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(Wacky Owl)   Sixteen years. This is what sixteen years of obsession looks like   (wackyowl.com) divider line 97
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31262 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jul 2013 at 11:33 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-06 12:36:15 AM
Here are some photos of a spectacular and incredibly detailed model railroad installation. But let's ignore them while we present this high school report on this hobby which is enjoyed by many people across the world in many countries. Some of them use 3D modeling software which we are not going to show you. In conclusion, some people have model trains big enough to ride. Thank you.

/That article was bad and the scribbler should feel bad
 
2013-07-06 12:37:36 AM
Find a show on PBS called Tracks Ahead, they go all around the world showing off everything from full size working railroads to garden trains and all types of model layouts, made by the Milwaukee PBS station!

Garden railroads go from to small to ride up to fancy ride on trains that people spend fortunes on!
 
2013-07-06 12:38:56 AM

Repo Man: Now here's a case of an amazing obsession with a tragic ending: RC B-52 crash.

The time and money that went into that, only to be turned into a patch of smoking junk.


Oh damn, and I really liked 'Shiny Happy People.'
 
2013-07-06 12:42:21 AM
Lisa Sparxxx had a bigger train.
 
2013-07-06 12:42:37 AM
I have to say I am very impressed. i wonder if he built it all himself of if he had the help.
 
2013-07-06 12:42:42 AM
Wow! That was impressive!!

tallguywithglasseson: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2354421/Worlds-largest-model- r ailroad-draws-thousands-NJ.html
http://www.nj.com/hunterdon-county-democrat/index.ssf/2013/03/northl an dz_is_the_ho-scale_wor.html

Article was somewhat lacking in actual article-ness. Above links have a bit more info.


Loved the video in the toplink. This guy not only has a world record train set, he has a world class organ!
 
2013-07-06 12:44:56 AM

just_another_asshole/jaa: Find a show on PBS called Tracks Ahead, they go all around the world showing off everything from full size working railroads to garden trains and all types of model layouts, made by the Milwaukee PBS station!

Garden railroads go from to small to ride up to fancy ride on trains that people spend fortunes on!


Walt Disney loved his model trains so much he built Disneyland so he could have a bigger train set.

or so I have read.
 
2013-07-06 12:45:21 AM
Well, it certainly is a better use of time than being a serial torturer-killer.
 
2013-07-06 12:52:23 AM
When I was a kid I used to love going to Mike's Trainland, in Suffolk, VA.
 
2013-07-06 12:54:05 AM
A friend told me of childhood memories with the HO scale set up his Dad bought him. He was never allowed to touch a damn thing, his Dad would set it up and play with it a few times a year. Holy crap, you wouldn't believe the money some of the cars (with their original cartons) brought in when I sold them on eBay for him. +1 for Moms who clean out attics.
 
2013-07-06 01:01:37 AM
img824.imageshack.us
 
2013-07-06 01:03:38 AM
Oh yeah, those of you using the latest computing technology to make fun of model-train geeks may not appreciate that a good bit of the early history of computing revolved around the Tech Model Railroad Club at MIT.  A lot of the early hackers who laid the foundations of nearly everything that came after, got their first taste of real computing working on the information processing needs of that layout.
 
2013-07-06 01:06:23 AM
Meh - that's sort of cool I guess.  Not the best model railroad I've seen.  It's all in attention to detail.  Show me a railroad station built with 7,000 tiny pieces of wood and I'll be impressed.  A gigantic badly made plaster mountain?  Not so much.

I grew up with a father who was a model railroader.  Every summer we went to NMRA conventions.  We visited a lot of homes with model railroads.  I even built a few models for the layout, but my favorite thing was crashing the trains.  I had a model of a diesel switch engine which was sort of an anachronism for my father's train layout that could go about a zillion miles an hour that I would run around the track until it flew off.

Model railroaders are the ultimate geeks - not that there's anything wrong with being a geek.
 
2013-07-06 01:08:35 AM
Well, that trumps the shiat out of anything Sandusky had.
 
2013-07-06 01:21:59 AM
No monorails?

No maglev?

Sorry, dude:

img69.imageshack.us
 
2013-07-06 01:22:41 AM

Kensey: Oh yeah, those of you using the latest computing technology to make fun of model-train geeks may not appreciate that a good bit of the early history of computing revolved around the Tech Model Railroad Club at MIT.  A lot of the early hackers who laid the foundations of nearly everything that came after, got their first taste of real computing working on the information processing needs of that layout.


CSB:

One of my projects my senior year in college involved a model train.   We had a couple of sensors and 2 trains on circular tracks that intersected.  We had to write code (mostly in assembly language) that would control them so they didn't crash.

I don't even remember how I did that, but I passed the class.  I probably have print outs of the source code in a box somewhere in my basement.
 
