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(Wimp) Video Amazon.com fills your order using robots. They also use machines which are programmed to move and perform certain tasks automatically   (wimp.com) divider line 36
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3751 clicks; posted to Business » on 04 Jul 2013 at 5:34 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-04 05:03:19 PM
1) amazing robots
2) oh subby - you made me lol
 
2013-07-04 06:29:55 PM
Can't wait until they remove the human worker from the equation.
 
2013-07-04 06:40:03 PM
They've been using some sort of automation for a long time now, the Kiva's are just the newest iteration.

// lots of interesting things going on in the world of robotics now.

For example, it's hard for me to look at some of the stuff they're doing with Quadcopters without immediately thinking "Skynet".

http://www.ted.com/talks/raffaello_d_andrea_the_astounding_athletic_ po wer_of_quadcopters.html

Moving goods around a warehouse just pales in comparison.
 
2013-07-04 06:49:37 PM

Arthur Jumbles: Can't wait until they remove the human worker from the equation.




Came here to say that. Cool tech, but it this company, just like the car companies that switched to robot assembly, killed the american economy. The few automotive plants i have been to? All robot assembly, and a very few techs walking around babysitting them. Greed, under the guise of better production, has murdered the economy, along with cheap ass crap from foreign countries showing up on our shelves.
 
2013-07-04 06:57:26 PM
That is mechanically hypnotizing...
 
2013-07-04 07:02:03 PM

Bit'O'Gristle: Arthur Jumbles: Can't wait until they remove the human worker from the equation.

Came here to say that. Cool tech, but it this company, just like the car companies that switched to robot assembly, killed the american economy. The few automotive plants i have been to? All robot assembly, and a very few techs walking around babysitting them. Greed, under the guise of better production, has murdered the economy, along with cheap ass crap from foreign countries showing up on our shelves.


Yeah, just like mechanics of old who murdered the agrarian economy with mechanized agriculture. Now 90% of working age people are unemployed because the farm work they used to do is done with machines.

Wait...
 
2013-07-04 07:09:12 PM
Greed, under the guise of better production, has murdered the economy

Exactly... While watching the video, all I could think was, A)  That sure cost a lot of workers their jobs and, B) that is sure a lot of power being used to bring up allllllll those products to the front, so one person can pick out one product, then run allllll the other shiat back where it was.... just so they can not have other workers employed and have to pay them.

/and now I would like to pee in one of those damned robots and watch it short out...
//or line`em up and I'll short out a whole farkin` row of them - just let me finish this beer.
 
2013-07-04 07:23:25 PM

Arthur Jumbles: Can't wait until they remove the human worker from the equation.


I'm sure some of those people putting together the orders of sex toys and lube will miss those fun times at work.
 
2013-07-04 07:27:31 PM

Arthur Jumbles: Can't wait until they remove the human worker from the equation.


Bit'O'Gristle: Greed, under the guise of better production, has murdered the economy, along with cheap ass crap from foreign countries showing up on our shelves.


No, we as consumers fell for the BS theory that one can get "more for less." Consumers demand more for less, which in the long term is not possible. So in the mean time the process has to be cheapened and cheapened until it collapses.

Consumers who don't understand the difference between 'value' and 'price' are the major cause of this problem.
 
2013-07-04 08:24:58 PM
I, for one, welcome our new product-picking overlords.
 
2013-07-04 08:49:41 PM
That's really neat.  Thanks subby.

Sad to see all the Luddites in the thread though.
 
2013-07-04 09:32:28 PM
For those against robots, ever see how amazon ran with real workers? it was a horribly stressful underpaid jobs.  It was only a matter of time before robots replaced them.  Some tasks are just better suited by robots, sorry that's just how it is.
 
2013-07-04 10:07:38 PM
eventually the idea that you have to work to live will go away. then things like this will be met with "awesome, that frees up that many more people to actually live their lives instead of slaving away" instead of "oh man, the lost jobs will suck"

/we can only sustain an economy built on paper growth for so long.
 
