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(Ars Technica)   New theory for mysterious bursts of radio waves points to the 'blitzar,' a black hole which emits massive amounts of electromagnetic noise and fails horribly on Jeopardy   (arstechnica.com) divider line 39
    More: Interesting, risks  
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2674 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jul 2013 at 1:39 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-08 01:40:30 PM
get it together blitzar..
 
2013-07-08 01:42:12 PM
images.huffingtonpost.com
 
2013-07-08 01:42:26 PM
Kugelblitz?


/Robinette Broadhead and S. Ya. Lavorovna approve
 
2013-07-08 01:43:11 PM
I am betting Noori and the kooks will be talking about this on the radio tonight.
 
2013-07-08 01:46:36 PM
farm3.static.flickr.com
 
2013-07-08 01:52:12 PM
As much as this author seems to know what he is talking about, I don't think he knows exactly what he's talking about.
Just as an example, I don't think it's possible for a gassious body, like a star, for instance, to have a magnetic field.  When you think about it, there wouldn't be any sort of a chance for magnetic interactions to start with because the gravatational pull from the leftover neutron star, or resulting black hole, would so completely overpower it as to make it completely inconsequential.

And he's also leaving out the fact that when a supernova occurs, a helluva lot of newly forged elements tend to propogate the universe.  You could almost say that they could create an entirely new solar system.  And by the way...  That IS how it works.
 
2013-07-08 01:53:20 PM
Paging the Bad Astronomer!
 
2013-07-08 01:59:03 PM

durbnpoisn: Just as an example, I don't think it's possible for a gassious body, like a star, for instance, to have a magnetic field.


justanothertimewastingwebsite.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-07-08 02:00:27 PM

durbnpoisn: As much as this author seems to know what he is talking about, I don't think he knows exactly what he's talking about.
Just as an example, I don't think it's possible for a gassious body, like a star, for instance, to have a magnetic field.


You think wrong. Stars have immense magnetic fields, pretty much all of their surface features are driven by them. The whole way we knew Voyager 1 had crossed into interstellar space was that it stopped detecting the sun's magnetic field and started to detect that of other stars.
 
2013-07-08 02:00:36 PM

durbnpoisn: As much as this author seems to know what he is talking about, I don't think he knows exactly what he's talking about.  Just as an example, I don't think it's possible for a gassious body, like a star, for instance, to have a magnetic field.


Seriously?

When you think about it, there wouldn't be any sort of a chance for magnetic interactions to start with because the gravatational pull from the leftover neutron star, or resulting black hole, would so completely overpower it as to make it completely inconsequential.

I have no idea what this means.  Yes, neutron stars and black holes have strong gravity.  No, this doesn't preclude also having a strong magnetic field.

And he's also leaving out the fact that when a supernova occurs, a helluva lot of newly forged elements tend to propogate the universe.

What does that have to do with anything in the article?
 
2013-07-08 02:06:06 PM
Okay, okay...  I was seriously under the impression (wrongly, apparently), that you needed to have some sort of metal in order to generate a magnetic field.  Something along the lines of say, a planet with a molten core.

So I appoligize for my ignorance.
 
2013-07-08 02:12:31 PM
Surprisingly, no mention of your mama in that article.
 
2013-07-08 02:13:51 PM

durbnpoisn: Okay, okay...  I was seriously under the impression (wrongly, apparently), that you needed to have some sort of metal in order to generate a magnetic field.  Something along the lines of say, a planet with a molten core.

So I appoligize for my ignorance.


Just blame your homeschooling and show off a picture of your beautiful teeth
 
2013-07-08 02:15:06 PM

durbnpoisn: Okay, okay...  I was seriously under the impression (wrongly, apparently), that you needed to have some sort of metal in order to generate a magnetic field.

Something along the lines of say, a planet with a molten core.

