If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Information Management)   Tech hiring now accounts for 10% of all U.S. job growth. The other 90% still comes from pizza delivery, lawn service, convenience stores   (information-management.com) divider line 61
    More: Interesting, U.S., convenience stores, computing platform, discouraged worker, pizzas, lawns, employees, Bureau of Labor Statistics  
•       •       •

723 clicks; posted to Business » on 10 Jul 2013 at 8:48 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



61 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-07-10 08:54:43 AM
And government jobs.  Which, as everyone knows, are not REAL jobs.
 
2013-07-10 08:55:14 AM
i.chzbgr.com
 
2013-07-10 09:23:46 AM
How many of those jobs are full-time with benefits?
 
2013-07-10 09:31:41 AM

guilt by association: How many of those jobs are full-time with benefits?


We're always hiring, full time with decent benefits.

People just have to be willing to relocate to where the jobs are.  Come on over to Iowa, we've got some tech jobs for ya.
 
2013-07-10 09:32:46 AM
We continue to be the world leaders in music, movies, microcode, and high-speed pizza delivery.
 
2013-07-10 09:38:19 AM
Situation:  Why do you want a tech job?  To make good money.  Why do you want to make good money?  Because you think you need it to meet women.

Problem:  Now that you have a tech job, you never meet women.

Solution:  You should have become a bartender.
 
2013-07-10 09:53:41 AM
Good maybe employers are finally realizing that you don't need to be an expert in 27 different technologies to be an entry level code monkey. Or when hiring for a senior position if you really want the person you are hiring to be an expert in 27 different technologies 60K a year is not going to get them to sign on.

Since 2008 I've gone on at least 30 different job interviews, but not accepted one offer. All I can say is corporate management all apparently decided that they could beat down wages and went full retarded on trying to hire people who are actually skilled. Why would I leave my current position for one that pays 1/2 with out benefits? Yeah that was the worst offer I've had, but not one offer in the last five years has even equaled my current pay. Only reason I'm currently looking is because I'm bored.
 
2013-07-10 10:20:43 AM
Maybe those guys need a Union?
 
2013-07-10 10:22:45 AM
Most of the job growth is coming in the form of part-time temp work.

I'm sure increased regulatory pressures on employers have nothing to do with this.
 
2013-07-10 10:23:42 AM

Slaves2Darkness: Since 2008 I've gone on at least 30 different job interviews, but not accepted one offer. All I can say is corporate management all apparently decided that they could beat down wages and went full retarded on trying to hire people who are actually skilled


I feel ya, man. I had a brief exchange with one HR goon about my not being a programmer when I was interviewing for a system and storage admin job.

Now, it's bad enough that they wanted system AND storage admin, but they assured me the storage admin portion was fairly modest because a lot of the grunt work was actually handled on a contract basis by the vendor, but then they asked if could code. I said, well, I can script in Powershell and I have some limited Perl ability for doing system admin tasks on Linux and they asked if I knew PHP. I said no. They asked if I'd be willing to learn it and I asked why.

Turns out they were down a programmer and having a hard time filling the position, so they wanted someone to come in and take over system, storage AND do programming work "as needed".

I asked if I'd get two paychecks and that pretty much ended that conversation.

You want me to do five jobs? Fine.

I'll expect five salaries though.
/ if you want to balance out your salary expenses to pay me, try firing HR since nobody who ever worked in HR ever once did a single useful bit of work that couldn't have have been accomplished just as well by a less useless employee
 
2013-07-10 10:55:21 AM

Slaves2Darkness: Good maybe employers are finally realizing that you don't need to be an expert in 27 different technologies to be an entry level code monkey. Or when hiring for a senior position if you really want the person you are hiring to be an expert in 27 different technologies 60K a year is not going to get them to sign on.

Since 2008 I've gone on at least 30 different job interviews, but not accepted one offer. All I can say is corporate management all apparently decided that they could beat down wages and went full retarded on trying to hire people who are actually skilled. Why would I leave my current position for one that pays 1/2 with out benefits? Yeah that was the worst offer I've had, but not one offer in the last five years has even equaled my current pay. Only reason I'm currently looking is because I'm bored.




Racism?
 
2013-07-10 11:31:11 AM

MugzyBrown: I'm sure increased regulatory pressures on employers have nothing to do with this.


