't allow him to be seen as weak.  He might not get reelected."  All choreographed propaganda...which is par for the course with US presidents.
 
2013-07-10 09:26:33 AM
People had honor and dignity and respect for one another once.

We... we suck now...
 
2013-07-10 09:27:45 AM
Polio was serious business back then. No reason to focus on it. Lots of people got screwed by it.
 
2013-07-10 09:31:02 AM
I'm thinking it wasn't a secret, but back then people didn't point and laugh because the Internet hadn't made that the cool thing to do yet.
 
2013-07-10 09:31:03 AM
What the hell is on his lap?
 
2013-07-10 09:33:54 AM

Cataholic: PC LOAD LETTER: Confabulat: Well I have a feeling that people in the 1930s and 1940s didn't exactly recoil in surprise when they encountered an older gentleman in a wheelchair, you know.

It was more "give the man his dignity". "No one needs to see that". Like I said, if they knew he had polio, they knew what that meant. The rest was keeping up appearances.

It was more, "we can't allow him to be seen as weak.  He might not get reelected."  All choreographed propaganda...which is par for the course with US presidents.



This.  Except for the reelection part.  I think he was rather tired after 3 terms anyway.

The thing is, the President of the most powerful country on the planet cannot be perceived to have weaknesses of any kind.  This is especially true when the country is a war.  Hell, they don't even talk about our current President's smoking all the time.

They can say this is all about dignity and respect.  But I tend to think it's more about the perception of the country at large.
 
2013-07-10 09:35:16 AM

give me doughnuts: doubled99: It was a kinder, gentler time. People knew to play down or try to ignore the shame of being disabled. Now people pretend it's not a negative, and loudly flaunt their handicap and demand others' lifestyles adjust to them.

Really? Tell it to the people of Berlin, London, Dresden, Coventry, Tokyo, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, etc. just how kind and gentle it was. Yes, we were at war but just try to imagine the epic shiatstorm that would erupt today if the U.S. military tried mass fire-bombings of civilian population centers.


You skipped out on the Jews, Russians, and Chinese.
 
2013-07-10 09:37:27 AM

mikieb: How is that movie? it looks epic


The first 20-30 minutes is pretty inanely funny, but the jokes run out after about a half hour. No movie with Ray Wise is all bad.
 
2013-07-10 09:42:02 AM

kronicfeld: They kept this secret, too:

[cf2.imgobject.com image 519x291]


That was the prototype version.

www.thefilmchair.com
 
2013-07-10 09:48:11 AM

IdBeCrazyIf: give me doughnuts: Really? Tell it to the people of Berlin, London, Dresden, Coventry, Tokyo, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, etc. just how kind and gentle it was. Yes, we were at war but just try to imagine the epic shiatstorm that would erupt today if the U.S. military tried mass fire-bombings of civilian population centers.

We've gotten more precision weaponry since then, but I will point you to the second battle at Fallujah where we would fire M1 Abrams HE rounds into homes to create distraction cover fire for Marine squads.

We uh...kinda killed a lot of people there and just claimed because they were helping the insurgency that they were combatants.



Did we sent a few dozen B-52s over at 30,000 feet and drop 100 tons of incendiaries on Fallujah?
The fire-bombings in Europe and Japan weren't done solely because of innaccurate bombs. Those were deliberate acts.
 
2013-07-10 09:51:42 AM

doubled99: It was a kinder, gentler time. People knew to play down or try to ignore the shame of being disabled. Now people pretend it's not a negative, and loudly flaunt their handicap and demand others' lifestyles adjust to them.


I'm sure they'd all go right back to living in the dark fighting rats for food if they knew what an inconvenience it is for you to be aware of their existence.
 
2013-07-10 09:51:59 AM

give me doughnuts: Did we sent a few dozen B-52s over at 30,000 feet and drop 100 tons of incendiaries on Fallujah?
The fire-bombings in Europe and Japan weren't done solely because of innaccurate bombs. Those were deliberate acts.


It was done on strategic towns and cities to prevent a war effort. Like or not, there was justification at the time because simple HE bombs couldn't do the job with the most effectiveness and I would almost with certainty predict that could have had directed munitions the bombing of entire cities would mostly be avoided.
 
2013-07-10 09:53:27 AM
My folks (born in 1920 and 1922) said everyone knew, but you just didn't talk about that kind of stuff back then. Some aspects of your life were actually considered private.

Just imagine a modern day King having a speech impediment like George VI. Newspapers would print every word he misspoke and Saturday Night Live would make fun of him.

The world used to have respect for decency before reality tv.
 
