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(NYPost)   Oldest refrigerator in the United States is still running perfectly after 85 years. Yeah - it's pretty cool   (nypost.com) divider line 68
    More: Cool, United States, refrigerators  
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5948 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Jul 2013 at 10:05 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-07 09:17:51 AM
I'll bet it can withstand a nuclear blast.
 
2013-07-07 10:11:49 AM
The year it was first purchased was between 1929 and 1931. General Electric seized production of the monitor top design in 1937 to focus on flat tops.
 
2013-07-07 10:14:37 AM

Demetrius: I'll bet it can withstand a nuclear blast.


Sure, but could its contents?
 
2013-07-07 10:17:54 AM
I thought that was Letterman for an instant when I saw the picture...
 
2013-07-07 10:19:20 AM
And the one you buy today will self destruct 3 days after the warranty is over
 
2013-07-07 10:22:02 AM
Pay the owner 100x it's comparable market value so we don't make THAT mistake again.
 
2013-07-07 10:28:07 AM
The range in my apartment is a vintage 50's piece. Other than the fact that the back of the oven gets hotter than the front, it works great. It's not REALLY that hard to turn something halfway through.
 
2013-07-07 10:29:38 AM
I thought my parent's McClary from the '50s was old.

i.ebayimg.com

Dr.Zom: The year it was first purchased was between 1929 and 1931. General Electric seized production of the monitor top design in 1937 to focus on flat tops.


Could have been worse; they could have said "shuttered".
 
2013-07-07 10:32:23 AM
Awesome! A FARK refrigerator thread! I love these!

CSB: I once owned a refrigerator. I would put food inside it. The inside was all cold and stuff. Every time I would open the refrigerator door, the light would be on. I asked my friend if the light really went out when the door was closed. He told me to get inside, close the door, and find out for myself. My friend later turned out to be Jay Leno. I then went to school and asked the teacher why the word "fridge" was short for "refrigerator." Shouldn't it be "frige?" There's no "d" in "refrigerator", and I don't see the point in failing me and kicking me out of Yale for spelling refrigerator "refrigderator" because clearly there's some sort of conspiracy to confuse people about the spelling of this word. My teacher later turned out to be former football player William Perry.

So, in closing, I encourage any of our farkers with young children to take them out to the closest town dump, find an old refrigerator, climb inside, close the door firmly, and reenact your favorite scene from Steven Spielberg's greatest film, "The Terminal."
 
2013-07-07 10:33:51 AM
The Swan house in Atlanta has one of a that they claim still works
 
2013-07-07 10:34:05 AM

Dr.Zom: The year it was first purchased was between 1929 and 1931. General Electric seized production of the monitor top design in 1937 to focus on flat tops.


Today I'm copy-editing. It's a dying trade, nearly deceased.
 
2013-07-07 10:35:15 AM
Its basketball-like top houses the mechanical assembly which is still cooling food as though it was bought yesterday.

images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-07-07 10:39:43 AM
Someone screwed up - what is the point of planned obsolescence if you make products that last?
 
2013-07-07 10:41:19 AM

thatguyoverthere70: Awesome! A FARK refrigerator thread! I love these!

CSB: I once owned a refrigerator. I would put food inside it. The inside was all cold and stuff. Every time I would open the refrigerator door, the light would be on. I asked my friend if the light really went out when the door was closed. He told me to get inside, close the door, and find out for myself. My friend later turned out to be Jay Leno. I then went to school and asked the teacher why the word "fridge" was short for "refrigerator." Shouldn't it be "frige?" There's no "d" in "refrigerator", and I don't see the point in failing me and kicking me out of Yale for spelling refrigerator "refrigderator" because clearly there's some sort of conspiracy to confuse people about the spelling of this word. My teacher later turned out to be former football player William Perry.

So, in closing, I encourage any of our farkers with young children to take them out to the closest town dump, find an old refrigerator, climb inside, close the door firmly, and reenact your favorite scene from Steven Spielberg's greatest film, "The Terminal."


You were sooo close to "witty", too. Damned shame, that.
 
2013-07-07 10:42:25 AM
Refrigeration: one of the major technical innovations that completely changed the world.
 
2013-07-07 10:42:37 AM

cardex: And the one you buy today will self destruct 3 days after the warranty is over


manufacturers smartened up in the 80's
 
2013-07-07 10:44:12 AM
This refrigerator is doomed if its owner cares about their power bill and puts two and two together.
 
2013-07-07 10:48:04 AM
"Is your refridgerator running?" *muted snickering*

"Yep, old girl is still running strong after 85 years of continuous use."

