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(Sun News Network)   Emerald Ash Borer could meet his match against Tetrastichus Planipennisi in a battle for forest supremacy on Pay-Per-View. Call your local cable or satellite provider to order   (sunnewsnetwork.ca) divider line 6
    More: Interesting, emerald ash borers, tetrastichus planipennisi, ash borers, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, wasps, United States Department of Agriculture, Latin name, reintroduction  
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1620 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Jul 2013 at 3:53 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-07-07 10:41:32 PM  
1 votes:
SacriliciousBeerSwiller: I'm across the street from miles of state land. Plenty of other ash in the neighborhood with little to no chance of being cut down to keep the little wasps happy.

Wouldn't be the first time my area has done something like this. Several years ago, in an effort to control Eurasian milfoil weeds in our lake, the lake board released thousands of milfoil weevils. They were a supplement to an application of aquatic herbicide. So far, no large scale reapplication of the weed killer has been necessary. So it appears the weevils have done their job.
2013-07-07 10:08:09 PM  
1 votes:

twotowner: As soon as I finished reading the article I was trying to find out if I could buy the wasps and release them in my yard. Sad to say not yet.

Why would I want to save an unremarkable tree? Because replacing four 70+ year old trees with saplings that won't provide decent shade for a good decade or so doesn't sound like like something I want to do.


If you don't have ash borers in your yard, the wasps won't stick around. And if you DO have ash borers in your yard, the responsible thing to do is to have the tree destroyed ASAP.
2013-07-07 07:38:31 PM  
1 votes:
As soon as I finished reading the article I was trying to find out if I could buy the wasps and release them in my yard. Sad to say not yet.

Why would I want to save an unremarkable tree? Because replacing four 70+ year old trees with saplings that won't provide decent shade for a good decade or so doesn't sound like like something I want to do.
2013-07-07 07:12:22 PM  
1 votes:
Why again are we working so hard to save a f*cking unremarkable tree species? Just save some seeds, let the ash borers kill em all and starve to death, then re-plant them. Or just, as I said, f*ck it.
2013-07-07 04:40:28 PM  
1 votes:
Man, I really hope this works. Our street in Michigan used to be lined with ash, creating a beautiful tree tunnel. By the time we moved in, all of the trees were gone and had been replaced with small ornamentals trees. Our new place in Illinois had ash all along the street, too. They were cut down this spring, and you see dead or near dead ash all over the city. On the plus side, you're getting more biodiversity by replacing the lost ash with a wide variety of species, but I still miss the old streetscapes.

/C'mon wasps, kick these ash holes out of town!
2013-07-07 03:36:39 PM  
1 votes:
SUNDAY!
SUNDAY!
SUNDAY!
 
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