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(Chicago Trib)   Hundreds of Morsi supporters come out to protest......in Chicago   (chicagotribune.com) divider line 67
    More: Fail, Morsi, Egyptian Military, Chicago, Egypt, Egyptian flag, Egyptian, Magnificent Mile, coups  
•       •       •

1152 clicks; posted to Politics » on 08 Jul 2013 at 5:49 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-08 04:01:40 PM
Well DUH...That town is full of Muslin extremists. Well, not as full now that Obama moved to D.C., but still
 
2013-07-08 04:02:27 PM
Is that kind of like tweeting for your cause?
 
2013-07-08 04:56:50 PM
I was never a fan of The Smiths or his solo stuff.
 
2013-07-08 05:07:18 PM
FAIL?

Chicago's more dangerous than Cairo!
 
2013-07-08 05:33:26 PM
A few hundred cruise missiles would be the best course of action. Miserable shiat hole of a city.
 
2013-07-08 05:35:59 PM

Popcorn Johnny: A few hundred cruise missiles would be the best course of action. Miserable shiat hole of a city.


Good luck with that. The Stanley Cup creates an impenetrable force.
 
2013-07-08 05:37:24 PM
Heaven knows they're miserable now?
 
2013-07-08 05:42:45 PM

Popcorn Johnny: A few hundred cruise missiles would be the best course of action. Miserable shiat hole of a city.


did you set up some sort of alert for whenever a fark headline contains the word "chicago?" because you are really on top of letting everyone know how much you dislike chicago on this site.
 
2013-07-08 05:51:50 PM
deport them. bengali in platforms.
 
2013-07-08 05:52:47 PM
If Morsi and Egypt were so great, why are they in Chicago?
 
2013-07-08 05:54:21 PM
If Obama had sons, they would look like Morsi supporters.
 
2013-07-08 06:00:12 PM
About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.
 ...
Egyptian military officials say the country's acting leadership is preparing for a new round of elections, but many of those gathered Sunday in Chicago fear a return to an autocratic government like the one protesters toppled in 2011.


tfa goes way out if its way to frame this as a military coup and avoid explaining any of the motivations for unseating morsi.
 
2013-07-08 06:08:23 PM
About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.

My biggest question after rtfa is ow does a dude living in the US vote in the Egyptian elections? I know there's dual-citizenship and such but I was under the impression the US doesn't really like it and rarely grants it. Did this dude cast his vote then get the fark outta dodge or something?
 
2013-07-08 06:17:01 PM

thomps: About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.
 ...
Egyptian military officials say the country's acting leadership is preparing for a new round of elections, but many of those gathered Sunday in Chicago fear a return to an autocratic government like the one protesters toppled in 2011.

tfa goes way out if its way to frame this as a military coup and avoid explaining any of the motivations for unseating morsi.


It's not framing, it WAS a military coup.
 
2013-07-08 06:27:11 PM

grumpfuff: About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.

My biggest question after rtfa is ow does a dude living in the US vote in the Egyptian elections? I know there's dual-citizenship and such but I was under the impression the US doesn't really like it and rarely grants it. Did this dude cast his vote then get the fark outta dodge or something?


Absentee ballot.

If you happened to be working in Switzerland, you could still vote in US elections.

Hell, some countries have so many expats living in the US that they allocate parliamentary seats to that community. Eritrea, IIRC, does that.
 
2013-07-08 06:28:39 PM

Philip Francis Queeg: thomps: About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.
 ...
Egyptian military officials say the country's acting leadership is preparing for a new round of elections, but many of those gathered Sunday in Chicago fear a return to an autocratic government like the one protesters toppled in 2011.

tfa goes way out if its way to frame this as a military coup and avoid explaining any of the motivations for unseating morsi.

It's not framing, it WAS a military coup.


But Obama refuses to call it that. He wants to keep the money rolling in for muslim extremists.
 
2013-07-08 06:30:09 PM

Philip Francis Queeg: It's not framing, it WAS a military coup.



