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(Al Jazeera)   After the Obama administration fails to condemn the Egyptian military 'coup', one has to ask if it can defend democracy in Egypt?   (aljazeera.com) divider line 33
    More: Interesting, Egyptian Military, Egypt, Egyptian, Obama, United States, democracy in Egypt, Obama administration, PJ Crowley  
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254 clicks; posted to Politics » on 08 Jul 2013 at 12:05 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-08 12:05:38 PM  
Military coups are when the military takes over everything.

Handing Presidential power to a civilian isnt a coup, it is a Revolution.
 
2013-07-08 12:05:58 PM  
Though he was democratically elected, Morsi has hardly ruled democratically.  He has issued multiple unilateral decrees expanding the scope of his office in order to suppress dissenting opinion and paved the way for an Egyptian theocracy.  In such a case, a coup might actually advance democratic ideals.
 
2013-07-08 12:06:54 PM  

cman: Military coups are when the military takes over everything.

Handing Presidential power to a civilian isnt a coup, it is a Revolution.



Knowing the difference could save you a few trillion dollars and American lives.
 
2013-07-08 12:09:38 PM  

cman: Military coups are when the military takes over everything.

Handing Presidential power to a civilian isnt a coup, it is a Revolution.


They handed a title to a civilian, not power.
 
2013-07-08 12:10:50 PM  

mysticcat: Though he was democratically elected, Morsi has hardly ruled democratically.  He has issued multiple unilateral decrees expanding the scope of his office in order to suppress dissenting opinion and paved the way for an Egyptian theocracy.  In such a case, a coup might actually advance democratic ideals.


But but but electeddddddd
 
2013-07-08 12:11:03 PM  
The military pulled a "coup" the first time around. No one biatched. Why the complaining this time?
 
2013-07-08 12:12:00 PM  

mysticcat: Though he was democratically elected, Morsi has hardly ruled democratically.  He has issued multiple unilateral decrees expanding the scope of his office in order to suppress dissenting opinion and paved the way for an Egyptian theocracy.  In such a case, a coup might actually advance democratic ideals.


That.
 
2013-07-08 12:14:29 PM  
As Washington fails to condemn the military coup, we ask if it can defend democracy in Egypt.

Why is that our job?
 
2013-07-08 12:14:31 PM  

cameroncrazy1984: mysticcat: Though he was democratically elected, Morsi has hardly ruled democratically.  He has issued multiple unilateral decrees expanding the scope of his office in order to suppress dissenting opinion and paved the way for an Egyptian theocracy.  In such a case, a coup might actually advance democratic ideals.

But but but electeddddddd


I am quite surprised that this hasn't become a meme.

Morsi screamed "Legitimacy" in a way that would make Steve "Developers" Ballmer blush
 
2013-07-08 12:17:09 PM  
Call it a democratic recall supported by the military and you are all set
 
2013-07-08 12:17:28 PM  
Wow. Al Jazeera advocating the US get more involved, militarily, in the Middle East...

...because critics, including noted pacifist beatnik John McCain, see an opportunity to whine about Snobamao.

Scramble the jets. Deploy the Marine Core.
 
2013-07-08 12:20:03 PM  

mysticcat: Though he was democratically elected, Morsi has hardly ruled democratically.  He has issued multiple unilateral decrees expanding the scope of his office in order to suppress dissenting opinion and paved the way for an Egyptian theocracy.  In such a case, a coup might actually advance democratic ideals.


You know, I seem to recall a certain "alien and sedition act" from a particular young democracy.  Not that it justifies the people doing it, just that free speech is a hard concept to come to terms with.  A lot of people in the US still don't get it, and we invented it as a human right.
 
2013-07-08 12:21:04 PM  
So Morsi shows that he's going to be a dictator, and the military ousts him after a revolt and by not denouncing it, O isn't supporting democracy? The only thing O said was that the future depends on the next round of elections. This is the only possible thing to say. We didn't take sides, and we are letting it play out. What's with some folks and insisting that the US take a side in this?
 