2013-07-04 10:08:24 PM

KCCO: That's really neat.  Thanks subby.

Sad to see all the Luddites in the thread though.


We're not Luddites, we wouldn't be on the internet if we were. We are voicing concerns on how the economy is being pushed towards automation and how that effects employees overall (especially the lower skilled employees). Over time we will need to find some sort of new way to reorganize the economy to allow a non-working population that is given the means to live on without contributing anything, otherwise these people will soon be robbing your houses and killing you for your wallet. Unfortunately it seems that all automation is being used for, is so the people who run the companies don't need any employees to run it, and therefor don't have to pay a great many people to make them money anymore.
 
2013-07-04 10:21:36 PM
Do they have gay robots?
 
2013-07-04 10:29:14 PM

SuperT: eventually the idea that you have to work to live will go away. then things like this will be met with "awesome, that frees up that many more people to actually live their lives instead of slaving away" instead of "oh man, the lost jobs will suck"

/we can only sustain an economy built on paper growth for so long.


I agree with what you are saying here, but I think the transition to a post-Industrial future is going to be pretty rough...

/ Bell riots...
 
2013-07-04 10:31:07 PM

BalugaJoe: Do they have gay robots?


They're all gay. Until engineers figure out how to programme them to reproduce. Forget about gays and lesbians. When are the right wingers and conservative theists going to go after robosexuals and robot marriage?
 
2013-07-04 10:39:23 PM
cdn3.whatculture.com
 
2013-07-04 10:45:34 PM

KCCO: That's really neat.  Thanks subby.

Sad to see all the Luddites in the thread though.


Not really a Luddite here ( and I do use Amazon for many things), but after watching that I can see MY job being automated in < 15 years.....and I do have mixed feelings about all of this....

/ Robots are still cool in my book, however...
// enjoyed watching that video.
 
2013-07-04 10:47:58 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: KCCO: That's really neat.  Thanks subby.

Sad to see all the Luddites in the thread though.

We're not Luddites, we wouldn't be on the internet if we were. We are voicing concerns on how the economy is being pushed towards automation and how that effects employees overall (especially the lower skilled employees). Over time we will need to find some sort of new way to reorganize the economy to allow a non-working population that is given the means to live on without contributing anything, otherwise these people will soon be robbing your houses and killing you for your wallet. Unfortunately it seems that all automation is being used for, is so the people who run the companies don't need any employees to run it, and therefor don't have to pay a great many people to make them money anymore.


I agree with most of your post.  Except for the non skilled remark.  Most of automation has actually replaced skilled workers and not low or unskilled workers. Yes assembling a vehicle is a skilled profession, yes mining coal is a skilled profession.  Yes farming is a skilled profession.
 
2013-07-04 10:51:17 PM
As a warehouse logistics guy for the spare parts division of a major auto manufacturer, this makes me drool.  Our warehouses have the software in place to set up areas for parts based various pieces of criteria, one of which is popularity.  The more popular the part, the more likely it's going to get placed into a location that's easy to pick from.  It's great, but it requires a lot of manual labor to move things out of the way as some parts become less popular and others become more popular.  A system like this blows my mind.  Not only does it automatically move the slower moving stock to locations in the back of the warehouse when it returns the stack/pod to the warehouse floor during the normal picking process, but I bet they can run an analysis periodically (say, once a month or so) to do "maintenance moves" to determine old stock that needs to move out of prime locations, and then have the robots perform those moves automatically.  Man, that would be sweet.
 
2013-07-04 11:05:10 PM
It's sad to see all the jobs lost, but as pointed out, this has happened before.

The first Industral Revolution made it possible for a few farmers to feed many times their number (machines, artificial fertilizers, transportation to markets) and a few workers to make everything formerly made by journey men artisans. The peasants and artisans, who had accounted for up to 98% of the population moved to industry and lower middle class jobs requiring literacy. The losers were those who could not learn to read and those killed by machines.