"..."
 
2013-07-07 10:48:13 AM
It's so cute! I can't believe how much it cost when it came out. It's amazing that American companies were willing to roll out such expensive appliances during the Great Depression. I honestly can't imagine what planning meals was like before refrigeration. I guess people relied a lot more on canning? Our fridge is nothing fancy but I can keep lettuce for a week or more. That's pretty cool.

^See what I did there?
 
2013-07-07 10:49:00 AM

theorellior: Refrigeration: one of the major technical innovations that completely changed the world.


I'm not sure that +1 movement to naval units is that much of a game-changer, but it was a nice bonus.  Plus you can then found the cereal corp but without a lot of counter to pollution using those things just made their city's growth annoying hard to manage.
 
2013-07-07 10:59:13 AM
Quantum Apostrophe:
Dr.Zom: The year it was first purchased was between 1929 and 1931. General Electric seized production of the monitor top design in 1937 to focus on flat tops.

Could have been worse; they could have said "shutteredshuddered".


Fixed that for my own entertainment.

All your monitor top design belong to us.
 
2013-07-07 10:59:18 AM

Dr.Zom: The year it was first purchased was between 1929 and 1931. General Electric seized production of the monitor top design in 1937 to focus on flat tops.


Thank you. I came here to point out this mistake. I've decided to only attack poor grammar in professional writing. This dimwit got paid for this glaring error. I also assume that editors and proofreaders no longer exist.
 
2013-07-07 11:03:12 AM

SpikeStrip: cardex: And the one you buy today will self destruct 3 days after the warranty is over

manufacturers smartened up in the 80's




As recently as six years ago, refrigerators had a one year full coverage warranty, and five years on the compressor/sealed system. Now, the standard warranty on everything is one year. So if your compressor fails at thirteen months old, you're looking at a repair bill that will likely be half of the purchase price of a new unit. And the reason they've shortened the warranties is because of the failure rate of the compressors that they use now.

But us consumers are at least partly responsible for this. The inflation adjusted price for the refrigerator is $4,225. There is no way someone could make a refrigerator in anyway similar to that and make a profit today. Combine that with the engineering compromises caused by meeting the Energy Star requirements, and you end up with today's flashy junk.
 
2013-07-07 11:07:54 AM

theorellior: Refrigeration: one of the major technical innovations that completely changed the world.


Impossible. It was invented before we went into space.
 
2013-07-07 11:35:41 AM
 
2013-07-07 11:36:20 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: I thought my parent's McClary from the '50s was old.

[i.ebayimg.com image 168x300]

Dr.Zom: The year it was first purchased was between 1929 and 1931. General Electric seized production of the monitor top design in 1937 to focus on flat tops.

Could have been worse; they could have said "shuttered".




Packed them on a train?
 
2013-07-07 11:52:14 AM
Interesting article. A refrigerator that's been running for 85 years. It got me to wondering. Is Prince Albert still in the can?
 
2013-07-07 11:57:53 AM

Artcurus: Mehh, 1940's Frigidaire from my Great Grandmother's house still going strong.

http://www.theantiqueplace.ca/antiques-for-sale/kitchen/vintage-anti qu e-frigidaire-refrigerator-made-by-general-motors_30


A refrigerator in Canada? Isn't that redundant? You could just store food outside for 11 months and unplug the refrigerator.
 
2013-07-07 12:05:53 PM

Dracolich: This refrigerator is doomed if its owner cares about their power bill and puts two and two together.


Exactly.  Right now the corporate board of the power company is voting to authorize paying any price for this refrigerator to avoid the cost of having to deploy another generating facility.
 
2013-07-07 12:23:50 PM
85 years? Just a child...

www.centennialbulb.org
 
2013-07-07 12:35:39 PM
Just wait'll it finally springs a leak (and it will). There's enough toxic Sulfur dioxide gas in that thing to turn the neighborhood into a Superfund site.
 
2013-07-07 12:36:28 PM

ginandbacon: It's so cute! I can't believe how much it cost when it came out. It's amazing that American companies were willing to roll out such expensive appliances during the Great Depression. I honestly can't imagine what planning meals was like before refrigeration. I guess people relied a lot more on canning? Our fridge is nothing fancy but I can keep lettuce for a week or more. That's pretty cool.

^See what I did there?