Against a democratically elected official who was attempting to silence dissent and concentrate power on his office so he could carry out his agenda without any disruptions.  Morsi may have been elected democratically but his behavior while in office was indicative of a man hellbent on establishing an autocratic office.  While the military intervention doesn't help establish respect for democratic processes and institutions it is no worse than Morsi's own policies which were already undermining respect for democratic processes and institutions.  The military simply removed a budding autocrat and in scheduling fresh elections leaves the door open for a fresh start.
 
2013-07-08 06:35:48 PM

jehovahs witness protection: Philip Francis Queeg: thomps: About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.
 ...
Egyptian military officials say the country's acting leadership is preparing for a new round of elections, but many of those gathered Sunday in Chicago fear a return to an autocratic government like the one protesters toppled in 2011.

tfa goes way out if its way to frame this as a military coup and avoid explaining any of the motivations for unseating morsi.

It's not framing, it WAS a military coup.

But Obama refuses to call it that. He wants to keep the money rolling in for muslim extremists.


patdollard.com

HERP!
 
2013-07-08 06:47:50 PM

JK47: The military simply removed a budding autocrat, dissolved the parliament, suspended the Constitution, rounded up the leadership of a political party, and killed dozens of civilians who protested their actions and in scheduling fresh elections leaves the door open for a fresh start, as long as the end result is something the military leadership approves of.


FTFY
 
2013-07-08 07:04:49 PM

fusillade762: jehovahs witness protection: Philip Francis Queeg: thomps: About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.
 ...
Egyptian military officials say the country's acting leadership is preparing for a new round of elections, but many of those gathered Sunday in Chicago fear a return to an autocratic government like the one protesters toppled in 2011.

tfa goes way out if its way to frame this as a military coup and avoid explaining any of the motivations for unseating morsi.

It's not framing, it WAS a military coup.

But Obama refuses to call it that. He wants to keep the money rolling in for muslim extremists.

[patdollard.com image 550x350]

HERP!


Well, there goes my streak of not ignoring anyone for 10 years on fark.  I always thought it would be PDX_Gary that was first on the list, but it turned out that Joho Witless Protection won the coveted spot with his most recent comment.

CONGRATS!
 
2013-07-08 07:11:31 PM

Philip Francis Queeg: JK47: The military simply removed a budding autocrat, dissolved the  parliament, suspended the Constitution, rounded up the leadership of a political party, and killed dozens of civilians who protested their actions and in scheduling fresh elections leaves the door open for a fresh start, as long as the end result is something the military leadership approves of.

FTFY



Given the first item bolded the last three really matter little...especially since his efforts in shaping them to fit his agenda helped spawn the discontent that triggered his ouster.  I'm curious as to why you'd mention them since they weren't functioning checks on his powers.  Further, since you acknowledged his autocratic tendencies, how did you expect he would be removed from office?  Given his disrespect for dissent, organized opposition, and the constitution itself it is unreasonable to expect that he would bow to the will of another election that removes him from power.  Once in power autocrats tend to stay in power unless forcibly removed.
 
2013-07-08 07:14:18 PM

Philip Francis Queeg: JK47: The military simply removed a budding autocrat, dissolved the parliament, suspended the Constitution, rounded up the leadership of a political party, and killed dozens of civilians who protested their actions and in scheduling fresh elections leaves the door open for a fresh start, as long as the end result is something the military leadership approves of.

FTFY


I liked JK47's original.

/admit i don't know all the details
//Morsi is a little too ... spiritual for my taste.
 
2013-07-08 07:20:02 PM
But, we're still cool with every Cuban immigrant biatching about Castro from the friendly confines of Boca Raton, right?
 
2013-07-08 07:21:25 PM

JK47: Philip Francis Queeg: JK47: The military simply removed a budding autocrat, dissolved the  parliament, suspended the Constitution, rounded up the leadership of a political party, and killed dozens of civilians who protested their actions and in scheduling fresh elections leaves the door open for a fresh start, as long as the end result is something the military leadership approves of.

