If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Washington Post)   Scientists are trying to bring the passenger pigeon back from extinction. Because, Fark you that's why   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 48
    More: Interesting, extinctions, George Church, egg cells, gametes, habitat destruction, woolly mammoths, genomes, evolutionary biologist  
•       •       •

1348 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jul 2013 at 6:27 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-07-09 05:00:17 PM
i.imgur.com
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-07-09 05:19:33 PM
Imagine 10 million pigeons flying over your car. You'd be begging Monsanto to design some toxic-to-pigeons corn.
 
2013-07-09 06:35:14 PM
When I was a child, I used to see flocks of birds that would form rather large 'clouds' in the sky. I never see those anymore... I see the occasional flock of birds but nothing like the large flocks I saw when I was young.
 
2013-07-09 06:38:06 PM
See, this makes sense.  It is relatively recently extinct, it has close living relatives, and we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.  But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.  Work on something where you can control the variables, and isolate the reason for a failure. We need to de-extinct animals from the near-present, not try to recreate Jurassic Park.
 
2013-07-09 06:39:34 PM
Lets see the NSA metaBird this.
 
2013-07-09 06:42:11 PM
They sound tasty.
 
2013-07-09 06:43:59 PM

phalamir: See, this makes sense.  It is relatively recently extinct, it has close living relatives, and we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.  But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.  Work on something where you can control the variables, and isolate the reason for a failure. We need to de-extinct animals from the near-present, not try to recreate Jurassic Park.


Mammoths did die out in the near-present.
 
2013-07-09 06:44:03 PM

JohnnyC: When I was a child, I used to see flocks of birds that would form rather large 'clouds' in the sky. I never see those anymore... I see the occasional flock of birds but nothing like the large flocks I saw when I was young.


Where'd you grow up, and where do you live now?

I grew up near Saginaw Bay, and the flocks of birds were massive as it was on a major migratory route, and they still are as far as I can tell when I happen to be visiting home when they're migrating.

Fields full of geese, the masses of ducks on the water.  It's amazing.
 
2013-07-09 06:44:35 PM
I've seen how this ends.  It turns out these creatures can lay fertile eggs and they're going to kill a lot of innocent people because scientists were too preoccupied with whether they could and never stopped to consider whether they should.
 
2013-07-09 06:46:32 PM

To The Escape Zeppelin!: phalamir: See, this makes sense.  It is relatively recently extinct, it has close living relatives, and we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.  But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.  Work on something where you can control the variables, and isolate the reason for a failure. We need to de-extinct animals from the near-present, not try to recreate Jurassic Park.

Mammoths did die out in the near-present.


So did dinosaurs, at least on the cosmological time scale.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-07-09 06:48:32 PM
we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.

I'm not sure about that. Habitat loss was a factor in its extinction.

The good news is, chicks do not need any parentail training (like cats teaching kittens to hunt). Passenger pigeon parents abandoned chicks in their nests when they were fully grown.

Good source of all passenger pigeon-related trivia: The Passenger Pigeon: Its History and Extinction by A. W. Schorger.
 
2013-07-09 06:48:41 PM
We have a lot of European Ring Neck Doves in our area.   Fish&Game has classified them as an invasive species.   When asked why they were spreading so fast, I heard one biologist suggest, they fill the same ecological niche as the passenger pigeon, and nothing else had stepped up to take its place.
 
2013-07-09 06:50:24 PM

meat0918: To The Escape Zeppelin!: phalamir: See, this makes sense.  It is relatively recently extinct, it has close living relatives, and we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.  But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.  Work on something where you can control the variables, and isolate the reason for a failure. We need to de-extinct animals from the near-present, not try to recreate Jurassic Park.

Mammoths did die out in the near-present.

So did dinosaurs, at least on the cosmological time scale.


http://io9.com/5896262/the-last-mammoths-died-out-just-3600-years-ag ob ut-they-should-have-survived
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-07-09 06:52:18 PM
We have a lot of European Ring Neck Doves in our area. Fish&Game has classified them as an invasive species. When asked why they were spreading so fast, I heard one biologist suggest, they fill the same ecological niche as the passenger pigeon, and nothing else had stepped up to take its place.

