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2128 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Jul 2013 at 4:48 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-05 04:53:25 PM
If honestly be surprised if we didnt have at least a million people holed up in their rooms here.

Even proportionally, I bet we have more shut ins than Japan.
 
2013-07-05 05:06:30 PM

js34603: If honestly be surprised if we didnt have at least a million people holed up in their rooms here.

Even proportionally, I bet we have more shut ins than Japan.


I'm not as sure.  Japanese culture has this issue of not making waves where American culture bangs down the door and drags you out as with commodore perry.  It is harder to be a shut in in a culture where barging in is considered comedic and necessary.
 
2013-07-05 05:20:56 PM
Domo arigato Mr. Drew blotto.
 
2013-07-05 05:27:34 PM

Gergesa: js34603: If honestly be surprised if we didnt have at least a million people holed up in their rooms here.

Even proportionally, I bet we have more shut ins than Japan.

I'm not as sure.  Japanese culture has this issue of not making waves where American culture bangs down the door and drags you out as with commodore perry.  It is harder to be a shut in in a culture where barging in is considered comedic and necessary.


Also, I've read that Japan has a culture of "family can solve it" when it comes to social/psychological disorders. So instead of getting professional treatment, someone with lets say, Asberger's, is going to just spend more time around their family or something (I have no idea what the the family would actually try).

So lots of these shut-ins have undiagnosed disorders that would be diagnosed and treated in the US.
 
2013-07-05 05:30:02 PM
Perhaps they are suffering from The Vapors?
 
2013-07-05 05:31:40 PM

Gergesa: I'm not as sure.  Japanese culture has this issue of not making waves where American culture bangs down the door and drags you out as with commodore perry.  It is harder to be a shut in in a culture where barging in is considered comedic and necessary.


I'd say it's just as easy to be a shut in in America.

Order food online or have Groceries delivered to your house.  Buy and resell items through eBay and other online stores to make money.  Maybe even become a web designer.  Play Xbox360 or PS3 for your entertainment etc.

The thing that makes Japan so different is the amount of effort that they place on keeping such matters hidden.  Normally a shut in from Japan will live with a relative and the relative will support them, while shut ins from America are generally kicked out after a certain period of time.  The Japanese thought is "I wouldn't want this degenerate to embarrass or dishonor the family name"  While the American thought is "if you are going to make a fool of yourself, do it on your own dime."

Yes there are shut ins that live at home in America and there are shut ins that live on their own in Japan.  But I think you would find that the numbers in each category are skewed towards the countries mentality.

Also one recourse that American shut ins have that Japanese do not is that they can go online to be in society.  You might think "Silly afro, the Japanese are always online!", but they are online under pseudonyms and they rarely like being outed, so they change their alias when they feel people might be getting to know who they are. Meanwhile Americans are on twitter, which is linked to their Fark profile, which is linked to their Linkedin account, which leads you to their Xbox Live profile, which shows you their Facebook account which happens to have their real name and address easily viewed on their public profile.

The amount of attention paid to privacy in each culture is different.
 
2013-07-05 05:57:54 PM

degenerate-afro: I'd say it's just as easy to be a shut in in America.


There is clearly only one way to settle this.  We must capture an American shut in and then go to Japan, capture a shut in there, drag them both to a neutral territory like Switzerland and observe the behavior that follows.
 
2013-07-05 06:02:53 PM

Gergesa: degenerate-afro: I'd say it's just as easy to be a shut in in America.

There is clearly only one way to settle this.  We must capture an American shut in and then go to Japan, capture a shut in there, drag them both to a neutral territory like Switzerland and observe the behavior that follows.


Awkward stares?
 
2013-07-05 06:04:59 PM
A lot of this is cultural. Traditionally, in Japan, people live with their parents until they get married. It's almost the complete opposite of the USA mindset. In America, if a guy in his late 20s lives with his parents you might call him a "loser" or at least wonder why he doesn't move out. In Japan there's no negative stigma at all. If you're unmarried and you live alone people will wonder why... "does he come from a broken home?" "are there problems in his family?"

There are exceptions of course. If you're from a rural area and you land a job in Tokyo you're going to live on your own, but if you live in the same area as your parents and you're unmarried it's simply weird to live alone.