Some jobs went to the third world in the form of slavery on coffee, tea, cocoa, banana, and other plantations.

The second Industrial Revolution mechanized manufacturing and brought machines into mining and lumbering. This began to wipe out industral jobs except for supervisors and a few machine minders.

Some jobs went to the third world in the form of garbage pickers and ultra-low wage factory slaves.

The third Industrial Revolution is wiping out jobs in sales, clerical positions, typists, secretaries (except for top executive secretaries). Machines are not only making most goods, they are selling, packing, shipping, and delivering them.

Some jobs have gone to the call centres and performance centres of the third world as wage and cubicle slaves perform work formerly done by the lower middle classes.

In short, each technical and organizational revolution has wiped out one of the lower classes. Serfs and slaves couldn't compete against industrious self-exploiting paid workers and they were the first to go (except for those whose jobs in cotton-picking and flower-cutting have moved to the third world).

All of the progress and much of the misery of the last 200 years is tied to this repeated process. Yes, people eventually move on to the smaller number of jobs that can still be done only by humans. But in each wave of advance by the robots and mechanization, a class is lost and so are many people who simply can't move on to the next phase of work.

We need to think about this, because after the last industrial workers lose their well-paid union jobs, the middle classes are next. In SF stories, expert software and robots have replaced the journalists, the lawyers, the doctors, the nurses, the school-teachers, and so forth.

We, the middle classes of the liberal democratic or social democratic worlds, are next on the chopping block.

Meanwhile the rich get inexorably richer, and where they are not hobbled by leftists and revolution, more powerful and more destructive not only of social and cultural and political values, but of the environment.

Perhaps we will survive by moving on to virtual jobs in virtual offices, but perhaps not. Each time this has happened, nobody could foresee the consequences. It was Heaven or Hell, or a mixture of both, but we could still lose this Game of Drones to the owners, who have been the only consistent winners.

In one of the more prophetic works of SF, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. foresaw in Player Piano an America where the only real jobs left were boss and secretary, where machines had replaced all other meaningful work and the masses competed for Government make-work jobs as gardners on highway medians and the like. Ironically, his brother was an engineer with IBM Inc. in Upstate New York (Armonk, IIRC). His brother was building our world and the future while he was lamenting the degradation and the humiliation of mankind by its own reified labour (as Karl Marx called capital correctly).

Your hard work comes to you one day and hands you a pink slip. Your services and thus your life are no longer required. That is what Karl Marx was natterng on about, well before the Second Industrial Revolution got fully underway.

I don't expect things will chang much. We are on the chopping block, but I am already middle aged and nobody is going to cry for me if I starve to death or die prematurely because of the Third or Fourth Industrial Revolution.

All our utopias and dystopias are the same place--our future, and, insofar as they are satires and commentaries, our present and our past as well.

Good luck, all. We are going to need it. Except in the "third" world, where the outsourced wealth creation is still lifting up humanity from drudgery and installing it in dullness and constant fear of punishment by lower management.

Take a look at the stats:  what percentage of which countries still have peasants, still have industrial workers, still have white and pink collar jobs?

It will take a while for the majority of humanity to be processed through the Dark Satanic mills of agriculture, industry, extractive industry, and manufacturing, but then what? There is already a constant shortage of jobs because it suits the employers to keep the workers hungry and as desperate as possible. Keeps wages down, profits up, and the unemployment rate in the "natural range" which is best for the boss classes.

Meanwhile machines are eliminating the last vestiges of cooking and household crafts except as hipster forms of display and competition--hobbies and arts.

Everything archaic ends up being done as a form of display or as an "art".

Think of horses:  they survived the need to work for their living by becoming luxery items. The rich and the well-to-do can afford dressage, steeplechase, polo, bridal paths, etc., but nobody needs a horse to pull a plow or a dust cart.

Are you a man or a luxury item?
 
2013-07-04 11:13:35 PM

Forbidden Doughnut: SuperT: eventually the idea that you have to work to live will go away. then things like this will be met with "awesome, that frees up that many more people to actually live their lives instead of slaving away" instead of "oh man, the lost jobs will suck"

/we can only sustain an economy built on paper growth for so long.

