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(Science 2.0)   The atomic weights for five elements have been changed; congratulations, magnesium, bromine, germanium, indium, and mercury, you are no longer huge disgusting fatasses   (science20.com) divider line 38
    More: Cool, mercury, atomic weights, classical elements, Pure and Applied Chemistry, milligrams, analytical technique, fluorine, Acura TLs  
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3291 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Jul 2013 at 4:40 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-07 04:55:30 PM
And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.
 
2013-07-07 05:00:39 PM

FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.


justgrits.files.wordpress.com
Much cheaper
 
2013-07-07 05:04:38 PM
Great, after I just memorized them.
 
2013-07-07 05:13:26 PM

FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.


meanwhile every college bookstore and tuition office rejoiced
 
2013-07-07 05:14:28 PM
"A new table in Pure and Applied Chemistry expresses the standard atomic weights of magnesium and bromine as intervals rather than as single standard values."

Apparently Calculus is not required for a journalism degree -- I think they mean INTEGRALS instead of INTERVALS. FAIL!
 
2013-07-07 05:21:39 PM
no, intervals. also, all it says is that Mg is like 24.30X now.
 
2013-07-07 05:23:25 PM

FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.


duckbrand.com
 
2013-07-07 05:33:30 PM
"For example, bromine commonly is considered to have a standard atomic weight of 79.904. However, its actual atomic weight can be anywhere between 79.901 and 79.907"

This is really going to complicate my cheesecake recipe.
 
2013-07-07 05:40:00 PM
Mmmm.... brominated cheesecake... *drool*
 
2013-07-07 05:55:39 PM
Isolating elemental bromine in your garage, Part 1, Part 2.

Enjoy.
=Smidge=
 
2013-07-07 06:00:41 PM
Nice headline. I thought for a moment there was a new element named "Congratulations."
 
2013-07-07 06:01:14 PM

big pig peaches: "For example, bromine commonly is considered to have a standard atomic weight of 79.904. However, its actual atomic weight can be anywhere between 79.901 and 79.907"

This is really going to complicate my cheesecake recipe.


Exactly.  that 0.006 range divided by the "old notion" of 79.904 = .000075, or less than one one hundredth of one percent.
Keep in mind that most "calibrated" scales, pH meters, etc have an acceptable range of error well above that.
This will change nothing.
 
2013-07-07 06:01:48 PM
As a non-scientist person, could someone explain to me how this updating would impact everyday matters?  I understand that such precise measurements would be needed for more rigorous academic work, research, etc.  Would it make a difference in everyday life?
 
2013-07-07 06:14:39 PM

FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.


ya like it matters given all the retards on FB that can't do basic math or spell
 
2013-07-07 06:28:54 PM

FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.


Not every high-school, just those in the blue states, red state schools don't have periodic charts because it's not in the Bible.

/And even if for some bizarre reason the periodic table was in the Bible they wouldn't accept new evidence showing it was originally wrong and had to be updated.
 
2013-07-07 06:31:56 PM

MBA Whore: As a non-scientist person, could someone explain to me how this updating would impact everyday matters?  I understand that such precise measurements would be needed for more rigorous academic work, research, etc.  Would it make a difference in everyday life?


I do rigorous academic work, and this will make no difference to me.  The acceptable deviation in my tools is far greater than the change in the weights here.  Here's an example, I often use magnesium sulfate heptahydrate to make artificial cerebrospinal fluid.  MgSO4.7H2O weighs 246.47g/mol.  Magnesium only weighs about 1/10 of the total.  So an error of one one-hundredth of one percent (as was the case for bromine) will mean my calculations will now be off by one one-hundredth of one percent of one-tenth, which is approximately equal to one unit of jack shiat.
Considering how in my field most people can't even design their drug concentrations to fit evenly in to a semi-log graph, I'm not worried about this at all.

/seriously, what is so damn hard about 1,3,10,30,100,etc?
 
2013-07-07 06:40:00 PM

MBA Whore: As a non-scientist person, could someone explain to me how this updating would impact everyday matters?  I understand that such precise measurements would be needed for more rigorous academic work, research, etc.  Would it make a difference in everyday life?


It's completely insignificant to almost everyone on Earth.

If it mattered to you, you'd have heard about it years ago.
 
2013-07-07 06:44:40 PM
Apparently, page elements are displeased. Site's down.
 
2013-07-07 06:59:25 PM

cashman: "A new table in Pure and Applied Chemistry expresses the standard atomic weights of magnesium and bromine as intervals rather than as single standard values."

Apparently Calculus is not required for a journalism degree -- I think they mean INTEGRALS instead of INTERVALS. FAIL!


Is this the new rotsky?  Integrals wouldn't even make any sense in that sentence.
 
2013-07-07 07:08:50 PM
 
2013-07-07 07:16:53 PM

MBA Whore: As a non-scientist person, could someone explain to me how this updating would impact everyday matters?  I understand that such precise measurements would be needed for more rigorous academic work, research, etc.  Would it make a difference in everyday life?


