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(Gizmodo)   Where exactly Is the middle of nowhere? Maine and Idaho, apparently   (gizmodo.com) divider line 30
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3653 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Jul 2013 at 8:50 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-06 09:04:15 AM

Think it would be better to map by population density. This link is really just. Map of accessibility.


There are a lot of areas of "nowhere" with major Interstates running through them. Doesn't mean there's anything or anyone there.

 
2013-07-06 09:19:15 AM

Doc Daneeka: Think it would be better to map by population density. This link is really just. Map of accessibility.
There are a lot of areas of "nowhere" with major Interstates running through them. Doesn't mean there's anything or anyone there.


Maine and Idaho are still right up there, though you'd have to throw in Nevada and most of the upper midwest
education.randmcnally.com
 
2013-07-06 09:25:08 AM
Utah/Arizona border, here. The one direct route south, (US 89), collapsed and added forty miles of two lane road to the trip to Flagstaff. Yep, middle of nowhere.

/suits me fine
 
2013-07-06 09:30:40 AM
Having lived in Idaho, I can testify that yes, you can definitely end up in the middle of nowhere there.

However, there are places in Oregon and Nevada I would put on the list as well.
 
2013-07-06 09:41:05 AM
Some regions are "the middle of nowhere" by geology - but most are that way by law.  In the West, those two often coincide.

www.freedom21.org

/hot
 
2013-07-06 09:50:24 AM
No, internationally, the real nowhere is a spot called the "Zone of Inaccessibility" at 47°9′S 126°43′W--until the stars are right...then you will "...See an ancient sunken city where the angles are wrong/ You'll see the Fourth Dimension if you're there very long/ Welcome to the conventicle/ Bring along your pentacle/ Else you'll be dragged off by a tentacle..." (Credit, Joan Carruth and Larry Press, (c) 1978)
 
2013-07-06 09:52:56 AM
 
2013-07-06 09:54:46 AM

BizarreMan: Having lived in Idaho, I can testify that yes, you can definitely end up in the middle of nowhere there.

However, there are places in Oregon and Nevada I would put on the list as well.


Wagontire, OR comes to mind. Population 3.
 
2013-07-06 10:02:27 AM
I live in Maine, so I'm really getting a kick out of some of these replies.

And we're the EDGE of nowhere, not the middle of it.  Well, we're kind of off-center, anyway...
 
2013-07-06 10:09:28 AM

xanadian: I live in Maine, so I'm really getting a kick out of some of these replies.

And we're the EDGE of nowhere, not the middle of it.  Well, we're kind of off-center, anyway...


You are of course right. I grew up in Northern Maine, it is not the middle of nowhere, but you can see it from there.
 
2013-07-06 10:28:09 AM

a_bilge_monkey: Utah/Arizona border, here. The one direct route south, (US 89), collapsed and added forty miles of two lane road to the trip to Flagstaff. Yep, middle of nowhere.

/suits me fine


Was in your neck of the woods desert last month.  Gorgeous country.  Wanted to go up to Horseshoe Canyon, but the road was closed.  Maybe next trip West.
 
2013-07-06 11:04:57 AM

a_bilge_monkey: Utah/Arizona border, here. The one direct route south, (US 89), collapsed and added forty miles of two lane road to the trip to Flagstaff. Yep, middle of nowhere.

/suits me fine


I'd say that a place where the road can just collapse and be left that way qualifies. Damn.
 
2013-07-06 11:20:48 AM
The map only lists the lower 48.  Most of Alaska qualifies as nowhere.
 
2013-07-06 11:35:25 AM
The correct answer is Perth, Australia.
 
2013-07-06 11:38:48 AM
The GIS measures the Euclidean distance within the map projection from every cell

Cool.  Now give me the non-Euclidean map,
 
2013-07-06 11:42:11 AM
I thought Cherry county in Nebraska had the lowest population density in the lower 48?
 
2013-07-06 11:47:38 AM

MFAWG: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5P6zdlPJ34


I see your appropriate music link and raise you this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWtCittJyr0&sns=em

Bonus: this link works for mobile users ;)
 
2013-07-06 12:05:44 PM

xanadian: I live in Maine, so I'm really getting a kick out of some of these replies.

And we're the EDGE of nowhere, not the middle of it.  Well, we're kind of off-center, anyway...


Perfect location for my institute - The Off-Center for the Study of Eccentricity
 
2013-07-06 12:16:56 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-07-06 12:20:08 PM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: The correct answer is Perth, Australia.