FTFY


Given the first item bolded the last three really matter little...especially since his efforts in shaping them to fit his agenda helped spawn the discontent that triggered his ouster.  I'm curious as to why you'd mention them since they weren't functioning checks on his powers.  Further, since you acknowledged his autocratic tendencies, how did you expect he would be removed from office?  Given his disrespect for dissent, organized opposition, and the constitution itself it is unreasonable to expect that he would bow to the will of another election that removes him from power.  Once in power autocrats tend to stay in power unless forcibly removed.

What is the check on the power of the Egyptian military? You know, the autocrats currentlyvkilling thiercopposition.
 
2013-07-08 07:26:29 PM
On the one hand, our interests are not served at all by a theocratic hard right fundie Islamic party taking control of the most populous arab nation in the Mediterranean. We would probably better have our own US interests served by a military regime the way they've been for most of the post-colonial era.


On the other hand, the MB *was* elected by the population and he is on many metrics the legitimate leader of Egypt who has indeed been deposed by a military coup.


So by supporting our own interests, we violate our morals. But considering how badly we tend to maul our own morals of freedom and democracy and blah de blah when our interests are at stake, I don't really see the US doing anything it hasn't done before here, either.


Its so odd seeing the Herpy Derpy right saying that by Obama dealing with the democratically elected ruler of Egypt this means he's a Kenyan mooslim. Just when you think the right cant fall off the turnip truck even more... hehe
 
2013-07-08 07:39:23 PM
To me anyway, there is something wrong about allowing people to vote in elections when they are essentially permanent residents in another country.

The problem I see in Egypt is that they're asking the people currently elected to make a government, to enact rules that can't easily be broken or changed in the future. That is a recipe for shenanigans, that those in power will try to enact bad things. Somehow things have to be left to be more fluid so that democracy can evolve over time, maybe by not trying to enact rules that cannot be easily changed but having rules that have to be reaffirmed every year or two.
 
2013-07-08 07:39:39 PM

Philip Francis Queeg: What is the check on the power of the Egyptian military? You know, the autocrats currently killing their opposition.



The military was attempting to check Morsi who wasn't responding to democratic pressures.  Now they need to begin efforts to reconstitute the democratic institutions under a fresh constitution.  If they fail to do so and instead attempt to concentrate power under a military regime then opposition would be justified (just as it was when Morsi was attempting to silence opposition).

Frankly, I don't really see the point of continuing this if you don't respond to my earlier questions.  You're hung up on procedure and form and you're ignoring the fact that Morsi was a proto-dictator whose efforts at concentrating power led to massive unrest.  In such situations there are few good outcomes since he'd already indicated that he would not be swayed by popular dissent.  The military could intervene to restore order, which would at best tacitly support Morsi agenda, or it could require Morsi to accede to popular demands.  In this case the military chose to follow the will of the people as expressed by the massive protests rather than support a regime that was trying to isolate and eliminate the political mechanisms that could oppose it.  Honestly the military seems to have been more responsive to popular demands than an elected regime which is the exact opposite of what one wants or expects in a functioning democracy.
 
2013-07-08 07:45:47 PM

Father_Jack: On the other hand, the MB *was* elected by the population and he is on many metrics the legitimate leader of Egypt who has indeed been deposed by a military coup.



Really needs to be more focus on his actions after he was elected to office.  His efforts at controlling and manipulating the drafting of a constitution and eliminating judicial interference were not encouraging.
 
2013-07-08 07:48:24 PM

thomps: Popcorn Johnny: A few hundred cruise missiles would be the best course of action. Miserable shiat hole of a city.

did you set up some sort of alert for whenever a fark headline contains the word "chicago?" because you are really on top of letting everyone know how much you dislike chicago on this site.


Hey now. The dude's online girlfriend in Chicago turned out to be a guy. I can't say that I blame him.

:'(
 
2013-07-08 07:56:25 PM

jehovahs witness protection: Philip Francis Queeg: thomps: About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.
 ...
Egyptian military officials say the country's acting leadership is preparing for a new round of elections, but many of those gathered Sunday in Chicago fear a return to an autocratic government like the one protesters toppled in 2011.

tfa goes way out if its way to frame this as a military coup and avoid explaining any of the motivations for unseating morsi.