You'd be right. Happens to even the worst of trolls and morons every once in a while.

Employers have a freer hand than they've had in decades, but still aren't content without further eroding workplace protections that are even older, all in the name of profit, shareholders, and cutting costs. There's been a paradigm shift in the employer/employee relationship that has nothing to do with government regulation.
 
hej
2013-07-10 11:41:10 AM
Kimpak:  People just have to be willing to relocate to where the jobs are.  Come on over to Iowa, we've got some tech jobs for ya.

And all the corn you could ever want.
 
hej
2013-07-10 11:46:31 AM

skozlaw: Turns out they were down a programmer and having a hard time filling the position, so they wanted someone to come in and take over system, storage AND do programming work "as needed".

I asked if I'd get two paychecks and that pretty much ended that conversation.

You want me to do five jobs? Fine.

I'll expect five salaries though.


If the programming they wanted you to learn was Java, .NET, or to a lesser extent even Python or C, then it sounds like you passed on a good opportunity to branch off into a field with much higher demand.

Early in my career I worked at a place where I had to serve as DBA, network admin, system admin, .NET dev, and laser printer plugger-inner.  The pay was quite low given what I was doing, but I got to enjoy 50% raises every year for the next 6 years after taking that job.
 
2013-07-10 11:49:54 AM
Tech hiring now accounts for 10% of all U.S. job growth

Or about 3% when you subtract out all the H1-B visas.
 
2013-07-10 12:20:37 PM

Slaves2Darkness: Good maybe employers are finally realizing that you don't need to be an expert in 27 different technologies to be an entry level code monkey. Or when hiring for a senior position if you really want the person you are hiring to be an expert in 27 different technologies 60K a year is not going to get them to sign on.

Since 2008 I've gone on at least 30 different job interviews, but not accepted one offer. All I can say is corporate management all apparently decided that they could beat down wages and went full retarded on trying to hire people who are actually skilled. Why would I leave my current position for one that pays 1/2 with out benefits? Yeah that was the worst offer I've had, but not one offer in the last five years has even equaled my current pay. Only reason I'm currently looking is because I'm bored.


Yup. My "Not getting out of bed for less than" value is now 100K. I enjoy the "hurr durr" I hear when I tell cold-calling recruiters that.
 
2013-07-10 12:53:42 PM

hej: If the programming they wanted you to learn was Java, .NET, or to a lesser extent even Python or C, then it sounds like you passed on a good opportunity to branch off into a field with much higher demand.


I have no interest in programming, but I especially have no interest in doing half-assed programming for nothing while I also try to do what is theoretically my actual job.

There is absolutely no way I'm doing three different jobs for one paycheck. That's not opportunity, it's just stupidity.
 
2013-07-10 01:37:59 PM

Kimpak: guilt by association: How many of those jobs are full-time with benefits?

We're always hiring, full time with decent benefits.

People just have to be willing to relocate to where the jobs are.  Come on over to Iowa, we've got some tech jobs for ya.


Or Nebraska. We've also got some available.
 
2013-07-10 01:43:31 PM
Glad I'm in the 10% and with solid skills.  Best thing I ever did was change careers from law enforcement to IT in 1997.  Nobody dies when a server goes down (though some people do act like it's the end of the world even if that system doesn't cost the company money when it goes down).
 
2013-07-10 01:59:44 PM
I'm a DBA and getting a kick out of this.  I'm also the SharePoint admin, and now our primary applications specialist.  I get to deal with Microsoft Dynamics GP and Dynamics CRM  :)
 
hej
2013-07-10 02:22:11 PM

skozlaw: There is absolutely no way I'm doing three different jobs for one paycheck. That's not opportunity, it's just stupidity.


It's stupidity that put me on the road to making six figures in the midwest.
 
2013-07-10 02:51:54 PM

Slaves2Darkness: Good maybe employers are finally realizing that you don't need to be an expert in 27 different technologies to be an entry level code monkey. Or when hiring for a senior position if you really want the person you are hiring to be an expert in 27 different technologies 60K a year is not going to get them to sign on.

Since 2008 I've gone on at least 30 different job interviews, but not accepted one offer. All I can say is corporate management all apparently decided that they could beat down wages and went full retarded on trying to hire people who are actually skilled. Why would I leave my current position for one that pays 1/2 with out benefits? Yeah that was the worst offer I've had, but not one offer in the last five years has even equaled my current pay. Only reason I'm currently looking is because I'm bored.