2013-07-08 12:21:56 PM  
The best thing the US can do is stay the fark out of other peoples' attempts at democracy.

We've done way too much meddling in other countries and their business.
 
2013-07-08 12:25:11 PM  

PC LOAD LETTER: So Morsi shows that he's going to be a dictator, and the military ousts him after a revolt and by not denouncing it, O isn't supporting democracy? The only thing O said was that the future depends on the next round of elections. This is the only possible thing to say. We didn't take sides, and we are letting it play out. What's with some folks and insisting that the US take a side in this?


The issue is we give the Egyptian military $1.5b a year but we also don't give money to countries that have had their government overthrown by military coup. I personally would be fine with stopping those payments until Egypt gets its shiat together even though I think the coup was the right thing to do.
 
2013-07-08 12:26:16 PM  

mysticcat: Though he was democratically elected, Morsi has hardly ruled democratically.  He has issued multiple unilateral decrees expanding the scope of his office in order to suppress dissenting opinion and paved the way for an Egyptian theocracy.  In such a case, a coup might actually advance democratic ideals.


Yeah, aren't we supposed to support the will of the people when a dictator hiding behind a sham democracy is removed from power?

Hell, in Iraq, we even provided the means. Why is it suddenly bad when Oba....


Oh, never mind. Got it. Sorry, Monday morning and all...
 
2013-07-08 12:27:32 PM  
Egypt for 60 years has been a military dictatorship, and it remains one.
 
2013-07-08 12:27:56 PM  

whidbey: The best thing the US can do is stay the fark out of other peoples' attempts at democracy.

We've done way too much meddling in other countries and their business.


The only dictator I can think of from the past 100 years whose position wasn't solidified by US meddling was Hitler.
Every other dictator(that I can remember) has at least a tangible connection to US meddling or the response to US meddling.  From Stalinists and our support of the white army, all the way through the ayatollahss, and our backing up of the Shah.  Meddling hasn't been good.
 
2013-07-08 12:29:03 PM  

PC LOAD LETTER: So Morsi shows that he's going to be a dictator, and the military ousts him after a revolt and by not denouncing it, O isn't supporting democracy? The only thing O said was that the future depends on the next round of elections. This is the only possible thing to say. We didn't take sides, and we are letting it play out. What's with some folks and insisting that the US take a side in this?



Morsi's major power grabs were with the judiciary -- who were appointed by, guess who, the military dictatorship.
 
2013-07-08 12:29:42 PM  

mysticcat: Though he was democratically elected, Morsi has hardly ruled democratically.  He has issued multiple unilateral decrees expanding the scope of his office in order to suppress dissenting opinion and paved the way for an Egyptian theocracy.  In such a case, a coup might actually advance democratic ideals.


Pretty much what would happen here, if by some craziness, Michelle Bachman or somebody of her ilk ever got elected president.
 
2013-07-08 12:30:21 PM  

DarnoKonrad: PC LOAD LETTER: So Morsi shows that he's going to be a dictator, and the military ousts him after a revolt and by not denouncing it, O isn't supporting democracy? The only thing O said was that the future depends on the next round of elections. This is the only possible thing to say. We didn't take sides, and we are letting it play out. What's with some folks and insisting that the US take a side in this?


Morsi's major power grabs were with the judiciary -- who were appointed by, guess who, the military dictatorship.


Which clearly makes Morsi's dictatorship OK.
 
2013-07-08 12:34:53 PM  

theknuckler_33: As Washington fails to condemn the military coup, we ask if it can defend democracy in Egypt.

Why is that our job?


Probably because we give Egypt $1.3 billion per year (much of it going to the military), and our laws dictate that when a country we aid commits a military coup, we have to stop giving them aid.  However, the military controls much of the shipping routes in that region, and that's something we want access to.
 
2013-07-08 12:38:12 PM  

mgshamster: theknuckler_33: As Washington fails to condemn the military coup, we ask if it can defend democracy in Egypt.

Why is that our job?

Probably because we give Egypt $1.3 billion per year (much of it going to the military), and our laws dictate that when a country we aid commits a military coup, we have to stop giving them aid.  However, the military controls much of the shipping routes in that region, and that's something we want access to.