It's not framing, it WAS a military coup.

But Obama refuses to call it that. He wants to keep the money rolling in for muslim extremists.


Wait... so, by 'letting' the last elections take place that put Morsi in charge, Obama was supporting muslim extremists, ie. the Muslim Brotherhood. Now that he's 'letting' things play out again, he's again supporting muslim extremists.

Just curious how a conservative would have handled things in Egypt the past 3 years that would not be considered supporting muslim extemists?

*crickets*
 
2013-07-08 07:56:41 PM

JK47: Philip Francis Queeg: What is the check on the power of the Egyptian military? You know, the autocrats currently killing their opposition.


The military was attempting to check Morsi who wasn't responding to democratic pressures.  Now they need to begin efforts to reconstitute the democratic institutions under a fresh constitution.  If they fail to do so and instead attempt to concentrate power under a military regime then opposition would be justified (just as it was when Morsi was attempting to silence opposition).

Frankly, I don't really see the point of continuing this if you don't respond to my earlier questions.  You're hung up on procedure and form and you're ignoring the fact that Morsi was a proto-dictator whose efforts at concentrating power led to massive unrest.  In such situations there are few good outcomes since he'd already indicated that he would not be swayed by popular dissent.  The military could intervene to restore order, which would at best tacitly support Morsi agenda, or it could require Morsi to accede to popular demands.  In this case the military chose to follow the will of the people as expressed by the massive protests rather than support a regime that was trying to isolate and eliminate the political mechanisms that could oppose it.  Honestly the military seems to have been more responsive to popular demands than an elected regime which is the exact opposite of what one wants or expects in a functioning democracy.


The Egyptian military is concentrating power and silencing the opposition even as we speak. All political power in Egypt is in their hands. Dozens of civilians protesting the coup have been shot dead, hundreds wounded.

You are so very, very concerned about the check's on Morsi's power, yet celebrate the unchecked and brutal show of power byu the Egyptian military. Do you believe that if there are future elections in Egypt that any elected leader will dare cross the military in the slightest way? This coup makes any future election a sham, window dressing for the same military rule that Egypt has been under for decades. Many people are fine with that. I am not.
 
2013-07-08 08:07:33 PM

Philip Francis Queeg: JK47: Philip Francis Queeg: What is the check on the power of the Egyptian military? You know, the autocrats currently killing their opposition.


The military was attempting to check Morsi who wasn't responding to democratic pressures.  Now they need to begin efforts to reconstitute the democratic institutions under a fresh constitution.  If they fail to do so and instead attempt to concentrate power under a military regime then opposition would be justified (just as it was when Morsi was attempting to silence opposition).

Frankly, I don't really see the point of continuing this if you don't respond to my earlier questions.  You're hung up on procedure and form and you're ignoring the fact that Morsi was a proto-dictator whose efforts at concentrating power led to massive unrest.  In such situations there are few good outcomes since he'd already indicated that he would not be swayed by popular dissent.  The military could intervene to restore order, which would at best tacitly support Morsi agenda, or it could require Morsi to accede to popular demands.  In this case the military chose to follow the will of the people as expressed by the massive protests rather than support a regime that was trying to isolate and eliminate the political mechanisms that could oppose it.  Honestly the military seems to have been more responsive to popular demands than an elected regime which is the exact opposite of what one wants or expects in a functioning democracy.

The Egyptian military is concentrating power and silencing the opposition even as we speak. All political power in Egypt is in their hands. Dozens of civilians protesting the coup have been shot dead, hundreds wounded.

You are so very, very concerned about the check's on Morsi's power, yet celebrate the unchecked and brutal show of power byu the Egyptian military. Do you believe that if there are future elections in Egypt that any elected leader will dare cross the military in the slightest way? This coup makes any ...