You sound overpaid.
 
2013-07-10 02:55:38 PM

lilbjorn: Tech hiring now accounts for 10% of all U.S. job growth

Or about 3% when you subtract out all the H1-B visas.


The H1-B Visa quota was filled in like February.
 
2013-07-10 02:56:49 PM

html_007: I'm a DBA and getting a kick out of this.  I'm also the SharePoint admin, and now our primary applications specialist.  I get to deal with Microsoft Dynamics GP and Dynamics CRM  :)


You don't happen to want to relocate to Michigan, do you?
 
2013-07-10 03:10:35 PM

slayer199: Glad I'm in the 10% and with solid skills.  Best thing I ever did was change careers from law enforcement to IT in 1997.  Nobody dies when a server goes down (though some people do act like it's the end of the world even if that system doesn't cost the company money when it goes down).


Point of order, sometimes people DO die when the server goes down... I'm glad I don't have TOO many of those customers, but I still remember having to deal with that a few times. Really makes it much easier to deal with purely-financial outages. Awww, your Oracle database is offline and ten billion Euro worth of account data is now b0rked? Gee, that's too bad. At least YOU get to go home after your shift is over and drink a beer and watch TV...
 
2013-07-10 03:18:57 PM

meanmutton: html_007: I'm a DBA and getting a kick out of this.  I'm also the SharePoint admin, and now our primary applications specialist.  I get to deal with Microsoft Dynamics GP and Dynamics CRM  :)

You don't happen to want to relocate to Michigan, do you?


I'm happy in Oklahoma for the time being.  Unless we are looking at 100k+
 
hej
2013-07-10 03:24:39 PM

html_007: meanmutton: html_007: I'm a DBA and getting a kick out of this.  I'm also the SharePoint admin, and now our primary applications specialist.  I get to deal with Microsoft Dynamics GP and Dynamics CRM  :)

You don't happen to want to relocate to Michigan, do you?

I'm happy in Oklahoma for the time being.  Unless we are looking at 100k+


You are looking at 100K+.
 
2013-07-10 04:20:50 PM

Slaves2Darkness: Good maybe employers are finally realizing that you don't need to be an expert in 27 different technologies to be an entry level code monkey. Or when hiring for a senior position if you really want the person you are hiring to be an expert in 27 different technologies 60K a year is not going to get them to sign on.

Since 2008 I've gone on at least 30 different job interviews, but not accepted one offer. All I can say is corporate management all apparently decided that they could beat down wages and went full retarded on trying to hire people who are actually skilled. Why would I leave my current position for one that pays 1/2 with out benefits? Yeah that was the worst offer I've had, but not one offer in the last five years has even equaled my current pay. Only reason I'm currently looking is because I'm bored.


Move to Silicon Valley.

You'll be losing 30-40% of your pay to taxes (depending on exactly where on the tax brackets you fall.  I'm about 30% total, 40% marginal), and rent SUCKS (Worth renting starts about $1800.  New starts about $2500), but we're trying to find people to hire and we can't.  Period.  No one can.  It's not a money thing, it's a "There are literally no people who have the skills we need and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold (read: get acquired by another company) because our seed runs out"

When Google wants to hire, they don't look for people to hire, they look for companies to acquire because there's no one there.

/Of course, you get to put up with the craziness that is CA, and the stupidity that is every single little town on the peninsula and in the East Bay hating cars and transit and bikes and walking and buses and anyone worth less than $100 Million, but the money may be worth it.
 
2013-07-10 05:24:21 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: Employers have a freer hand than they've had in decades, but still aren't content without further eroding workplace protections that are even older, all in the name of profit, shareholders, and cutting costs. There's been a paradigm shift in the employer/employee relationship that has nothing to do with government regulation.


Workers are no longer an asset.  Skilled workers are a liability, because they make outrageous demands like fair compensation for their training and experience or basic human rights.  If you employer found out today that they could fire your ass and import someone who'd do your job badly for peanuts, you'd be out the door by lunch.
 
hej
2013-07-10 05:31:46 PM

meyerkev: Move to Silicon Valley.