I am skeptical of this explanation. Passenger pigeons were migratory, formed huge flocks, and ate a lot of tree nuts as well as seeds.
 
2013-07-09 06:53:57 PM

JohnnyC: When I was a child, I used to see flocks of birds that would form rather large 'clouds' in the sky. I never see those anymore... I see the occasional flock of birds but nothing like the large flocks I saw when I was young.


Assuming you're not 100 years old, you might be thinking of the European starling, which tend to flock in large numbers. They're not only still around, they're thriving in North America, where they are an invasive species with no native predators.
 
2013-07-09 06:56:38 PM

Smoking GNU: meat0918: To The Escape Zeppelin!: phalamir: See, this makes sense.  It is relatively recently extinct, it has close living relatives, and we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.  But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.  Work on something where you can control the variables, and isolate the reason for a failure. We need to de-extinct animals from the near-present, not try to recreate Jurassic Park.

Mammoths did die out in the near-present.

So did dinosaurs, at least on the cosmological time scale.

http://io9.com/5896262/the-last-mammoths-died-out-just-3600-years-ag ob ut-they-should-have-survived


Holy crap!

I was completely unaware of that!
 
2013-07-09 07:01:08 PM

meat0918: Smoking GNU: meat0918: To The Escape Zeppelin!: phalamir: See, this makes sense.  It is relatively recently extinct, it has close living relatives, and we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.  But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.  Work on something where you can control the variables, and isolate the reason for a failure. We need to de-extinct animals from the near-present, not try to recreate Jurassic Park.

Mammoths did die out in the near-present.

So did dinosaurs, at least on the cosmological time scale.

http://io9.com/5896262/the-last-mammoths-died-out-just-3600-years-ag ob ut-they-should-have-survived

Holy crap!

I was completely unaware of that!


As was i, until i googled it to reply to your post.
 
2013-07-09 07:02:35 PM

phalamir: See, this makes sense.  It is relatively recently extinct, it has close living relatives, and we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.  But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.  Work on something where you can control the variables, and isolate the reason for a failure. We need to de-extinct animals from the near-present, not try to recreate Jurassic Park.


I think it behooves us to find out what they taste like first before we go making any rash decisions.
 
2013-07-09 07:03:00 PM
Funny thing is, this is more like Jurassic Park compared to reviving Mammoths.
 
2013-07-09 07:04:52 PM

WhippingBoy: phalamir: See, this makes sense.  It is relatively recently extinct, it has close living relatives, and we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.  But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.  Work on something where you can control the variables, and isolate the reason for a failure. We need to de-extinct animals from the near-present, not try to recreate Jurassic Park.

I think it behooves us to find out what they taste like first before we go making any rash decisions.


I would imagine similar to squab, so like dark chicken meat?
 
2013-07-09 07:12:49 PM

wildsnowllama: I would imagine similar to squab, so like dark chicken meat?


No no no, mammoth.
 
2013-07-09 07:16:26 PM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-09 07:16:48 PM

Mentalpatient87: wildsnowllama: I would imagine similar to squab, so like dark chicken meat?

No no no, mammoth.


Both. And throw in some brontosaurus steaks as well.

The worth of an animal is based solely on how good it tastes.
 
2013-07-09 07:17:24 PM

meat0918: Holy crap!

I was completely unaware of that!


I really want to live long enough to see a mammoth come back. Or a passenger pigeon, or any other recently extinct animal. Mostly a Mammoth.
 
2013-07-09 07:20:46 PM
How long before the NSA is using FISA hawks?

/Hey "catch, photocopy message, and release" is not a 4th Amendment violation.
 