It seems to me, at least in part, that the military is aware of the very attempts at concentrating power that Morsi and the muslim brotherhood were attempting in the goal of creating an islamist theocratic state that you are worried about them doing themselves. Morsi's supporters, generally speaking, appear to be nothing more that islamist extremists and it seems the military has no love for them. Frankly, I'm fine with that. A democracy that does not protect the rights of all is no democracy regardless of how it was 'elected'.
 
2013-07-08 08:12:43 PM
http://www.brecorder.com/business-a-finance/banking-a-finance/126719-e gypt-central-bank-governor-flies-to-abu-dhabi.html
The United Arab Emirates pledged $3 billion in aid for Egypt in 2011 that has yet to be delivered. In May of this year it said it would take time for the money to be transferred.

Qatar has lent Egypt more than $7 billion since Mursi was elected president a year ago, but other Gulf countries have remained aloof. Analysts said they were wary of Mursi's Muslim Brotherhood.

sounds like the brotherhoods got no credit, thats why they gone
 
2013-07-08 08:15:29 PM

theknuckler_33: Philip Francis Queeg: JK47: Philip Francis Queeg: What is the check on the power of the Egyptian military? You know, the autocrats currently killing their opposition.


The military was attempting to check Morsi who wasn't responding to democratic pressures.  Now they need to begin efforts to reconstitute the democratic institutions under a fresh constitution.  If they fail to do so and instead attempt to concentrate power under a military regime then opposition would be justified (just as it was when Morsi was attempting to silence opposition).

Frankly, I don't really see the point of continuing this if you don't respond to my earlier questions.  You're hung up on procedure and form and you're ignoring the fact that Morsi was a proto-dictator whose efforts at concentrating power led to massive unrest.  In such situations there are few good outcomes since he'd already indicated that he would not be swayed by popular dissent.  The military could intervene to restore order, which would at best tacitly support Morsi agenda, or it could require Morsi to accede to popular demands.  In this case the military chose to follow the will of the people as expressed by the massive protests rather than support a regime that was trying to isolate and eliminate the political mechanisms that could oppose it.  Honestly the military seems to have been more responsive to popular demands than an elected regime which is the exact opposite of what one wants or expects in a functioning democracy.

The Egyptian military is concentrating power and silencing the opposition even as we speak. All political power in Egypt is in their hands. Dozens of civilians protesting the coup have been shot dead, hundreds wounded.

You are so very, very concerned about the check's on Morsi's power, yet celebrate the unchecked and brutal show of power byu the Egyptian military. Do you believe that if there are future elections in Egypt that any elected leader will dare cross the military in the slightest way ...


So you believe a government should protect the rights of all AND brutally kill civilian protesters from groups you don't like.  You may want to think about that a bit more.
 
2013-07-08 08:24:07 PM

Philip Francis Queeg: JK47: Philip Francis Queeg: What is the check on the power of the Egyptian military? You know, the autocrats currently killing their opposition.


The military was attempting to check Morsi who wasn't responding to democratic pressures.  Now they need to begin efforts to reconstitute the democratic institutions under a fresh constitution.  If they fail to do so and instead attempt to concentrate power under a military regime then opposition would be justified (just as it was when Morsi was attempting to silence opposition).

Frankly, I don't really see the point of continuing this if you don't respond to my earlier questions.  You're hung up on procedure and form and you're ignoring the fact that Morsi was a proto-dictator whose efforts at concentrating power led to massive unrest.  In such situations there are few good outcomes since he'd already indicated that he would not be swayed by popular dissent.  The military could intervene to restore order, which would at best tacitly support Morsi agenda, or it could require Morsi to accede to popular demands.  In this case the military chose to follow the will of the people as expressed by the massive protests rather than support a regime that was trying to isolate and eliminate the political mechanisms that could oppose it.  Honestly the military seems to have been more responsive to popular demands than an elected regime which is the exact opposite of what one wants or expects in a functioning democracy.

The Egyptian military is concentrating power and silencing the opposition even as we speak. All political power in Egypt is in their hands. Dozens of civilians protesting the coup have been shot dead, hundreds wounded.