You'll be losing 30-40% of your pay to taxes (depending on exactly where on the tax brackets you fall.  I'm about 30% total, 40% marginal), and rent SUCKS (Worth renting starts about $1800.  New starts about $2500), but we're trying to find people to hire and we can't.  Period.  No one can.  It's not a money thing, it's a "There are literally no people who have the skills we need and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold (read: get acquired by another company) because our seed runs out"

When Google wants to hire, they don't look for people to hire, they look for companies to acquire because there's no one there.


What skills do you need that are literally non existant?
 
2013-07-10 05:41:56 PM

hej: meyerkev: Move to Silicon Valley.

You'll be losing 30-40% of your pay to taxes (depending on exactly where on the tax brackets you fall.  I'm about 30% total, 40% marginal), and rent SUCKS (Worth renting starts about $1800.  New starts about $2500), but we're trying to find people to hire and we can't.  Period.  No one can.  It's not a money thing, it's a "There are literally no people who have the skills we need and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold (read: get acquired by another company) because our seed runs out"

When Google wants to hire, they don't look for people to hire, they look for companies to acquire because there's no one there.

What skills do you need that are literally non existant?


Barge-toting, bale-lifting, coprophagy (preferably in sandwich form).

Although I think the key point was "and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold".  Because I totally want to uproot my life and move to a place where my new job will vanish in less than a year.

/says the academic nomad
 
2013-07-10 05:56:03 PM

hej: meyerkev: Move to Silicon Valley.

You'll be losing 30-40% of your pay to taxes (depending on exactly where on the tax brackets you fall.  I'm about 30% total, 40% marginal), and rent SUCKS (Worth renting starts about $1800.  New starts about $2500), but we're trying to find people to hire and we can't.  Period.  No one can.  It's not a money thing, it's a "There are literally no people who have the skills we need and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold (read: get acquired by another company) because our seed runs out"

When Google wants to hire, they don't look for people to hire, they look for companies to acquire because there's no one there.

What skills do you need that are literally non existant?


We're looking for a full stack developer that we can use as a plug-in troubleshooter and additional warm body at every step along the pipeline.  It's trivial (relatively.  It's still hard) to get a part-stack developer, it's very hard to get a full-stack developer who isn't already employed.

We're also somewhat screwed because we have until the end of September-ish until we have to either be done with our current projects so we can get more funding or start looking for acqui-hires, so we can't afford to wait an additional week/weeks while they pick up our languages as well as our internal code base.  Few people are willing to come work with us for 6 months, most experienced people aren't willing to come work with us, and no experienced people who do what we need, could plug in more or less immediately, are in places where we can find them, and are a good culture fit are willing to come work for us.

/I mean, if they were willing to hire ME, imagine how desperate they are.
 
2013-07-10 05:56:49 PM

MugzyBrown: Most of the job growth is coming in the form of part-time temp work.

I'm sure increased regulatory pressures on employers have nothing to do with this.


Regulation is the only way to keep sociopath businesses from behaving destructively.
 
2013-07-10 06:00:20 PM

hej: skozlaw: Turns out they were down a programmer and having a hard time filling the position, so they wanted someone to come in and take over system, storage AND do programming work "as needed".

I asked if I'd get two paychecks and that pretty much ended that conversation.

You want me to do five jobs? Fine.

I'll expect five salaries though.

If the programming they wanted you to learn was Java, .NET, or to a lesser extent even Python or C, then it sounds like you passed on a good opportunity to branch off into a field with much higher demand.

Early in my career I worked at a place where I had to serve as DBA, network admin, system admin, .NET dev, and laser printer plugger-inner.  The pay was quite low given what I was doing, but I got to enjoy 50% raises every year for the next 6 years after taking that job.


Software development requires uninterrupted blocks of concentration. If you have all that other stuff to do as well you won't get much programming done.
 
2013-07-10 06:04:28 PM

meyerkev: Slaves2Darkness: Good maybe employers are finally realizing that you don't need to be an expert in 27 different technologies to be an entry level code monkey. Or when hiring for a senior position if you really want the person you are hiring to be an expert in 27 different technologies 60K a year is not going to get them to sign on.

Since 2008 I've gone on at least 30 different job interviews, but not accepted one offer. All I can say is corporate management all apparently decided that they could beat down wages and went full retarded on trying to hire people who are actually skilled. Why would I leave my current position for one that pays 1/2 with out benefits? Yeah that was the worst offer I've had, but not one offer in the last five years has even equaled my current pay. Only reason I'm currently looking is because I'm bored.