A lot of the changes could be related to the fact that Japanese people are getting married much later than in the past. The average age for marriage is now well over 30, and some are choosing not to marry at all, while just a few decades ago it was common to marry in your early-mid 20s.

The other issue of course is the ridiculously high cost of housing in major Japanese cities. There's simply no way to afford decent housing on entry-level/low wage jobs.

As for why people tend to stay home all the time rather than go out and socialize. I would suspect that has to do with advances in technology. I haven't really met anyone who fits this description, but then again if they never leave their homes how would I?
 
2013-07-05 06:11:51 PM

N3X3N: As for why people tend to stay home all the time rather than go out and socialize. I would suspect that has to do with advances in technology. I haven't really met anyone who fits this description, but then again if they never leave their homes how would I?


Visit 2ch.
 
2013-07-05 06:46:26 PM
The New York Times has great article about Hikikomori a few years ago:
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/15/magazine/15japanese.html?pagewante d= all
 
2013-07-05 07:00:45 PM

degenerate-afro: Gergesa: I'm not as sure.  Japanese culture has this issue of not making waves where American culture bangs down the door and drags you out as with commodore perry.  It is harder to be a shut in in a culture where barging in is considered comedic and necessary.

I'd say it's just as easy to be a shut in in America.

Order food online or have Groceries delivered to your house.  Buy and resell items through eBay and other online stores to make money.  Maybe even become a web designer.  Play Xbox360 or PS3 for your entertainment etc.


Ayup. Internet + Bad economy = more shut ins.

Some industry observers have speculated that influences such as increasing dependence on social media connections, concern about the environment and the allure of living in bustling urban areas have been behind Generation Y's downshifting affinity for automobiles. Nearly half of drivers age 18 to 24 told technology research firm Gartner Inc. they'd choose the Internet over a car.
 
2013-07-05 07:55:17 PM

N3X3N: As for why people tend to stay home all the time rather than go out and socialize. I would suspect that has to do with advances in technology.


JRPGs are getting too long. The new Final Fantasy is a big hot mess, and do you have any idea how long it takes to get 100% completion of all the alchemy items in Dragon Quest 9?
 
2013-07-05 08:00:19 PM
This was covered in World War Z.
 
2013-07-05 08:03:54 PM

Fireproof: Gergesa: js34603: If honestly be surprised if we didnt have at least a million people holed up in their rooms here.

Even proportionally, I bet we have more shut ins than Japan.

I'm not as sure.  Japanese culture has this issue of not making waves where American culture bangs down the door and drags you out as with commodore perry.  It is harder to be a shut in in a culture where barging in is considered comedic and necessary.

Also, I've read that Japan has a culture of "family can solve it" when it comes to social/psychological disorders. So instead of getting professional treatment, someone with lets say, Asberger's, is going to just spend more time around their family or something (I have no idea what the the family would actually try).

So lots of these shut-ins have undiagnosed disorders that would be diagnosed and treated in the US.


Asbergers?  That's funny - made me think "ass burgers".

Why are so many people illiterate?
 
2013-07-05 09:37:19 PM

Johnson: Perhaps they are suffering from The Vapors?


If they moved more northerly they'd perish from Fan Death.
 
2013-07-05 10:15:07 PM
The average age of hikikomori also seems to have risen over the last two decades. Before it was 21 - now it is 32.' Why is this happening?
Interesting, seems these 21 year-olds aged an average of ten years during the past decade.
 
2013-07-06 12:41:54 AM
i.imgur.com
Challenge accepted.
 
2013-07-06 04:37:35 AM

moviemarketing: The average age of hikikomori also seems to have risen over the last two decades. Before it was 21 - now it is 32.' Why is this happening?
Interesting, seems these 21 year-olds aged an average of ten years during the past decade.


Guys, I just ran the numbers at my university computer labiatchecks out.
 
2013-07-06 07:37:20 AM

moviemarketing: The average age of hikikomori also seems to have risen over the last two decades. Before it was 21 - now it is 32.' Why is this happening?
Interesting, seems these 21 year-olds aged an average of ten years during the past decade.


They have figured out a way to slow the aging process to half-rate, this is a breakthrough of monumental proportions!
 
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