2013-07-10 09:56:58 AM
I'm pretty sure I saw a propaganda reel (shown during the time FDR's wheelchair was "secret") showing FDR being moved from one US Navy ship to another. It likely involved showing him "walking", but that is a bit fuzzy now (I'm assuming they faked it). Anybody else see this?
 
2013-07-10 09:58:19 AM

Confabulat: Well I have a feeling that people in the 1930s and 1940s didn't exactly recoil in surprise when they encountered an older gentleman in a wheelchair, you know.


"Older"? He was 50 when he was elected President.

Just because there's film of him in a wheelchair does mean it was made public back then.
 
2013-07-10 10:00:26 AM

Confabulat:  (admittedly I went to Florida public schools) but from what I understood it was widely known among the American people that FDR was a in wheelchair. I don't think it was secret exactly. I think it was just the culture of the time that they didn't mention it much or emphasize it.

But really, I don't think it was a secret. I might be wrong, I'm guessing many Americans just never thought about it.


The American public knew well before he was President. When FDR was running for Governor of NY in 1928, ex-Gov Al Smith told reporters, "A governor does not need to be an acrobat. We do not elect him for his ability to do a double back-flip or a handspring."


Astorix: I dumped the link when a stupid ad popped in the beginning without me having the option of clicking off it in 5 seconds.
/tired of intrusion marketing
//not everything on this planet has to be fπcking monetized.


Are you the last person in the world who has not heard of AdBlock?
 
2013-07-10 10:11:40 AM

Limeyluv: My folks (born in 1920 and 1922) said everyone knew, but you just didn't talk about that kind of stuff back then. Some aspects of your life were actually considered private.

Just imagine a modern day King having a speech impediment like George VI. Newspapers would print every word he misspoke and Saturday Night Live would make fun of him.

The world used to have respect for decency before reality tv.


^This.

It's ironic, society today is so focused on how people look and fixing as many imperfections as possible, yet they'll smugly look back at history and assume the lack of hysteria surrounding FDR's disability means people weren't as enlightened in their attitudes.  The idea they may have been just as enlightened, but expressed that in a different way, doesn't seem to occur.

Part of the reason the wheelchair was downplayed was because FDR himself struggled to come to terms with his disability; in an era where everyone has to share everything, I suppose not wanting to detail the minutiae of a very personal issue does seem unimaginable.
 
2013-07-10 10:16:05 AM

IdBeCrazyIf: give me doughnuts: Did we sent a few dozen B-52s over at 30,000 feet and drop 100 tons of incendiaries on Fallujah?
The fire-bombings in Europe and Japan weren't done solely because of innaccurate bombs. Those were deliberate acts.

It was done on strategic towns and cities to prevent a war effort. Like or not, there was justification at the time because simple HE bombs couldn't do the job with the most effectiveness and I would almost with certainty predict that could have had directed munitions the bombing of entire cities would mostly be avoided.



The choice was to either fly more missions to try and blow up factories etc. with conventional explosives, or fly fewer missions with incendiaries and burn the factory workers in their homes.
 
2013-07-10 10:19:54 AM

give me doughnuts: The choice was to either fly more missions to try and blow up factories etc. with conventional explosives, or fly fewer missions with incendiaries and burn the factory workers in their homes.


Exactly, strategic choice
 
2013-07-10 10:36:59 AM

IdBeCrazyIf: give me doughnuts: The choice was to either fly more missions to try and blow up factories etc. with conventional explosives, or fly fewer missions with incendiaries and burn the factory workers in their homes.

Exactly, strategic choice



And this was in a "kinder gentler time"?
 
2013-07-10 10:41:41 AM

borg: Confabulat: Well I have a feeling that people in the 1930s and 1940s didn't exactly recoil in surprise when they encountered an older gentleman in a wheelchair, you know.

"Older"? He was 50 when he was elected President.

Just because there's film of him in a wheelchair does mean it was made public back then.


In the 1930s, barely half of American men ever saw 60. Yeah, 50 was pretty old school.
 
2013-07-10 10:54:55 AM
Respect my disabili-tie!

/what a weird notion
 
2013-07-10 11:02:25 AM
WHAR IS SEX TAPE WHARRR????
 
2013-07-10 11:22:21 AM
But, most people would not see being confined to a wheelchair as a barrier to the office in this day and age.

Yeah, look at the amount of recent presidents who weren't athletic men at one point in their lives. We've had a whole lot of gimpy leaders.

Only the President's ability to lead is the modern requirement.

That and a war chest of millions of dollars and connections.
 
2013-07-10 11:36:59 AM

give me doughnuts: And this was in a "kinder gentler time"?


Well I never said that, reality was that reality was a harsh mistress but people tended to turn a blind eye

Hence why a big deal wasn't made about a lot of stuff
 
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