Move to Silicon Valley.

You'll be losing 30-40% of your pay to taxes (depending on exactly where on the tax brackets you fall.  I'm about 30% total, 40% marginal), and rent SUCKS (Worth renting starts about $1800.  New starts about $2500), but we're trying to find people to hire and we can't.  Period.  No one can.  It's not a money thing, it's a "There are literally no people who have the skills we need and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold (read: get acquired by another company) because our seed runs out"

When Google wants to hire, they don't look for people to hire, they look for companies to acquire because there's no one there.

/Of course, you get to put up with the craziness that is CA, and the stupidity that is every single little town on the peninsula and in the East Bay hating cars and transit and bikes and walking and buses and anyone worth less than $100 Million, but the money may be worth it.


It sounds like you hate California. Why don't you leave?
 
2013-07-10 06:08:05 PM

Bondith: Although I think the key point was "and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold".  Because I totally want to uproot my life and move to a place where my new job will vanish in less than a year.

/says the academic nomad


Yeah.

If we do everything right, we get more funding, which lets us move on to Series A/B where we can start expanding and making real money (and in turn make my 2 dimes actually worth more than an expensive dinner out).

If something goes wrong (which at this point means anything more than: "Stomach bug takes out our front-end web guy for 3 days") over the next 2-3 months, we're boned, and we use the last few months of seed to go find new jobs (preferably via acqui-hire since cap. gains is way cheaper than windfall taxes and I really like working with these guys).
 
2013-07-10 06:10:03 PM

guilt by association: How many of those jobs are full-time with benefits?


^THIS^

/no vacation
//no sick days
///virgule comes in threes
 
2013-07-10 06:38:22 PM

skozlaw: Slaves2Darkness: Since 2008 I've gone on at least 30 different job interviews, but not accepted one offer. All I can say is corporate management all apparently decided that they could beat down wages and went full retarded on trying to hire people who are actually skilled

I feel ya, man. I had a brief exchange with one HR goon about my not being a programmer when I was interviewing for a system and storage admin job.

Now, it's bad enough that they wanted system AND storage admin, but they assured me the storage admin portion was fairly modest because a lot of the grunt work was actually handled on a contract basis by the vendor, but then they asked if could code. I said, well, I can script in Powershell and I have some limited Perl ability for doing system admin tasks on Linux and they asked if I knew PHP. I said no. They asked if I'd be willing to learn it and I asked why.

Turns out they were down a programmer and having a hard time filling the position, so they wanted someone to come in and take over system, storage AND do programming work "as needed".

I asked if I'd get two paychecks and that pretty much ended that conversation.

You want me to do five jobs? Fine.

I'll expect five salaries though.
/ if you want to balance out your salary expenses to pay me, try firing HR since nobody who ever worked in HR ever once did a single useful bit of work that couldn't have have been accomplished just as well by a less useless employee


so now you say someone should do their job in addition to the HR work, little bit of a hypocrite aren't you
 
2013-07-10 06:58:37 PM

meyerkev: Few people are willing to come work with us for 6 months, most experienced people aren't willing to come work with us, and no experienced people who do what we need, could plug in more or less immediately, are in places where we can find them, and are a good culture fit are willing to come work for us.


(This isn't directed at you, but it's a convenient trigger for a venting rant.)

Y'know, if I listed that many conditions on why I couldn't find a job, I'd be called picky, entitled, and that I should be grateful for any sort of work in this economy.

(And the person telling me probably wouldn't have had to look for a job in decades.)
 
2013-07-10 07:08:50 PM

Bondith: If you employer found out today that they could fire your ass and import someone who'd do your job badly for peanuts, you'd be out the door by lunch.


Oh, I know, it happened to me.
Company got a new VP who immediately outsourced the whole department to Hungary. I'd just poured a morning coffee when the dept. manager tells us all to save our work and get out, with HR right there to make sure no one left with security dongles or parking passes.
 
2013-07-10 08:20:33 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: Bondith: If you employer found out today that they could fire your ass and import someone who'd do your job badly for peanuts, you'd be out the door by lunch.