Well, there used to be a whole industry built around manufacturing and delivering ice to homes for literal iceboxes.  Before then, there was canning of course, but the majority of the population were farmers so they had fresh food every day.  Wasn't until the majority of people were living in cities or suburbs (or at least enough people, happened around 1900-1930 in the US)  that it became a real hot issue because you have to have enough food to go around and you can't really rely on outlying farms for it, and you have to bring in perishable goods from farther and farther away the more people you have to support.
 
2013-07-07 12:41:04 PM
Meanwhile your Xbox 360 is on its third RROD
 
2013-07-07 01:16:57 PM

alltim: Dr.Zom: The year it was first purchased was between 1929 and 1931. General Electric seized production of the monitor top design in 1937 to focus on flat tops.

Thank you. I came here to point out this mistake. I've decided to only attack poor grammar in professional writing. This dimwit got paid for this glaring error. I also assume that editors and proofreaders no longer exist.


Many publishers see them as a cost to be cut, adding no real value to the end product. Relying on spellchecking software doesn't always work.
 
2013-07-07 01:29:54 PM
Bought a new house 9 years ago, with appliances. So far, replaced central air unit, well pump, fridge, and dishwasher.
 
2013-07-07 01:30:27 PM

Repo Man: Combine that with the engineering compromises caused by meeting the Energy Star requirements, and you end up with today's flashy junk.


Bullshiat. Poorly-designed compressors use more energy, not less. Poorly-designed refrigerators leak more, not less. The crappiness of today's refrigerators is basically nothing more than short-sighted planned obsolescence.

Quantum Apostrophe: Impossible. It was invented before we went into space.


Meh. Usually I'll play along, just not in the mood today.
 
2013-07-07 01:42:18 PM
I unplugged the Coldspot freezer in my grandparents' house in 2011.  It was plugged in when they built the house in '61 so that's 50 years of continuous use.  Also disconnected the phone which had been active since the same time.  A couple of the phones still had the x-xxxx number written on the rotary dial and labels with emergency numbers predating the 911 system.
 
2013-07-07 02:14:56 PM
i.huffpost.com

What an 85 year old refrigerator may look like.
 
2013-07-07 02:15:11 PM

theorellior: Bullshiat. Poorly-designed compressors use more energy, not less. Poorly-designed refrigerators leak more, not less. The crappiness of today's refrigerators is basically nothing more than short-sighted planned obsolescence.


Sure, but building new fridges and shipping them from China surely outweighs the benefit. Electricity is cheap enough, especially when Solaren will beam it down for free from space in 2016.

theorellior: Meh. Usually I'll play along, just not in the mood today.


Or you have nothing to say. Your religion is getting more ridiculous every day.
 
2013-07-07 02:25:56 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: theorellior: Meh. Usually I'll play along, just not in the mood today.

Or you have nothing to say. Your religion is getting more ridiculous every day.


The more you beat this dead horse the more ridiculous you look. Or are you not aware that modern refrigeration literally made space flight possible? See "liquid oxygen"...
 
2013-07-07 02:30:06 PM

Stone Meadow: modern refrigeration literally made space flight possible


Who said otherwise???

It's the space nuts that usually say "we only have technology X because of space!"

Space is an apex technology, it only exists once the technology is there, not before.

Seriously, you don't get that I'm saying that?

Really?

How much more clear do you want me to be?
 
2013-07-07 02:44:13 PM
I would drill two holes in the face of it.  I bet that sucker could hold two corny kegs.  Just like I did the old pull handle Freezepoint which died a few years ago.  I miss that old keggerator.
 
2013-07-07 02:45:54 PM

theorellior: Repo Man: Combine that with the engineering compromises caused by meeting the Energy Star requirements, and you end up with today's flashy junk.

Bullshiat. Poorly-designed compressors use more energy, not less. Poorly-designed refrigerators leak more, not less. The crappiness of today's refrigerators is basically nothing more than short-sighted planned obsolescence.

Quantum Apostrophe: Impossible. It was invented before we went into space.

Meh. Usually I'll play along, just not in the mood today.




Using a computer board to dynamically determine how often a refrigerator goes into the defrost mode can save energy when compared to a standard defrost timer that puts it into a defrost mode once a day whether it needs it or not. Unfortunately, compared to a simple mechanical defrost timer, computer boards are very fragile, and much more expensive to replace when they do fail. A voltage spike from a tree limb taking out a power line in your neighborhood can easily take out a computer board, while the defrost timer would remain unaffected. DC refrigerator compressors save energy when compared to AC compressors. While the compressors themselves seem to last just as long, DC compressors require a very expensive inverter board that's prone to failure. Over and over, when faced with keeping costs low so they will sell, meeting the demands of energy efficiency, and the realities of globalization, the result is fragile junk. Energy Star may still be worth doing, but I find myself wondering if the complete costs of the increased turnover of appliances have been taken into account. It's undeniably one of the reasons that modern appliances are more fragile, and are replaced more often. Have the costs of the manufacture and transportation of new appliances, plus the disposal of the old ones, been fully accounted for? I hope so.