I agree with what you are saying here, but I think the transition to a post-Industrial future is going to be pretty rough...

/ Bell riots...


it won't be as nice as the bell ritos. One something will happen that will snap the poor from their stupor, and there will be blood. I think it will engulf the entire world. The masses will realize their enemies are not each other, but their own plutocratic governments
 
2013-07-04 11:16:29 PM

AstralRunner: Bit'O'Gristle: Arthur Jumbles: Can't wait until they remove the human worker from the equation.

Came here to say that. Cool tech, but it this company, just like the car companies that switched to robot assembly, killed the american economy. The few automotive plants i have been to? All robot assembly, and a very few techs walking around babysitting them. Greed, under the guise of better production, has murdered the economy, along with cheap ass crap from foreign countries showing up on our shelves.

Yeah, just like mechanics of old who murdered the agrarian economy with mechanized agriculture. Now 90% of working age people are unemployed because the farm work they used to do is done with machines.

Wait...


For what?

The goal of automation is and always has been to eliminate labor.  Labor is the only sort of  job available for most people (Whether you're pushing a mouse or digging a ditch, you're a laborer.)  So if people are to survive, we will have to replace labor as their role in the economy with something else that a human can provide.

What will that look like?  How  will I earn more or less?
 
2013-07-04 11:41:19 PM

Bit'O'Gristle: Came here to say that. Cool tech, but it this company, just like the car companies that switched to robot assembly, killed the american economy.


lolwut?
 
2013-07-05 01:39:10 AM
Amazon.com Some contractor fills your order using robots overworked-to-fark people so that Amazon can wash themselves clean of anything wrong should it happen.

FTFY, subby.
 
2013-07-05 01:59:08 AM

SuperT: eventually the idea that you have to work to live will go away. then things like this will be met with [redacted Hayekian stock phrase] instead of "oh man, the lost jobs will suck"


Wishful thinking.  It's all fine and dandy until your job is lost, and that the replacement line of work isn't anywhere close to arriving as fast as the destruction arrived.
 
2013-07-05 05:58:57 AM

FatMason: A system like this blows my mind.


What blows my mind - if it actually works this way - is that in addition to the whole warehouse being fluid... the pods could actually be totally abstract. Like, conventionally you'd have one big box of widgets and to pick a widget, you go to that box (or maybe have the box come to you.) But what if that pod has a box of widgets on it until they run out, and then it just doesn't have widgets anymore? That is, to restock widgets you just cut open a case and find the nearest pod with room on it. The system could simply be tracking which pods have cases of widgets left, and the most popular items might be available on multiple pods at any given time.

(I'm a freelance DBA/software engineer and mostly end up doing call center work... but have done a few very small warehouse implementations and I think I'd really enjoy working on warehouse efficiency problems on a bigger scale.)
 
2013-07-05 07:29:54 AM
If you want your kid to have a future, convince him to become a software engineer.  The person you didn't see in the video is the guy refining the algorithm for the robots.  It's complicated and the people who do it get paid a lot.
 
2013-07-05 07:52:04 AM

Kibbler: If you want your kid to have a future, convince him to become a software engineer.  The person you didn't see in the video is the guy refining the algorithm for the robots.  It's complicated and the people who do it get paid a lot.


But then you have to compete against an army of Indian and Chinese engineers.
 
2013-07-05 08:39:45 AM

Kibbler: If you want your kid to have a future, convince him to become a software engineer.  The person you didn't see in the video is the guy refining the algorithm for the robots.  It's complicated and the people who do it get paid a lot.


Because every kid is infinitely programmable into  whatever the business world needs.  Bullshiat.  Only geeks who think people are just meat computers believe that.
 
2013-07-05 09:23:19 AM

mrlewish: DarkSoulNoHope: KCCO: That's really neat.  Thanks subby.

Sad to see all the Luddites in the thread though.