2013-07-09 07:21:48 PM
The work is being spearheaded by Ben J. Novak, a young biologist

On the case:

www.givememyremote.com
 
2013-07-09 07:42:44 PM

WhippingBoy: phalamir: See, this makes sense.  It is relatively recently extinct, it has close living relatives, and we know it has a viable habitat to inhabit.  But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.  Work on something where you can control the variables, and isolate the reason for a failure. We need to de-extinct animals from the near-present, not try to recreate Jurassic Park.

I think it behooves us to find out what they taste like first before we go making any rash decisions.


They were tasty enough that hundreds of millions were consumed in a rather short period of time.
 
2013-07-09 07:55:02 PM

phalamir: But the idea olf shoving a maammoth egg up some poor cow's twat, in the hopes that her biology will work enough to get a calf that has no place to live except some concrete room is just plain cruel.


Burgers, dude. Think of the burgers.
 
2013-07-09 07:59:22 PM
I just don't see how a person could ever ride on a bird that small....
 
2013-07-09 08:18:01 PM

JohnnyC: When I was a child, I used to see flocks of birds that would form rather large 'clouds' in the sky. I never see those anymore... I see the occasional flock of birds but nothing like the large flocks I saw when I was young.


That's just cause you don't care anymore and when you were a kid didn't pay attention to when. You may have also moved away from a migratory path which has to do with when.
 
2013-07-09 08:32:21 PM
"They had their chance.  Nature chose them for extinction."
 
2013-07-09 09:11:29 PM
Um...pigeons can carry passengers?
 
2013-07-09 09:14:36 PM

Ambivalence: Um...pigeons can carry passengers?


Sure.  Mites.  Fleas.  Ticks.  Ants.  Molds.  Bacteria.  Various internal parasites, like intestinal worms.  Really, they're more non-bird than bird when you get down to it.
 
2013-07-09 09:29:23 PM
Call me when they bring back the Dodo Bird.

I mean, we're the ones that nixed it...especially since it was so delicious.
It's only fair.
 
2013-07-09 09:52:05 PM

meat0918: Where'd you grow up, and where do you live now?


I grew up in the countryside outside of Kalamazoo (west of). I now live in Fenton, which is a couple hours from there, but I lived in a countryside area near there (south of) for about 2 years a couple of years ago and didn't see any decent sized flocks.

meat0918: I grew up near Saginaw Bay, and the flocks of birds were massive as it was on a major migratory route, and they still are as far as I can tell when I happen to be visiting home when they're migrating.

Fields full of geese, the masses of ducks on the water.  It's amazing.


Yeah. I still see a fair amount of ducks and geese. I was talking more about 'swarm' flocks of thousands upon thousands of birds. I see a lot of ducks and geese around the lake here (also some cranes) but rarely flocks of smaller birds.

Arkanaut: Assuming you're not 100 years old, you might be thinking of the European starling, which tend to flock in large numbers. They're not only still around, they're thriving in North America, where they are an invasive species with no native predators.


Could be. They were small birds. I never saw them up close. There would just be massive flocks of them in the sky.

Intrepid00: That's just cause you don't care anymore and when you were a kid didn't pay attention to when. You may have also moved away from a migratory path which has to do with when.


I still look for flocks in the sky...That's a strange (incorrect) assumption that I don't care though... I would see them in the summer and into the fall. They might have been migrating birds.
 
2013-07-09 09:57:53 PM

Stone Meadow: They sound tasty.


They were, too. The tourtières they make in Quebec from ground pork used to be made from passenger pigeons (tourterelles, doves). Pigeon pie, in other words, but not made with your nasty rock pigeons, but with lean, tender doves.

Seeing as even the cheap pork pies are delicious, the real thing must have been delicious enough to hold the pork industry back for three centuries. Now that is magically delicious!
 
2013-07-09 10:00:21 PM

Ambivalence: Um...pigeons can carry passengers?


And coconuts.
 
2013-07-09 10:06:40 PM
It's always been my fantasy to bring back the passenger pigeon. Say you're a super-villain with a time-portal. Pick up a flock of a billion passenger pigeons migrating in 1600 and bring them into the XXIst century. Can you imagine the panic?