Stellar magnetic fields operate somewhat similarly to planetary magnetic fields.  The magnetic dynamo is based on a rotating, convecting, conductive fluid.  Molten metal in a planetary core can do this.  But so can plasma in a star.  See magnetohydrodynamics.

By the way, stars contain tons of metal (and other elements), as you yourself point out.  (But that's not what causes a stellar magnetic field.)
 
2013-07-08 02:15:49 PM

Hevach: durbnpoisn: As much as this author seems to know what he is talking about, I don't think he knows exactly what he's talking about.
Just as an example, I don't think it's possible for a gassious body, like a star, for instance, to have a magnetic field.

You think wrong. Stars have immense magnetic fields, pretty much all of their surface features are driven by them. The whole way we knew Voyager 1 had crossed into interstellar space was that it stopped detecting the sun's magnetic field and started to detect that of other stars.


Also, ionized plasma is not a gas.

The sun is a miasma of incandecent plasma
 
2013-07-08 02:17:15 PM

durbnpoisn: Okay, okay...  I was seriously under the impression (wrongly, apparently), that you needed to have some sort of metal in order to generate a magnetic field.  Something along the lines of say, a planet with a molten core.

So I appoligize for my ignorance.


Hydrogen becomes a metal under high pressure, I think thats whats at jupiters core.
 
2013-07-08 02:18:54 PM
Magnetic fields are caused by accelerating charged particles. A plasma consists of 100% charged particles. The sun is ~100% plasma, which is accelerating due to multiple sources.
 
2013-07-08 02:23:42 PM

FrancoFile: Kugelblitz?


/Robinette Broadhead and S. Ya. Lavorovna approve


Captain disagrees.
 
2013-07-08 02:35:34 PM

durbnpoisn: Okay, okay...  I was seriously under the impression (wrongly, apparently), that you needed to have some sort of metal in order to generate a magnetic field.  Something along the lines of say, a planet with a molten core.

So I appoligize for my ignorance.


Hydrogen is metallic at high pressures. Also, the movement of ionized gas (i.e. plasma, or what most of the Sun is made of) also creates a magnetic field.

As for neutron stars, the outer crust would be made of metal, and not neutrons, and this outer crust is where the magnetic field is generated - also, in-falling gas gets ionized, as well.
 
2013-07-08 02:35:55 PM
Haha...  Fark is mean as hell when you say something in ignorance.  I should probably be used to this by now...

Who says you don't learn something new every day?

What did I learn today?  Well, stars can generate a magnetic field just as efficiently, if not more than a planet with a molten core.  Or even something like Jupiter, of which the surface and interior are pretty much still a mystery.

Why I find this a bit surprising is that much of the radiation that is belched off of our sun doesn't fry us to death instantly, because of the magnetic field generated by the Earth's internal engine.
 
2013-07-08 02:39:10 PM
Once rotation slows enough, the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff limit will kick in, and the SURON will collapse into a black hole in a matter of milliseconds.

Blitzar? More like Brazzers, amiright?
 
2013-07-08 02:43:19 PM
Woah. I've read two genuinely interesting articles on Fark today.

Crazy black holes and weird shiat in an underground lake under miles of ice.

Am...am I in some weird black hole? What's going on here?
 
2013-07-08 02:54:45 PM
SURONs. Blitzars. The universe is so f*cking cool.
 
2013-07-08 02:56:03 PM

MrBallou: FrancoFile: Kugelblitz?


/Robinette Broadhead and S. Ya. Lavorovna approve

Captain disagrees.


Captain is an antisocial sanctimonious prick and can go suck on a container of CHON food.
 
2013-07-08 03:03:32 PM

megarian: Woah. I've read two genuinely interesting articles on Fark today.

Crazy black holes and weird shiat in an underground lake under miles of ice.

Am...am I in some weird black hole? What's going on here?


Where is this underground lake article?
 
2013-07-08 03:03:32 PM

durbnpoisn: Haha...  Fark is mean as hell when you say something in ignorance.  I should probably be used to this by now...