Oh, I know, it happened to me.
Company got a new VP who immediately outsourced the whole department to Hungary. I'd just poured a morning coffee when the dept. manager tells us all to save our work and get out, with HR right there to make sure no one left with security dongles or parking passes.


How much notice did they demand from an employee quitting?
 
2013-07-10 08:57:16 PM

Bondith: How much notice did they demand from an employee quitting?


Can't rightly remember. Had no desire for quitting. They paid well, had a great training program, and great benefits.
I'm sure  the VP got a huge farking bonus for saving so much money on worthless employees.
 
2013-07-10 09:01:44 PM

Bondith: meyerkev: Few people are willing to come work with us for 6 months, most experienced people aren't willing to come work with us, and no experienced people who do what we need, could plug in more or less immediately, are in places where we can find them, and are a good culture fit are willing to come work for us.

(This isn't directed at you, but it's a convenient trigger for a venting rant.)

Y'know, if I listed that many conditions on why I couldn't find a job, I'd be called picky, entitled, and that I should be grateful for any sort of work in this economy.

(And the person telling me probably wouldn't have had to look for a job in decades.)


If you're software, come to SV and write your own ticket.  Especially if you're full-stack and experienced.  You can write your own ticket in a $175K a year starting offer sort of way.

The software market (at least here in Silicon Valley) is a victim of it's own success.

You want a college grad (or really anything less than 5-10 years out of school)?  Great.  Head on up to any university, and set up a booth.  They'll be relatively expensive, because rent is farking INSANE, and everyone's trying to retire their student loan + new car + "Oh fark, where am I supposed to get $5-10K for a security deposit, first months rent, moving expenses, and a bed" debt, but they're easy to find.  (In fact, if you're smart, you'll toss out lots of stock.  After taxes, the difference between my Detroit offers and my SF Bay offers was about $5K + stock).Sure, some kids are founding their own startups straight out of college, but they're rare (that pesky student loan debt + the whole "Hi, I'm 21, and I want you to give me $2 Million in seed money" thing), and there's a LOT more kids trying to find "cool" jobs.


You want someone more than about 5-10 years out?  You're going to have some problems.  A lot of them are sitting at the big corps, because big corps have GREAT benefits and good pay and a lot of them got burned by failed startups (Doing the math, this job pays 40-50% less than going with BigCorp up in Seattle would have once you take COL/taxes into account).  But the rest are taking that nest egg they built up over the last 5-15 years, getting some venture capital, and doing their own thing.  Even a "failed" startup is going to get acqui-hired for a few mil after a couple years.

So the experienced developers are either stuck at BigCorp because they like seeing their kids at 6:00 instead of going home at 9:00 or making WAY more money than you could ever think about offering them.  Ever.   (Note: These are the people who you see saying things like "I don't even get out of bed for less than 100K").  This isn't a matter of "The market is tight," it's a matter of "The market doesn't exist because they make WAY more money doing their own thing."


And if you want somebody who's even more senior and even more experienced and really, really good?  Well, congrats, they're stuck at BigCorp as "Senior Engineers" (making more in a year pre-tax than my father makes in a decade) or retired.  Even flipping some failed startups makes you a multi-millionaire over a few iterations and if they're one of the lucky ones, they now have 7-8 figures of personal wealth.  These guys don't just get out of bed for less than $100K, they don't get out of bed at all.  Ironically, the market for these guys is a little bit more open for these guys than for the last because you might be able to get people in as "advisors", where they show up every other Tuesday because they think you and your idea are cool, but this is hard and requires networking.
 
2013-07-10 09:32:40 PM

meyerkev: Bondith: meyerkev: Few people are willing to come work with us for 6 months, most experienced people aren't willing to come work with us, and no experienced people who do what we need, could plug in more or less immediately, are in places where we can find them, and are a good culture fit are willing to come work for us.

(This isn't directed at you, but it's a convenient trigger for a venting rant.)

Y'know, if I listed that many conditions on why I couldn't find a job, I'd be called picky, entitled, and that I should be grateful for any sort of work in this economy.

(And the person telling me probably wouldn't have had to look for a job in decades.)

If you're software, come to SV and write your own ticket.  Especially if you're full-stack and experienced.  You can write your own ticket in a $175K a year starting offer sort of way.


(snipped for brevity)

That was enlightening.  The startup vs. big company distinction was one I hadn't made before.

