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(Information Management)   Tech hiring now accounts for 10% of all U.S. job growth. The other 90% still comes from pizza delivery, lawn service, convenience stores   (information-management.com) divider line 61
    More: Interesting, U.S., convenience stores, computing platform, discouraged worker, pizzas, lawns, employees, Bureau of Labor Statistics  
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734 clicks; posted to Business » on 10 Jul 2013 at 8:48 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-11 07:50:06 AM

DarkSoulNoHope: Pants full of macaroni!!: And government jobs.  Which, as everyone knows, are not REAL jobs.

Scary thing is that it used to be that the private jobs were the money makers that paid you alot more than government jobs, now it's the government jobs that would pay you what you're actually worth for a IT degree and some profit seeking company would be seeking you for a similar job at only 12 dollars an hour!


Yeah capitalism and globalization! Classical and neoclassical liberalism has never had serious negatives in history before or ever. Invisible hand! John Gault! Rugged Individualism! Boot Straps!
 
hej
2013-07-11 09:06:54 AM

kg2095: Early in my career I worked at a place where I had to serve as DBA, network admin, system admin, .NET dev, and laser printer plugger-inner.  The pay was quite low given what I was doing, but I got to enjoy 50% raises every year for the next 6 years after taking that job.

Software development requires uninterrupted blocks of concentration. If you have all that other stuff to do as well you won't get much programming done.


In the year that I was there, I had multiple people comment that the software had improved noticeably since I arrived.  Granted, I suppose it could have been more (and I'll admit, the bar was set low), but I think I got plenty of programming done.
 
hej
2013-07-11 09:15:55 AM
meyerkev:  We're looking for a full stack developer that we can use as a plug-in troubleshooter and additional warm body at every step along the pipeline.  It's trivial (relatively.  It's still hard) to get a part-stack developer, it's very hard to get a full-stack developer who isn't already employed.

We're also somewhat screwed because we have until the end of September-ish until we have to either be done with our current projects so we can get more funding or start looking for acqui-hires, so we can't afford to wait an additional week/weeks while they pick up our languages as well as our internal code base.  Few people are willing to come work with us for 6 months, most experienced people aren't willing to come work with us, and no experienced people who do what we need, could plug in more or less immediately, are in places where we can find them, and are a good culture fit are willing to come work for us.

/I mean, if they were willing to hire ME, imagine how desperate they are.


Have you considered getting part time moon lighters rather than trying to get a single full time 9-to-5 dev?  I'd think that people would be willing to entertain working for you half time on terms you can afford, if they didn't have to give up their day job.  Particularly if your project is actually "interesting."
 
2013-07-11 12:08:04 PM

html_007: I'm a DBA and getting a kick out of this.  I'm also the SharePoint admin, and now our primary applications specialist.   I get to deal with Microsoft Dynamics GP and Dynamics CRM  :)


I'm so sorry.  Seriously though that is a fragile framework.
 
2013-07-11 12:39:21 PM
My son just got his first job: Pizza maker. He works with a kid who claims to have a CS degree, but says he doesn't want to relocate to find a job, but there aren't any locally. So he works at the pizza place. And he rides the bus for over an hour to get to work.
 
2013-07-11 12:54:32 PM
Maybe it's just a location thing....but I've gone from big US city, to regular US suburb, to US college-town, to big European city and in every case found many companies that were hiring 'IT'.  I'm more on the development side, but whatever..  The last four companies I've worked at all were constantly looking for good candidates....even the place I'm at now has had open positions on job sites since before I found them and they've still got them up.

I also haven't heard anything close to the 'part-time hourly' stuff people are mentioning in the thread.  If someone is part-time and hourly, that means you have to pay them for each hour they work.  I'm always hearing of jobs with 'unspoken' expectations of 40-45+ hours per week (and in my most recent company - we actually have people who have a 45 hour per week contract).  Naturally, whenever there is a 'hiccup', the hours jump for a few weeks/months with no talk of additional compensation.

Anyway, I have a CS degree; but it's from a no-name state school.  I'm nothing special in terms of ability or dedication either - the likes of Google/Microsoft/Facebook/Anyone you've heard of would probably laugh me out of the interview, if I could even get an interview.
 
2013-07-11 01:52:34 PM

hej: skozlaw: There is absolutely no way I'm doing three different jobs for one paycheck. That's not opportunity, it's just stupidity.

It's stupidity that put me on the road to making six figures in the midwest.


Same story here - like many of us left in IT, I wear many hats and am compensated abundantly. Had one project recently where I wrote the requirements (business and technical), did the design work, implemented and tested a critical multi-threaded server app (including data recovery, storage, DB table design/indexing/reporting, writing the code, sql). And now I support it in production.

/ Why yes I also wrote a web reporting front-end for it as well using php
// Work for a Fortune 50 company
 
2013-07-11 02:35:09 PM

meyerkev: Slaves2Darkness: Good maybe employers are finally realizing that you don't need to be an expert in 27 different technologies to be an entry level code monkey. Or when hiring for a senior position if you really want the person you are hiring to be an expert in 27 different technologies 60K a year is not going to get them to sign on.