Bwa-ha-ha-ha-ha! Fly my pretties, fly!

And I want a real French Canadian tourtière with gravy, fries and peas. Because I can imagine what that would taste like.

I saw a mourning dove at arm's length once on my way to work, and the passenger pigeon would be a really cool bird to see once again. So kudos to the scientists who are working to bring this really cool bird back. We think a lot alike, us super-villains.
 
2013-07-09 10:16:41 PM

MrHappyRotter: I've seen how this ends.  It turns out these creatures can lay fertile eggs and they're going to kill a lot of innocent people because scientists were too preoccupied with whether they could and never stopped to consider whether they should.


We'll be ok -- they're using a unix system. I know this!
 
2013-07-09 11:13:41 PM
Then we can kill them all again.
 
2013-07-09 11:51:33 PM

JohnnyC: I still look for flocks in the sky...That's a strange (incorrect) assumption that I don't care though... I would see them in the summer and into the fall. They might have been migrating birds.


Do you still live at your childhood home, or have you moved outside the migration pathways?
 
2013-07-10 12:16:16 AM

WelldeadLink: Do you still live at your childhood home, or have you moved outside the migration pathways?


No I don't live at the same house. It's quite possible I don't live in the migration path of any large flocks and haven't since I was a kid, but I remember seeing them in the sky in various places as a child, not just at my house. The only huge flock I've seen that was remotely similar was about 13 years ago when a huge flock of crows (probably a few thousand) landed in an apartment complex I lived in. They were in every tree, on every building, and some flying around. They stuck around for about an hour and then left.

I look for large flocks, especially when I'm out driving through the country in general. I had just come to the conclusion that flocks like that were just a thing of the past or something. They seemed so common back in the early 80's and I just never see them anymore. I suppose it could just be 'bad luck' that I haven't spotted one. I don't know.
 
2013-07-10 12:29:28 AM
Just to be clear... I'm talking about flocks of birds like these:

i901.photobucket.com

i.dailymail.co.uk

That's the kind of thing I'm talking about.
 
2013-07-10 02:53:14 AM

JohnnyC: Just to be clear... I'm talking about flocks of birds like these:

[i901.photobucket.com image 620x413]

[i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x418]

That's the kind of thing I'm talking about.


I heard tell Passender Pigeon flocks lasted for DAYS and blackened out the entire sky. If you had told anyone of the time that within a few years, they'd all be dead, they wouldn't have believed you. It's still an incredibly surreal idea.

The human race seems populous and powerful now, but there's nothing which says it can't go the same way and just as quickly....
 
2013-07-10 04:59:27 AM

JohnnyC: Just to be clear... I'm talking about flocks of birds like these:

[i901.photobucket.com image 620x413]

[i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x418]

That's the kind of thing I'm talking about.


I remember seeing that kind of thing pretty regularly in Alabama.  The migratory birds' patterns have been upset recently--meaning a lot of birds found it unnecessary to migrate.  They came down south and stayed.  Most likely global warming.
 
2013-07-10 07:32:11 AM

JohnnyC: When I was a child, I used to see flocks of birds that would form rather large 'clouds' in the sky. I never see those anymore... I see the occasional flock of birds but nothing like the large flocks I saw when I was young.


Starlings?

/No, I wasn't scared.
 
2013-07-10 07:37:56 AM
So we're bringing back the winged rat to beat all winged rats. 14 days to fledge. ground-nesting. With a strategy of "we're so many you can't kill us all" (which failed, by the way). And this is good... how?

/me be talkin' to these guys -  http://www.metalstorm.com/IRM/content/home.html
//bring it on, passenger flyin' critters
///After shoveling pigeon crap when I moved into my present apartment and having to put up a net to be able to take a vacation... no way
////Would have me some pigeon pie - or some city pigeons if it weren't for all the heavy metals in 'em
//miss my 12-gauge boom stick
 
2013-07-10 08:44:05 AM
I hear Dodo tastes great.
 
Displayed 48 of 48 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report