In your experience, who's doing most of the H1-B hiring?  Big guys or startups?  Are they getting the experience they're looking for?  Next time I complain about this I want to make sure I'm doing it factually.
 
2013-07-10 10:08:00 PM

lilbjorn: Tech hiring now accounts for 10% of all U.S. job growth

Or about 3% when you subtract out all the H1-B visas.


THIS

/retired IT recruiter
 
2013-07-10 10:17:09 PM

Bondith: In your experience, who's doing most of the H1-B hiring?  Big guys or startups?  Are they getting the experience they're looking for?  Next time I complain about this I want to make sure I'm doing it factually.


Keeping in mind that I've been here for Not-Very-Long-At-All, big guys.  Big Guys are doing all of the H1-B hiring.

BigCorps have immigration lawyers.
BigCorps can afford to wait around for however long it takes to actually process a H1-B application.  From the VC rep introducing us to "Hi, here's an offer" at my current startup was about 3 weeks and 2 of that was me trying to find time to fly out to the West Coast.   Our last 2 hires were done over a matter of days.
Since H1-B's require you to work for the same company for the length of the visa, the employees want to work for Big Corp, since they'll be around for more than a year after they're hired and the Big Corps benefit from the low(er.  A BAD apartment in the valley is $1500/month for a 1BR)-cost slave labor (Startups tend to tie you by golden handcuffs of delayed stock benefits in exchange for a lower salary instead).
BigCorps don't have to require that their employees speak intelligible reasonably accented English (I was at Microsoft for a summer.  This was a bigger problem than you'd think), because a large percentage of their other people are H1-B's and people can shift teams.  We've got 2 guys from Greece at my current company, but I can understand every single word they're saying (which I honestly can't do with the stronger Asian accents.  I admit that it's a failing, but if I can't understand a word you're saying, you're not a good coworker).
BigCorps can absorb the crapshoot of incompetence that H1-B's provide better than Startups.  Just like everyone else, there are some really good H1-B's and some really bad H1-B's and they're really hard to tell apart from Bangalore and since one idiot can sink a startup, you have a problem if you're sitting in SF trying to pick people from Bangalore.
 
2013-07-10 10:19:29 PM

hej: meyerkev: Move to Silicon Valley.

You'll be losing 30-40% of your pay to taxes (depending on exactly where on the tax brackets you fall.  I'm about 30% total, 40% marginal), and rent SUCKS (Worth renting starts about $1800.  New starts about $2500), but we're trying to find people to hire and we can't.  Period.  No one can.  It's not a money thing, it's a "There are literally no people who have the skills we need and are willing to come work with us for the 6 months until we fold (read: get acquired by another company) because our seed runs out"

When Google wants to hire, they don't look for people to hire, they look for companies to acquire because there's no one there.

What skills do you need that are literally non existant?




Be under 30 or younger is the main one.
 
2013-07-11 12:59:00 AM

Drunken_Empath: Point of order, sometimes people DO die when the server goes down... I'm glad I don't have TOO many of those customers, but I still remember having to deal with that a few times. Really makes it much easier to deal with purely-financial outages. Awww, your Oracle database is offline and ten billion Euro worth of account data is now b0rked? Gee, that's too bad. At least YOU get to go home after your shift is over and drink a beer and watch TV...


I figured someone would pipe up and say they support systems that people rely on to live.  Fortunately, I've never been in that situation (mostly supported manufacturing, banking, and hosting).  The one thing I did learn from law enforcement is perspective.  I'm calm and cool in times of an IT crisis and focused on fixing the issue..while everyone else is freaking out because any of the systems I've supported at worst will only cost a company money when they go down...nobody dies when the server does.
 
2013-07-11 02:56:23 AM

Pants full of macaroni!!: And government jobs.  Which, as everyone knows, are not REAL jobs.


Scary thing is that it used to be that the private jobs were the money makers that paid you alot more than government jobs, now it's the government jobs that would pay you what you're actually worth for a IT degree and some profit seeking company would be seeking you for a similar job at only 12 dollars an hour!
 
2013-07-11 03:09:15 AM

Arkanaut: We continue to be the world leaders in music, movies, microcode, and high-speed pizza delivery.


Yeeep.
 
Displayed 50 of 61 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »




From the Fark Shop:
More from the Fark Shop » 



Report