It doesn't.

No.
 
2013-07-07 07:42:12 PM

FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.


Periodic tables by definition show the properties of the most abundant stable isotope of each element. (Or the most stable isotope if there's no stable isotope)

Nothing changed in the periodic tables.

However, there are other tables that definitely need to be updated.
 
2013-07-07 07:58:51 PM

cashman: "A new table in Pure and Applied Chemistry expresses the standard atomic weights of magnesium and bromine as intervals rather than as single standard values."

Apparently Calculus is not required for a journalism degree -- I think they mean INTEGRALS instead of INTERVALS. FAIL!


I'm with you Abner - can someone fill me in on the missing joke?
 
2013-07-07 08:16:50 PM
www.scienceteecher.com
 
2013-07-07 08:42:21 PM

traylor: FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.

Periodic tables by definition show the properties of the most abundant stable isotope of each element. (Or the most stable isotope if there's no stable isotope)

Nothing changed in the periodic tables.

However, there are other tables that definitely need to be updated.


I thought it was a weighted average. Most tables list carbon as a little over 12, b/c they do account for C14.
 
2013-07-07 09:15:18 PM

Torion!: [www.scienceteecher.com image 225x174]


I always forget this until somebody posts the number...
This is my car.
i1061.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-07 09:16:07 PM
fark me, I just had to memorize this crap last quarter and may have to take chemistry again in a year.

*Throws away notes, periodic tables and books.*
 
2013-07-07 09:59:59 PM

Medic Zero: fark me, I just had to memorize this crap last quarter and may have to take chemistry again in a year.

*Throws away notes, periodic tables and books.*


Teachers who make their students memorize the periodic table are douchnozzles....
 
2013-07-07 10:06:11 PM

Fizpez: Medic Zero: fark me, I just had to memorize this crap last quarter and may have to take chemistry again in a year.

*Throws away notes, periodic tables and books.*

Teachers who make their students memorize the periodic table are douchnozzles....


Neither of my chemistry professors so far have taken that route. I perhaps phrased that poorly, over the course of chemistry last quarter I ended up memorizing part of the table to speed my calculation times by not having to look everything up.
 
2013-07-07 10:17:43 PM
Damnit, now they've gotta update the Breaking Bad logo.
 
2013-07-07 10:46:45 PM

Torion!: [www.scienceteecher.com image 225x174]


The trick to mole is to balance the chocolate to the spices. You don't want one to overwhelm the other.
 
2013-07-07 11:28:44 PM

Tyrone Slothrop: Torion!: [www.scienceteecher.com image 225x174]

The trick to mole is to balance the chocolate to the spices. You don't want one to overwhelm the other.


Whew, almost lost my beer on that one.  gracias por nada, mang.
 
2013-07-07 11:53:45 PM

Trocadero: traylor: FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.

Periodic tables by definition show the properties of the most abundant stable isotope of each element. (Or the most stable isotope if there's no stable isotope)

Nothing changed in the periodic tables.

However, there are other tables that definitely need to be updated.

I thought it was a weighted average. Most tables list carbon as a little over 12, b/c they do account for C14.


Well, fark, you are right. I was reading a page that lied to me when I was posting my previous comment. Looked it up again, turns out the periodic tables show the standard atomic weights, which are the weighted average of the mass of the stable isotopes - except for the elements without stable isotopes where the most stable isotope's weight is showed usually in parenthesis.


*goes to corner*
 
2013-07-08 02:19:43 AM
cdn1.arkive.org
/hot like a blind mole
//checking insurance rates
///online
 
2013-07-08 08:39:20 AM
Who can tell me the atomic weight of bolognium?
 
2013-07-08 09:48:47 AM

Trocadero: traylor: FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.

Periodic tables by definition show the properties of the most abundant stable isotope of each element. (Or the most stable isotope if there's no stable isotope)

Nothing changed in the periodic tables.

However, there are other tables that definitely need to be updated.

I thought it was a weighted average. Most tables list carbon as a little over 12, b/c they do account for C14.


You're right.  It is a weighted average based on the monoisotopic atomic weights and natural abundances.  Atomic weights are taken relative to carbon-12, which, by definition has a mass of exactly 12.000 daltons.  Natural abundance-that is the distribution of isotopes- can vary, making their average atomic weights change.  This will have exactly zero impact for everyone except perhaps some theoretical physicists, and operators of accelerator mass spectrometers.
 
2013-07-08 10:51:05 AM

MBA Whore: As a non-scientist person, could someone explain to me how this updating would impact everyday matters?  I understand that such precise measurements would be needed for more rigorous academic work, research, etc.  Would it make a difference in everyday life?


Try to imagine all life as you know it stopping instantaneously and every molecule in your body exploding at the speed of light.
 
2013-07-08 12:22:12 PM

FormlessOne: And every high school in the country just flipped out, as it's rather expensive to order thousands and thousands of new periodic table charts, textbooks, and so on.


Easy to levy more taxes and make feel people guilty for "not supporting the kids".
 
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