We're not Luddites, we wouldn't be on the internet if we were. We are voicing concerns on how the economy is being pushed towards automation and how that effects employees overall (especially the lower skilled employees). Over time we will need to find some sort of new way to reorganize the economy to allow a non-working population that is given the means to live on without contributing anything, otherwise these people will soon be robbing your houses and killing you for your wallet. Unfortunately it seems that all automation is being used for, is so the people who run the companies don't need any employees to run it, and therefor don't have to pay a great many people to make them money anymore.

I agree with most of your post.  Except for the non skilled remark.  Most of automation has actually replaced skilled workers and not low or unskilled workers. Yes assembling a vehicle is a skilled profession, yes mining coal is a skilled profession.  Yes farming is a skilled profession.


So you do agree with all of my post then, because I didn't say "non-skilled", I said low skilled. As in jobs that only need minor training to learn and apply that work (non-college degree jobs). Those jobs will be replaced by automation (the ones that haven't already) and higher skilled jobs will be next and/or replaced by lower paid employees in countries whom don't care about the employees' well being (in terms of lack of labor laws and/or employment law enforcement).

These people who own the companies and are buying machines to replace their workforce are not inspired by Gene Roddenbury's vision of the future for the rest of us, but instead are trying to impliment Ann Rand's sadistic dream world.
 
2013-07-05 12:21:11 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: mrlewish: DarkSoulNoHope: KCCO: That's really neat.  Thanks subby.

Sad to see all the Luddites in the thread though.

We're not Luddites, we wouldn't be on the internet if we were. We are voicing concerns on how the economy is being pushed towards automation and how that effects employees overall (especially the lower skilled employees). Over time we will need to find some sort of new way to reorganize the economy to allow a non-working population that is given the means to live on without contributing anything, otherwise these people will soon be robbing your houses and killing you for your wallet. Unfortunately it seems that all automation is being used for, is so the people who run the companies don't need any employees to run it, and therefor don't have to pay a great many people to make them money anymore.

I agree with most of your post.  Except for the non skilled remark.  Most of automation has actually replaced skilled workers and not low or unskilled workers. Yes assembling a vehicle is a skilled profession, yes mining coal is a skilled profession.  Yes farming is a skilled profession.

So you do agree with all of my post then, because I didn't say "non-skilled", I said low skilled. As in jobs that only need minor training to learn and apply that work (non-college degree jobs). Those jobs will be replaced by automation (the ones that haven't already) and higher skilled jobs will be next and/or replaced by lower paid employees in countries whom don't care about the employees' well being (in terms of lack of labor laws and/or employment law enforcement).

These people who own the companies and are buying machines to replace their workforce are not inspired by Gene Roddenbury's vision of the future for the rest of us, but instead are trying to impliment Ann Rand's sadistic dream world.


www.startrek.com

...hence the word; sabotage.
 
2013-07-05 02:12:44 PM

digidorm: That is, to restock widgets you just cut open a case and find the nearest pod with room on it. The system could simply be tracking which pods have cases of widgets left, and the most popular items might be available on multiple pods at any given time.


Also a pod doesn't have to hold a single type of product. For example if brand X dildos are commonly bought with brand Y or brand Z batteries then it could reduce traffic and increase throughput to have all in the same pod.
 
2013-07-05 10:51:07 PM

HairBolus: digidorm: That is, to restock widgets you just cut open a case and find the nearest pod with room on it. The system could simply be tracking which pods have cases of widgets left, and the most popular items might be available on multiple pods at any given time.

Also a pod doesn't have to hold a single type of product. For example if brand X dildos are commonly bought with brand Y or brand Z batteries then it could reduce traffic and increase throughput to have all in the same pod.


Or for the entertainment things you could organize the pods by genre or artist or new releases
 
2013-07-06 12:01:29 AM
All this talk of robots taking human jobs is unfounded paranoia. Robots will never displace human workers.

Now excuse me while I go watch the RedBox movie I just rented.
 
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