2013-07-06 01:24:49 AM

KrispyKritter: A friend told me of childhood memories with the HO scale set up his Dad bought him. He was never allowed to touch a damn thing, his Dad would set it up and play with it a few times a year. Holy crap, you wouldn't believe the money some of the cars (with their original cartons) brought in when I sold them on eBay for him. +1 for Moms who clean out attics.


A buddy of mine asked me several years ago if I'd be interested in selling his Matchbox collection (mostly from the 60's) on eBay, since I was a "platinum triple star gold medal powerseller" at the time (that was before eBay got way weird).
Hesitated for a bit because it would turn into a lot of work for pictures, descriptions, ratings etc for every single item (I was used to moving a ton of the same type of merchandise). Dang! People went crazy on those auctions. Interesting how much money is out there to be spent on hobbies and collections.
 
2013-07-06 01:36:35 AM
gfid:  I even built a few models for the layout, but my favorite thing was crashing the trains.  I had a model of a diesel switch engine which was sort of an anachronism for my father's train layout that could go about a zillion miles an hour that I would run around the track until it flew off.


Was that the engine with the rubber bands that went directly from the motor to the axles of the wheels?  Yeah, it had a top speed of 400 or 500 smph, iirc.
 
2013-07-06 01:42:05 AM

CruJones: I have a Lionel train I break out for Christmas.  It's fun for ten minutes.  What do you do after you've completed this monstrosity, just watch the train go around for the next fifteen years?   Seems like the building is the fun part.  Or something, fun may not be the right word.


24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-06 01:55:47 AM
There was a hobby shop around here that started getting into this. They had old guys out on the floor working on landscapes and I was there once or twice where they were getting snippy with customers. And then they went out of business.
 
2013-07-06 02:00:10 AM
I hate to go all studman69 on a model railroad, but that one has too much vertical distance compared to horizontal distance.  And some of the bridges are just huge monstrosities to show off a high bridge.

This is one of my favorites of all time.
http://www.horailroad.com/fsm/fsmlayout0.html

And the Gorre and Daphetid was a wonder back in the day.  Too bad it burned in the early 70s just a few days after its builder died.

http://gdlines.com/GD_Galleries/Planning/slides/3nightlights-orig.ht ml
 
2013-07-06 02:02:56 AM

SirEattonHogg: I'm glad I read that article.  There is actually a hobby out there where people actually try to reproduce a railway at a smaller scale?  With minature people, buildings and cars?

What a strange, strange world.


What are you talking about? Those are all full size. He's just really big.
 
2013-07-06 02:09:04 AM
 
2013-07-06 02:09:33 AM

CruJones: I have a Lionel train I break out for Christmas.  It's fun for ten minutes.  What do you do after you've completed this monstrosity, just watch the train go around for the next fifteen years?   Seems like the building is the fun part.  Or something, fun may not be the right word.


The building part is most of the fun.  But some builders design their layout to be operated like a real railroad.  Cars are picked up from various industries and dropped off at various others.  Hidden trackage is used to simulate an "off layout" destination or originating train.  So a train may appear around a bend, travel through the layout picking up and dropping off cars at various industries, and then proceed off the other end of the layout and disappear.  Plus, if you have multiple trains, you have the challenge of avoiding collisions, not blocking an "express" with a "local", etc.  It's kind of like a game of tetris - you have to be watching what the next piece is going to be so you can fit it in with all the others, or you get a traffic jam.

In addition, because the scale distances are obviously shorter, some people use a scale time clock - which runs at some multiple of real time.  So you could run a 24 hour day in a 3-hour operating session with an 8:1 fast clock.  Some people even set up the lighting to simulate sunset and sunrise, building lighting to turn on and off at the appropriate times, etc.
 
2013-07-06 02:11:25 AM
CSB Time:

I grew up w/ model trains.  I inherited the bug  from my grandfather.  As an adult I lost interest but I found myself with A LOT of train stuff, both HO-scale (the size you usually see in toy stores) and N-scale (little tiny ones).  The whole collection was into the thousands. I had packed them up as a teen and only took them out when the kids wanted to use them.  I would just set the tracks up on a table for them.   Anyhow, I had all of it packed away in boxes when I was moving back around 2006 or so.  I asked a friend to take some junk to the dumpster and he obliged.  In hindsight I left the train boxes too close to the junk boxes.  I didn't figure out what happened until several months later when my daughter asked to play with the trains and I could not find them after tearing the place apart looking.  I am now two moves later and I still kick myself for the mix-up, but only because they got thrown away and potentially never got used again.