Pesky laws.  A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.
 
2013-07-08 12:40:45 PM  

odinsposse: PC LOAD LETTER: So Morsi shows that he's going to be a dictator, and the military ousts him after a revolt and by not denouncing it, O isn't supporting democracy? The only thing O said was that the future depends on the next round of elections. This is the only possible thing to say. We didn't take sides, and we are letting it play out. What's with some folks and insisting that the US take a side in this?

The issue is we give the Egyptian military $1.5b a year but we also don't give money to countries that have had their government overthrown by military coup. I personally would be fine with stopping those payments until Egypt gets its shiat together even though I think the coup was the right thing to do.


Well, it does keep the military less anti-American. I guess we need to know we have someone in our pocket or whatever.
 
2013-07-08 12:40:58 PM  

cameroncrazy1984: DarnoKonrad: PC LOAD LETTER: So Morsi shows that he's going to be a dictator, and the military ousts him after a revolt and by not denouncing it, O isn't supporting democracy? The only thing O said was that the future depends on the next round of elections. This is the only possible thing to say. We didn't take sides, and we are letting it play out. What's with some folks and insisting that the US take a side in this?


Morsi's major power grabs were with the judiciary -- who were appointed by, guess who, the military dictatorship.

Which clearly makes Morsi's dictatorship OK.



Actually Morsi was calling for elections, which were stopped by, guess who, the judiciary.   Like I said, you're way too emotional invested in this for some reason to see how military coups are not going to help get rid of a military dictatorship.
 
2013-07-08 02:01:18 PM  
Well billions(trillions) of dollars, francs, pounds, rubles, and renminbi have not poured into the Middle East for the last 80 years to promote democracy.

/Tell me again, which party is it that's supposed to think that Pres. Obama is the messiah?
 
2013-07-08 02:48:36 PM  

ikanreed: whidbey: The best thing the US can do is stay the fark out of other peoples' attempts at democracy.

We've done way too much meddling in other countries and their business.

The only dictator I can think of from the past 100 years whose position wasn't solidified by US meddling was Hitler.
Every other dictator(that I can remember) has at least a tangible connection to US meddling or the response to US meddling.  From Stalinists and our support of the white army, all the way through the ayatollahss, and our backing up of the Shah.  Meddling hasn't been good.


So, not meddling results in Hitler? How is that better?

Also, standard operating procedure for the American Government is, one, No Communists, recently followed by, two, No Islamists. We don't give a shiat about democracy for anyone else. The only recent president who actually cared about human rights and democracy (not just pretended to care) was Jimmy Carter, and he is routinely mocked for being naive and weak, so there's that.
 
2013-07-08 03:02:10 PM  

DarnoKonrad: Actually Morsi was calling for elections, which were stopped by, guess who, the judiciary. Like I said, you're way too emotional invested in this for some reason to see how military coups are not going to help get rid of a military dictatorship.


Actually, he's been in a power struggle with the judiciary, culminating in Morsi declaring himself above judicial oversight and exempt from all rulings. This is what sparked the protests and calls for ouster.
 
2013-07-08 04:34:54 PM  
For a change, it's nice not to have to pick one of the "both sides are bad."
 
2013-07-08 05:11:23 PM  
I could have sworn he condemned it July 3. Maybe he wasn't "tough" enough.
 
2013-07-08 07:43:09 PM  

theknuckler_33: As Washington fails to condemn the military coup, we ask if it can defend democracy in Egypt.

Why is that our job?


Can you imagine the screeching if we had boots on the ground trying to put Morsi back into power? Exactly who should we be supporting in Egypt right now?
 
2013-07-08 10:26:12 PM  
Careful everyone, Al Jazeera is butthurt right now because the military closed their office in Cairo and shut down their station in Egypt.  Also, some say that their Muslim Brotherhood sympathizers.
 
2013-07-09 03:13:06 AM  
Al-Jazeera is funded by the government of Qatar, which is a major financial backer of the Muslim Brotherhood, FYI.
 
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