You are so very, very concerned about the check's on Morsi's power, yet celebrate the unchecked and brutal show of power byu the Egyptian military. Do you believe that if there are future elections in Egypt that any elected leader will dare cross the military in the slightest way? This coup makes any ...


Paraphrasing/expanding from an earlier thread:

If democracy doesn't provide liberty under law, then it's not worth having.

Even though Morsi was democratically elected, he altered the constitution and selectively enforced the laws so as to oppress minorities and ensure the Muslim Brotherhood would continue to have a monopoly on power.  Better to have the military in and reboot the process.
 
2013-07-08 08:26:54 PM

Philip Francis Queeg: So you believe a government should protect the rights of all AND brutally kill civilian protesters from groups you don't like.  You may want to think about that a bit more.


Because a transition to democracy has to be neat and clean, or else you don't get to have it!

Heaven forbid there be bloodshed in the fight for freedom and democracy, or PFQ will have to clutch his pearls!

P.S. from what I've read, a lot of those protesters were armed.
 
2013-07-08 08:33:25 PM

Philip Francis Queeg: So you believe a government should protect the rights of all AND brutally kill civilian protesters from groups you don't like. You may want to think about that a bit more.


You should take your own advice. The Morsi government did not appear headed towards protecting the rights of all, hence the massive protests. The Morsi supporters seem to be supporting a government that did not want to protect the rights of all.  While a military takeover isn't exactly the ideal way to deal with people like that, it certainly beats the alternative. Unless you think a 'democratically elected' extremist theocracy that will be a breeding ground for terrorism and a discriminator, at the very least, against infidels is a good thing in the name of 'democratic elections'.
 
2013-07-08 08:39:30 PM
I think more people die of violence in Chicago than in Egypt on a daily basis, so they need all the protesting they can get.
 
2013-07-08 08:44:00 PM

cameroncrazy1984: Philip Francis Queeg: So you believe a government should protect the rights of all AND brutally kill civilian protesters from groups you don't like.  You may want to think about that a bit more.

Because a transition to democracy has to be neat and clean, or else you don't get to have it!

Heaven forbid there be bloodshed in the fight for freedom and democracy, or PFQ will have to clutch his pearls!

P.S. from what I've read, a lot of those protesters were armed


The fact that you believe that the,Egyptian military is fighting for freedom and democracy is both amazing and pathetic.
 
2013-07-08 08:44:46 PM

LemSkroob: I think more people die of violence in Chicago than in Egypt on a daily basis, so they need all the protesting they can get.


Of course, we're not getting any 'death by violence outside of political protests' statistics from Egypt, so your false comparison is false.
 
2013-07-08 09:28:28 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-07-08 09:30:27 PM
Hundreds of Morsi supporters come out to protest......in Chicago

t's marginally safer than Cairo.
 
2013-07-08 09:59:51 PM
Fisal Hammouda, who left Egypt in the 1960s and now lives in Lisle, helped organize Sunday's rally and led chants of "Only president is Morsi."

i42.tinypic.com
 
2013-07-08 10:19:13 PM

Agneska: If Obama had sons, they would look like Morsi supporters.


If my Aunt was a man she'd be my Uncle.
 
2013-07-08 10:33:26 PM

theknuckler_33: jehovahs witness protection: Philip Francis Queeg: thomps: About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.
 ...
Egyptian military officials say the country's acting leadership is preparing for a new round of elections, but many of those gathered Sunday in Chicago fear a return to an autocratic government like the one protesters toppled in 2011.

tfa goes way out if its way to frame this as a military coup and avoid explaining any of the motivations for unseating morsi.

It's not framing, it WAS a military coup.

But Obama refuses to call it that. He wants to keep the money rolling in for muslim extremists.

Wait... so, by 'letting' the last elections take place that put Morsi in charge, Obama was supporting muslim extremists, ie. the Muslim Brotherhood. Now that he's 'letting' things play out again, he's again supporting muslim extremists.

Just curious how a conservative would have handled things in Egypt the past 3 years that would not be considered supporting muslim extemists?