To this day I hope some kid found the boxes by the dumpster and took them home to play with the trains, but I doubt it.  I guess the good part of the story is that I realized then that toys are for playing with, not collecting.  I don't really care about their value so much and I'm too busy (and old) to use them, so I have been giving away the old toys I have to friends' kids who like them ever since (I have a ton of old toys).

/end CSB
 
2013-07-06 02:11:52 AM

Momzilla59: just_another_asshole/jaa: Find a show on PBS called Tracks Ahead, they go all around the world showing off everything from full size working railroads to garden trains and all types of model layouts, made by the Milwaukee PBS station!

Garden railroads go from to small to ride up to fancy ride on trains that people spend fortunes on!

Walt Disney loved his model trains so much he built Disneyland so he could have a bigger train set.

or so I have read.


I would not be surprized to find out he had his own train, at least a few private cars.
 
2013-07-06 02:16:40 AM
Like a doll house, only a grown man did it.  Creepy.
 
2013-07-06 02:21:11 AM

rej1138: I hate to go all studman69 on a model railroad, but that one has too much vertical distance compared to horizontal distance.  And some of the bridges are just huge monstrosities to show off a high bridge.

This is one of my favorites of all time.
http://www.horailroad.com/fsm/fsmlayout0.html

And the Gorre and Daphetid was a wonder back in the day.  Too bad it burned in the early 70s just a few days after its builder died.

http://gdlines.com/GD_Galleries/Planning/slides/3nightlights-orig.ht ml


It is like some kind of fantasy railroad set-up, real modelers go for a realistic layout!
 
2013-07-06 02:50:22 AM

SirEattonHogg: There is actually a hobby out there where people actually try to reproduce a railway at a smaller scale?


"Actually" is the most overused word in the english language right now. It is useless word. Remove it from 99% of the sentences in which it's used and the sentences have the exact same meaning and clarity.

Stop using it.

On topic, as someone who was model railroading for many years, I've never understood why some people are obsessive about certain details, but ignore others. These are some amazing layouts, but not weathering the skyscrapers and other buildings make them scream "fake plastic toys." Anal, I know, but my favorite part wasn't running the trains, it was building a lifelike layout.

And again, whenever you feel the urge to put "actually" in a sentence...don't.
 
2013-07-06 02:54:26 AM
galeon.com
 
2013-07-06 03:24:50 AM

SurelyShirley: I realize there's a huge difference between someone's hobby and a professional team of model railroad builders, but this is what 10 years of awesomeness will get you: Miniatur Wunderland

/Excellent German accent thrown in for good measure.


There's just something a bit creepy about watching German people going to excessive extremes (IMHO) with model trains....

/ well, i can appreciate the attention to detail, at least.
 
2013-07-06 04:01:37 AM
I suspect when these guys get 16 years in, they'll have taken over a city block or two http://brickmaniatoys.com/2013/04/30/brickmania-toyworks-open-house-t h is-thursday-may-2nd-5-9pm/

Pictures don't do it justice, my friend is part of that group and the details are crazy on their setups.

/Yes, LEGO
//I went there
 
2013-07-06 04:14:50 AM
 
2013-07-06 04:18:07 AM
I'm a huge fan of model railroading and I realize that it's his hobby and he can do it any way he wants but I'm not that impressed. Everything is so exaggerated. The mountains are ridiculous and the colors are all wrong. I like iron bridges but gimme a break. And what's the deal in the last picture with all the sloppy storage tracks? Doesn't the guy own a straight edge?
 
2013-07-06 05:28:15 AM

Disgruntled Goat: "Actually" is the most overused word in the english language right now. It is useless word. Remove it from 99% of the sentences in which it's used and the sentences have the exact same meaning and clarity.


I've taken the liberty of removing words which don't change your meaning or clarity. Please refrain from being excessively verbose in the future.

/intensifiers are actually quite useful
 
2013-07-06 05:43:15 AM
Does anybody know of any females doing model railroading?
 
2013-07-06 07:43:22 AM
I'll see your railroad and raise you a villa

http://www.diorama-clervaux.com/Blog/index.php
 
2013-07-06 08:33:33 AM
I have a vintage American Flyer set that I took to an old train guy who was trained on them back in the 50s. He had a new Lionel engine that he paid something like $2000 for. It had a huge remote control and had 10 different whistles, several bells (including one that moved). It had digital sounds of the brakes being released and applied as well as acceleration noises.

He had a ball with it and it was just on an 8 foot oval track.
 
2013-07-06 09:07:49 AM

Repo Man: Now here's a case of an amazing obsession with a tragic ending: RC B-52 crash.

The time and money that went into that, only to be turned into a patch of smoking junk.


That is RC aviation, by definition.
 
2013-07-06 09:31:23 AM

20/20: Does anybody know of any females doing model railroading?


Subby's mom.
 