Who says you don't learn something new every day?

What did I learn today?  Well, stars can generate a magnetic field just as efficiently, if not more than a planet with a molten core.  Or even something like Jupiter, of which the surface and interior are pretty much still a mystery.

Why I find this a bit surprising is that much of the radiation that is belched off of our sun doesn't fry us to death instantly, because of the magnetic field generated by the Earth's internal engine.



Around here we don't reward intelligence... we punish ignorance.
 
2013-07-08 03:08:44 PM

verbaltoxin: Where is this underground lake article?


Here.
 
2013-07-08 03:13:31 PM

FrancoFile: MrBallou: FrancoFile: Kugelblitz?


/Robinette Broadhead and S. Ya. Lavorovna approve

Captain disagrees.

Captain is an antisocial sanctimonious prick and can go suck on a container of CHON food.


See Sigmund? Fark is making me quite antisocial.
 
2013-07-08 03:19:13 PM

verbaltoxin: megarian: Woah. I've read two genuinely interesting articles on Fark today.

Crazy black holes and weird shiat in an underground lake under miles of ice.

Am...am I in some weird black hole? What's going on here?

Where is this underground lake article?


Two below this one on the main page.

Headline:
There's something alive buried under the ice in Antarctica. I dunno what the hell's in there, but it's weird and pissed off, whatever it is
 
2013-07-08 03:20:06 PM

Ambitwistor: verbaltoxin: Where is this underground lake article?

Here.


...Or I could have been a non-asshole. Thanks :)
 
2013-07-08 03:23:55 PM

durbnpoisn: Haha... Fark is mean as hell when you say something in ignorance.


When you don't know something, ask a question.
When you do know something, make a statement.
benjaminday.files.wordpress.com
The problem is when you don't know that you don't know something.
Then you're just set up for failure and mockery.
 
2013-07-08 03:26:45 PM
The authors of the paper describing these bodies, Heino Falcke and Luciano Rezzolla, call them supramassive rotating neutron stars, or SURONs.
fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net
 
2013-07-08 04:07:08 PM

Theaetetus: durbnpoisn: Haha... Fark is mean as hell when you say something in ignorance.

When you don't know something, ask a question.
When you do know something, make a statement.
[benjaminday.files.wordpress.com image 300x243]
The problem is when you don't know that you don't know something.
Then you're just set up for failure and mockery.


Ignorance can be a good thing if you have the self-awareness to take steps to correct it.
 
2013-07-08 04:22:56 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
US Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee
 
2013-07-08 04:56:25 PM

Hevach: The whole way we knew Voyager 1 had crossed into interstellar space was that it stopped detecting the sun's magnetic field and started to detect that of other stars.


Slight correction:  Voyager 1 is not yet in interstellar space.  It's entered an area of space astronomers have named the heliosheath depletion zone.
 
2013-07-08 05:07:44 PM

durbnpoisn: Haha...  Fark is mean as hell when you say something in ignorance.  I should probably be used to this by now...

Who says you don't learn something new every day?

What did I learn today?  Well, stars can generate a magnetic field just as efficiently, if not more than a planet with a molten core.  Or even something like Jupiter, of which the surface and interior are pretty much still a mystery.

Why I find this a bit surprising is that much of the radiation that is belched off of our sun doesn't fry us to death instantly, because of the magnetic field generated by the Earth's internal engine.


Yes, but it is all blind luck, all of these things that make life possible here.

Also, why admit ignorance?
A lesser person would have just pretended to troll the out-of-work and over qualified scientists.

/good on ya!
 
2013-07-08 06:19:56 PM
This headline made me laugh.  Just figured I'd share.
 
2013-07-08 09:11:32 PM
Are YOU calling ME a black hole?

www.claus.com
 
2013-07-08 09:13:23 PM
As opposed to the Richtar which quietly revolves around other stars, eating them slowly up.
 
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