*crickets*


Well, they seem OK with installing brutal puppet dictators as long as they're 'Pro America' and funnel money into corporate pockets.
 
2013-07-08 10:47:50 PM

LordJiro: theknuckler_33: jehovahs witness protection: But Obama refuses to call it that. He wants to keep the money rolling in for muslim extremists.

Wait... so, by 'letting' the last elections take place that put Morsi in charge, Obama was supporting muslim extremists, ie. the Muslim Brotherhood. Now that he's 'letting' things play out again, he's again supporting muslim extremists.

Just curious how a conservative would have handled things in Egypt the past 3 years that would not be considered supporting muslim extemists?

*crickets*

Well, they seem OK with installing brutal puppet dictators as long as they're 'Pro America' and funnel money into corporate pockets.


I'll assume the first "they" refers to those like the one I quoted.
 
2013-07-08 11:24:10 PM
More people in Chicago came to a pro-Morsi rally than the restore the fourth rally.
 
2013-07-08 11:40:16 PM

theknuckler_33: jehovahs witness protection: Philip Francis Queeg: thomps: About a year ago, Wael Elfeqy waited in a long line to cast his ballot for Egypt's first democratically elected president. His candidate, Mohammed Morsi, won the election but was removed from office and jailed last week when the military seized power.
 ...
Egyptian military officials say the country's acting leadership is preparing for a new round of elections, but many of those gathered Sunday in Chicago fear a return to an autocratic government like the one protesters toppled in 2011.

tfa goes way out if its way to frame this as a military coup and avoid explaining any of the motivations for unseating morsi.

It's not framing, it WAS a military coup.

But Obama refuses to call it that. He wants to keep the money rolling in for muslim extremists.

Wait... so, by 'letting' the last elections take place that put Morsi in charge, Obama was supporting muslim extremists, ie. the Muslim Brotherhood. Now that he's 'letting' things play out again, he's again supporting muslim extremists.

Just curious how a conservative would have handled things in Egypt the past 3 years that would not be considered supporting muslim extemists?

*crickets*


Yeah, I'm so confused. Morsi was roundly reviled when he came to power--after Mubarak was overthrown--because it was seen as letting the terrorists (aka the Muslim Brotherhood, who were seen as a front for the Islamic Jihad) take control of Egypt. NOW, suddenly, because Morsi was democratically elected, and the military removed him from power; NOW we should be supporting him and his Muslim Brotherhood/Islamic Jihad backers because democracy.

And, I'll point out, the reason the military stepped in is because Morsi did what the right-wingers are so scared Obama is going to do--suspend free elections for "the good of the nation" (meaning him). So Morsi was acting like a dictator--but America should support him merely because he was democratically elected--although he is/was a muslim extremist--but something.

And apparently whatever the Egyptian PEOPLE want is dead wrong, whatever else we may say.
 
2013-07-09 12:07:23 AM

Gyrfalcon: Just curious how a conservative would have handled things in Egypt the past 3 years that would not be considered supporting muslim extemists?

*crickets*

Yeah, I'm so confused. Morsi was roundly reviled when he came to power--after Mubarak was overthrown--because it was seen as letting the terrorists (aka the Muslim Brotherhood, who were seen as a front for the Islamic Jihad) take control of Egypt. NOW, suddenly, because Morsi was democratically elected, and the military removed him from power; NOW we should be supporting him and his Muslim Brotherhood/Islamic Jihad backers because democracy.

And, I'll point out, the reason the military stepped in is because Morsi did what the right-wingers are so scared Obama is going to do--suspend free elections for "the good of the nation" (meaning him). So Morsi was acting like a dictator--but America should support him merely because he was democratically elected--although he is/was a muslim extremist--but something.

And apparently whatever the Egyptian PEOPLE want is dead wrong, whatever else we may say.


I don't think it has anything at all to do with the Egyptian people and everything to do with hating Obama. biatch, crackers, etc.
 
2013-07-09 01:19:04 AM

jehovahs witness protection: Well, not as full now that Obama moved to D.C.


Bye troll

*plonk*
 
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