2013-07-06 09:45:44 AM
Northlandz is not far from. It's worth a visit. I'm not really into model trains, but the scale of the place is really impressive. My two year old loved it.

/I wish I had that much free time.
 
2013-07-06 09:52:16 AM
See...I was thinking it was going to be something like this

blokbasteronline.ru
 
2013-07-06 10:57:12 AM
Cuchulane,
This was the only time I thought model trains were fun.,

Where did you get that picture of Michael Bay?
 
2013-07-06 11:34:28 AM
So how long until Superman has to save it?
 
2013-07-06 04:30:58 PM
I live near that place and I drive by it all the time.  Every time I do, I wonder how he stays in business.  That place is almost never busy, at least not like when it first opened.  Then again, he has tons of money so I guess he doesn't need it.
 
2013-07-06 04:34:50 PM
CSB: My favorite pastor loved model trains. He felt that building a whole tiny world and caring for the people in it gave him just the tiniest idea of how God might feel, and helped him keep matters in proper perspective. We kids in the youth group would sometimes go and help him add this or that to the layout, and he used to open up his house once a season to let anyone who felt like watching the trains come observe them, with a little donation jar for the church food bank. Some years his trains were enough to buy Thanksgiving turkeys for every needy family in the area.

We had a soldier come home from Afghanistan with serious PTSD. He could not be in a room without a clear view of the door, he spooked at every noise and even his parents had trouble seeing how bad he was. I remembered him as my babysitter's boyfriend, but he came back looking like a vacant-eyed ghost. Worse, he'd been badly wounded and had some fairly serious mobility problems. Pastor and his wife found out and suggested that the young man come stay with them, explaining that Pastor's arthritis was an issue and they could really use his help. He went to stay with them, and since he'd done work with electronics and computers before and during the war, Pastor pretty much put him to work on the model trains.

Six months or so later, Pastor announced that the Christmas layout was ready, and parishioners should bring any friends or loved ones they wished to come see it that weekend. I took my fiance and siblings, and when we got there, we were just amazed. The entire town, all the tiny buildings, each and every one of them had a different, special and perfectly-appropriate set of Christmas lights, something Pastor had never done before. They were all hand-wired with the tiniest of optical fibers, LEDs and similar. Artificial snow had been painstakingly added with a tiny brush. And around the corner, in the section where Pastor's old hard-wired control board of switches had once been, there was a cheap Acer netbook and a little bay of arduino controllers. Enough space had been freed up by the computerized upgrades for a small model of our local amusement park. The rollercoasters really worked, and with actual chain-lift-and-drop mechanisms, so they were authentic. Our soldier had worked at the park as a young man, and we marveled endlessly over how he'd recreated every ride.

And then we saw him, standing strong on his C-leg, wearing a suit like Pastor's and shaking hands with everyone, grinning like we remembered from when he'd come over to bring our babysitter flowers.

It turned out that seeing the world from God's point of view was just what he needed to understand that what had happened was not his fault. He resumed progress on his engineering degree, graduated, found a job, married our babysitter and is currently attending seminary in the evenings and building portable HO-scale layouts for Children's and VA hospitals on the weekends.
 
2013-07-07 02:37:08 AM

SpiderQueenDemon: CSB: My favorite pastor loved model trains. He felt that building a whole tiny world and caring for the people in it gave him just the tiniest idea of how God might feel, and helped him keep matters in proper perspective. We kids in the youth group would sometimes go and help him add this or that to the layout, and he used to open up his house once a season to let anyone who felt like watching the trains come observe them, with a little donation jar for the church food bank. Some years his trains were enough to buy Thanksgiving turkeys for every needy family in the area.

We had a soldier come home from Afghanistan with serious PTSD. He could not be in a room without a clear view of the door, he spooked at every noise and even his parents had trouble seeing how bad he was. I remembered him as my babysitter's boyfriend, but he came back looking like a vacant-eyed ghost. Worse, he'd been badly wounded and had some fairly serious mobility problems. Pastor and his wife found out and suggested that the young man come stay with them, explaining that Pastor's arthritis was an issue and they could really use his help. He went to stay with them, and since he'd done work with electronics and computers before and during the war, Pastor pretty much put him to work on the model trains.

Six months or so later, Pastor announced that the Christmas layout was ready, and parishioners should bring any friends or loved ones they wished to come see it that weekend. I took my fiance and siblings, and when we got there, we were just amazed. The entire town, all the tiny buildings, each and every one of them had a different, special and perfectly-appropriate set of Christmas lights, something Pastor had never done before. They were all hand-wired with the tiniest of optical fibers, LEDs and similar. Artificial snow had been painstakingly added with a tiny brush. And around the corner, in the section where Pastor's old hard-wired control board of switches had once been, there was a cheap A ...


I really, really want that CSB to be true...
 
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