And once again, on consumer choice; some makes and models of refrigerators are still available with five year sealed system warranties. Yes, you have to pay more, but it's a wise investment. They ought to be the top selling brands/models, but they are not.

I have a Quasar microwave built in April of 1985. I use it every day, and it works perfectly. Just a few years ago, all of the top brand companies offered microwave ovens that had a one year full coverage warranty, and a five, seven, and in a few cases ten year warranties on the magnetron, which is the part that actually generates the microwaves. Now, they have all gone to a one year warranty. If the magnetron fails, you junk the oven and buy a new one. Even if it's an expensive microhood model. I'd be curious to know what the price of my twenty eight year old Quasar would be in inflation adjusted dollars. My hunch is that it would cost twice to three times as much as a comparable modern one. Would people be willing to pay that much for a microwave oven that can last at least twenty eight years, versus the ones you get now for much less, that will last five years at best?
 
2013-07-07 02:53:13 PM

Repo Man: And once again, on consumer choice; some makes and models of refrigerators are still available with five year sealed system warranties. Yes, you have to pay more, but it's a wise investment. They ought to be the top selling brands/models, but they are not.


That's because consumers have been trained over the last 20 years that it's better to buy cheap Chinese crap and replace it later than to buy quality, Chinese or not, and never replace it.
 
2013-07-07 03:31:12 PM

TV's Vinnie: Just wait'll it finally springs a leak (and it will). There's enough toxic Sulfur dioxide gas in that thing to turn the neighborhood into a Superfund site.


I was wondering if it was sulfur dioxide or ammonia... certainly before freon. Are you guessing or do you know that it was SO2?
 
2013-07-07 03:47:36 PM
My olive green beer fridge in the garage was manufactured in 1965. Runs like a champ.
 
2013-07-07 03:55:01 PM

majestic: My olive green beer fridge in the garage was manufactured in 1965. Runs like a champ.


See, now that's the kind of beer fridge I need - something that's about 50 years old and looks like it'd be full of Ballantine.
 
2013-07-07 04:03:02 PM

Gulper Eel: majestic: My olive green beer fridge in the garage was manufactured in 1965. Runs like a champ.

See, now that's the kind of beer fridge I need - something that's about 50 years old and looks like it'd be full of Ballantine.


My father had something like that in the garage. Even had the old cloth wires still attached and in good shape.

//Was in good shape, until it burnt his house down...
 
2013-07-07 04:05:19 PM

AndreMA: TV's Vinnie: Just wait'll it finally springs a leak (and it will). There's enough toxic Sulfur dioxide gas in that thing to turn the neighborhood into a Superfund site.

I was wondering if it was sulfur dioxide or ammonia... certainly before freon. Are you guessing or do you know that it was SO2?




The article says it was purchased between 1929 to 1931; that means it's most likely using R-12.

Refrigerators from the late 1800s until 1929 used the toxic gases, ammonia (NH3), methyl chloride (CH3Cl), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as refrigerants. Several fatal accidents occurred in the 1920s because of methyl chloride leakage from refrigerators. People started leaving their refrigerators in their backyards. A collaborative effort began between three American corporations, Frigidaire, General Motors and DuPont to search for a less dangerous method of refrigeration.

In 1928, Thomas Midgley, Jr. aided by Charles Franklin Kettering invented a "miracle compound" called Freon. Freon represents several different chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, which are used in commerce and industry. The CFCs are a group of aliphatic organic compounds containing the elements carbon and fluorine, and, in many cases, other halogens (especially chlorine) and hydrogen. Freons are colorless, odorless, nonflammable, noncorrosive gases or liquids...

...Thomas Midgley was chosen by Charles Franklin Kettering to head the research into the new refrigerants. Frigidaire was issued the first patent, US#1,886,339, for the formula for CFCs on December 31, 1928.

Freon
 
2013-07-07 04:11:13 PM

Repo Man: Several fatal accidents occurred in the 1920s because of methyl chloride leakage from refrigerators. People started leaving their refrigerators in their backyards.


Ahhh, that explains the "porch refrigerator" concept.
 
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