It's the most isolated major city in the world, but by the criteria within TFA it's not the "middle of nowhere." Any city/town/village wouldn't either.
 
2013-07-06 01:26:31 PM
I can confirm this. I'm driving through the intersection of Nevada, Idaho, and Oregon now./almost to Wells, NV//a more accurate map would include cell phone service
 
2013-07-06 01:44:06 PM

Creoena: Doc Daneeka: Think it would be better to map by population density. This link is really just. Map of accessibility.
There are a lot of areas of "nowhere" with major Interstates running through them. Doesn't mean there's anything or anyone there.

Maine and Idaho are still right up there, though you'd have to throw in Nevada and most of the upper midwest
[education.randmcnally.com image 850x596]


Headed upstate (Northern Maine) a week from tomorrow to visit my FIL. Never been north of Caribou. Should be fun other than the fact he doesn't drink but (fingers crossed) I don't think he'll mind if I do.

//Christ i hope not.
 
2013-07-06 02:13:42 PM

Schlong Uzi: I can confirm this. I'm driving through the intersection of Nevada, Idaho, and Oregon now./almost to Wells, NV//a more accurate map would include cell phone service


In Wells make sure you stop by the local brothel.
 
2013-07-06 02:40:35 PM
I pick a spot on Google maps, then zoom all the way in.  If you can't get a street view, start zooming out.  The farther you have to zoom out in order to get a street view, the more 'middle of nowhere' that place is.
 
2013-07-06 03:00:53 PM

Smeggy Smurf: The map only lists the lower 48.  Most of Alaska qualifies as nowhere.



This
When it comes to remoteness, AK trumps all of the lower 48. The whole state would be red if shown on that first map.  I've been to villages that don't have roads. Not just off the road network, but no roads in town - just a 4 ft wide boardwalk between buildings. The office I work in has 3 classifications of 'rural' (Rural on road network, rural with a puddle-jumper hub, and rural bush - no roads and end of the line for puddle jumpers), with most places considered rural in the lower 48classifying as urban here. Probably the only place in the US where you can have to haul your water and use an outhouse and still be considered urban (Goldstream valley area).
 
2013-07-06 05:45:55 PM
According to this, it's in Yellowstone, using a similar calculation.
 
2013-07-06 05:58:35 PM

Paris1127: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: The correct answer is Perth, Australia.

It's the most isolated major city in the world, but by the criteria within TFA it's not the "middle of nowhere." Any city/town/village wouldn't either.


The correct answer is still Perth, Australia.
 
2013-07-06 07:57:45 PM

Doc Daneeka: Think it would be better to map by population density. This link is really just. Map of accessibility.
There are a lot of areas of "nowhere" with major Interstates running through them. Doesn't mean there's anything or anyone there.


Ahem.
As someone FROM Aroostook County, northern Maine- those graphics are correct for that region. Truckers get list in the Allagash because of old mapped and incorrect roads. You can go and get lost REAL easy in the Allagash Wilderness, bub....
 
2013-07-06 10:31:40 PM
i.imgur.com

Took this on Lady Elliot Island, which is an island at the southern tip of the Great Barrier Reef. It felt like I was nowhere.
 
2013-07-07 05:29:26 PM
Canada scoffs at your ideas of emptiness and inaccessibility.

In the 1960s, Canadian geographers invented the concept of "Nordicity" or "Northerness" for a variety of official purposes. It was partly physical, psychological and cultural--North as defined by the compass, the economy and the imagination. Government employees got isolation pay based on the Nordicity of their location. The cost of living is much higher in the North if you don't live off the land but instead wait for the airplane to arrive each month.

Middle of nowhere, shown in mauve:

www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/articles/nordicity

Basically the North West, plus Alaska, is the United States's Inner Canada, while Canada proper is Outer Canada. Inner Canada is more right wing than the rest of the USA, while Outer Canada is more left wing han the core of the Eastern USA or California. The yellow area is not unlike the States which it borders, but even Alberta is more social democratic than say, Montana or Idaho.

The population in the mauve area is still more than 50% native for the most part, but there are pockets connected by air, by ice road, or by pavement or rail where you can even find New Canadians, such as Portuguese or Muslim immigrants.

This is the last frontier. It is roughly the size of the inhabitable part of the USA, and with climate change, it is opening up to development and even, in the pale mauve region, agriculture.

I would say that the real middle of nowhere for North America as a whole is Alert, Ellesmere Island, Canada. Let's hope it lives up to its name, because the North is fragile and valuable and Winter is Coming. In fact, I expect the next Cold War, which has already started, to be fought there.
 
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