If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Global Geopolitics)   Egypt's current ruling army chief, Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi™, was Made in America. Factual bonus: He also watched NFL games   (glblgeopolitics.wordpress.com) divider line 8
    More: Interesting, Made in America, Sissi(TM), U.S. Naval War College, Egypt, NFL, Enduring Freedom, Morsi, constitutional court  
•       •       •

862 clicks; posted to Politics » on 08 Jul 2013 at 9:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-07-08 10:10:27 AM
2 votes:

Philip Francis Queeg: WTF Indeed: Philip Francis Queeg: It's a military coup, not a popular uprising,.

I'm interested, why do you think the military just deposed Morsi?

Because they thought it would best safeguard their own position.

Tell me do you think they did it out of love and concern for the citizens of Egypt? You know the people they have been shooting.


I think internal Egyptian politics are much more complex than the simple caricature of a banana republic that you have reduced them to.
2013-07-08 11:54:39 AM
1 votes:

WTF Indeed: So you read Strauss and Irving Kristol, strong anti-communists/anti-dictatorship thinkers, and thought "Wow, these guys really love dictatorships!"?


I am not sure how you can read Strauss and come away believing he was a fan of the common man and Democracy. I mean... really? Leo Strauss?
2013-07-08 11:32:55 AM
1 votes:

WTF Indeed: BMulligan: You think that is a core tenet of neoconservatism?

Well it's a Straussian argument for neo-conservatism.


I must say, your reading of Strauss and his progeny is very different from mine. I think of neoconservatism as being the intellectual heirs of the same people who brought us Pinochet and the Shah. If democratically elected governments stand in the way of the projection of American power in regions we perceive as strategically important, those governments are expendable.
2013-07-08 10:50:51 AM
1 votes:

cameroncrazy1984: Philip Francis Queeg: So you support the cause of military control of the state. Got it.

Can you please show me where the military is planning on controlling the state? Thanks.


Sure I can. They just removed the elected government.

Let's also look at Egyptian history, shall we?

Leaders of Egypt:

1952- 1970 Col.Nassar.
1970-1981 Lt. Col. Sadat.
1981-2011 Chief Marshal Mubarak
2013-07-08 10:33:25 AM
1 votes:

cameroncrazy1984: DarnoKonrad: And the military in both those cases sided with the civilian government.  The Egyptian military is doing the exact opposite.

I don't see how that's relevant. You're more okay with the military putting down a popular rebellion than supporting one.


You don't see how that's relevant?    You honestly think if George Washington had used his army to dissolve the continental congress we'd be the same nation we are today?  Are you nuts?  Can you not see the precedent this sets?
2013-07-08 10:17:55 AM
1 votes:

Lost Thought 00: Philip Francis Queeg: WTF Indeed: Philip Francis Queeg: It's a military coup, not a popular uprising,.

I'm interested, why do you think the military just deposed Morsi?

Because they thought it would best safeguard their own position.

Tell me do you think they did it out of love and concern for the citizens of Egypt? You know the people they have been shooting.

I think internal Egyptian politics are much more complex than the simple caricature of a banana republic that you have reduced them to.



Exactly, which is why it's important to remember the Egyptian military is not "for the people."   The Egyptian military is its own little centralized state.  They own lots of land, as well as heavy and domestic industry.  If you're employed making refrigerators in Egypt, most likely you're working for the Military.

The coup was about the economy.  Not the people.  It's a safe bet, that at this point, anything that threatens the military's economic base will be removed in the name of the people.  That's what took down Mohamed Morsi.  The economy.

But it's really hard to see how Egypt's economy is going to improve if the military owns everything.
2013-07-08 09:53:27 AM
1 votes:

WTF Indeed: All the senior Egyptian officers are trained at the War College. This is only news to people who have no idea how the world works.


You mean to tell me that we trained the same people who participated in joint operations with US? Next thing you know you will be telling me that we give them aid as well as access to NATO fighters like the F-16 C and D's or the French Mirage fighters in exchange for insurances that the Suez will stay open and to avoid a situation like the Yom Kippur War or the Libyan-Egyptian War.

/But that kinda speak is commie talk and commie talk gets you butt reckt around these parts.
2013-07-08 09:34:13 AM
1 votes:
All the senior Egyptian officers are trained at the War College. This is only news to people who have no idea how the world works.
 
Displayed 8 of 8 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report