Since 2008 I've gone on at least 30 different job interviews, but not accepted one offer. All I can say is corporate management all apparently decided that they could beat down wages and went full retarded on trying to hire people who are actually skilled. Why would I leave my current position for one that pays 1/2 with out benefits? Yeah that was the worst offer I've had, but not one offer in the last five years has even equaled my current pay. Only reason I'm currently looking is because I'm bored.

Move to Silicon Valley.

You'll be losing 30-40% of your pay to taxes (depending on exactly where on the tax brackets you fall.  I'm about 30% total, 40% marginal), and rent SUCKS (Worth renting starts about $1800.  New starts about $2500), but we're trying to find people to hire and we can't.  Period.  No one can.  It's not a money thing, it's a "There are literally no people who have the skills we need and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold (read: get acquired by another company) because our seed runs out"

When Google wants to hire, they don't look for people to hire, they look for companies to acquire because there's no one there.

/Of course, you get to put up with the craziness that is CA, and the stupidity that is every single little town on the peninsula and in the East Bay hating cars and transit and bikes and walking and buses and anyone worth less than $100 Million, but the money may be worth it.


Weird. I have a PhD in Applied Physics from Stanford -- mostly semiconductor expertise, but exposure to coding, project management, huge list of patents and publications. I couldn't even get a call back from Google. I even applied for entry-level stuff. Couldn't figure that out.

Thankfully, there's still 1-2 semiconductor jobs left in the Bay Area, though it's a shrinking industry. (Which is why I'm trying to get out.)
 
2013-07-11 03:22:37 PM
I'm currently looking for a job and came across an ad for a Ghost Tour Guide + Laser Tag Coordinator. It was the most legitimate job posted in the Marketing/PR/Ad section on Craigslist, so I'm sure they received 600 applications, ha!
 
2013-07-11 05:43:55 PM

meyerkev: hej: meyerkev: Move to Silicon Valley.

You'll be losing 30-40% of your pay to taxes (depending on exactly where on the tax brackets you fall.  I'm about 30% total, 40% marginal), and rent SUCKS (Worth renting starts about $1800.  New starts about $2500), but we're trying to find people to hire and we can't.  Period.  No one can.  It's not a money thing, it's a "There are literally no people who have the skills we need and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold (read: get acquired by another company) because our seed runs out"

When Google wants to hire, they don't look for people to hire, they look for companies to acquire because there's no one there.

What skills do you need that are literally non existant?

We're looking for a full stack developer that we can use as a plug-in troubleshooter and additional warm body at every step along the pipeline.  It's trivial (relatively.  It's still hard) to get a part-stack developer, it's very hard to get a full-stack developer who isn't already employed.

We're also somewhat screwed because we have until the end of September-ish until we have to either be done with our current projects so we can get more funding or start looking for acqui-hires, so we can't afford to wait an additional week/weeks while they pick up our languages as well as our internal code base.  Few people are willing to come work with us for 6 months, most experienced people aren't willing to come work with us, and no experienced people who do what we need, could plug in more or less immediately, are in places where we can find them, and are a good culture fit are willing to come work for us.

/I mean, if they were willing to hire ME, imagine how desperate they are.


This sounds more like a physiological issue than a physical one.  I think businesses are still  a bit to wrapped up in the "You must come into the office and do work in our provided chairs/cubicles".  I understand in some sensitive situations it is part of the requirement but for the vast majority of software based companies you are shipping a large amount of your workload / codebase to foreign countries to begin with so why not broaden your search and remove the physical requirement?  The nice thing about development or anything else that has an obvious output is you can monitor the work regardless of where their rear end sits.
 
2013-07-11 06:58:16 PM

Kazrath: meyerkev: hej: meyerkev: Move to Silicon Valley.

You'll be losing 30-40% of your pay to taxes (depending on exactly where on the tax brackets you fall.  I'm about 30% total, 40% marginal), and rent SUCKS (Worth renting starts about $1800.  New starts about $2500), but we're trying to find people to hire and we can't.  Period.  No one can.  It's not a money thing, it's a "There are literally no people who have the skills we need and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold (read: get acquired by another company) because our seed runs out"

When Google wants to hire, they don't look for people to hire, they look for companies to acquire because there's no one there.

What skills do you need that are literally non existant?

We're looking for a full stack developer that we can use as a plug-in troubleshooter and additional warm body at every step along the pipeline.  It's trivial (relatively.  It's still hard) to get a part-stack developer, it's very hard to get a full-stack developer who isn't already employed.

We're also somewhat screwed because we have until the end of September-ish until we have to either be done with our current projects so we can get more funding or start looking for acqui-hires, so we can't afford to wait an additional week/weeks while they pick up our languages as well as our internal code base.  Few people are willing to come work with us for 6 months, most experienced people aren't willing to come work with us, and no experienced people who do what we need, could plug in more or less immediately, are in places where we can find them, and are a good culture fit are willing to come work for us.

/I mean, if they were willing to hire ME, imagine how desperate they are.

This sounds more like a physiological issue than a physical one.  I think businesses are still  a bit to wrapped up in the "You must come into the office and do work in our provided chairs/cubicles".  I understand in some sensitive situations it is part o ...


I'd argue that development doesn't have an obvious output.
 
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