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(Daily Mail)   Scientists study the possibility of teeth that can regrow themselves. Desperate patients hope it's not pulp fiction   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 37
    More: Spiffy, stem cells, symplectic filling, stem cell therapy, growth factors, bone marrow transplant, tooth enamels, geriatrics, cell death  
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2043 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jul 2013 at 12:19 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-04 11:06:05 AM  
Meh, one day we will actually regrow the whole tooth.  It'll be a while, but it'll happen.
 
2013-07-04 11:09:52 AM  

basemetal: Meh, one day we will actually regrow the whole tooth.  It'll be a while, but it'll happen.


I hope so; that'll really allow me to reinvestigate meth as a hobby
 
2013-07-04 12:18:00 PM  

SmackLT: basemetal: Meh, one day we will actually regrow the whole tooth.  It'll be a while, but it'll happen.

I hope so; that'll really allow me to reinvestigate meth as a hobby


Cheaper and less frustrating to take up golf.
 
2013-07-04 12:46:02 PM  
Not unless they're someone else's dental stem cells.

Why on Earth would I regrow the teeth that caused me blinding pain my entire life, despite rigorous care and monthly dentist visits, then spend thousands upon thousands more to fix them again and again?

F*ck that. I'm getting dentures this year, and it is the best decision I've made in years.

I can't wait to eat solid food again, not feel like someone drive nails into my jaw, not have stomach pain from the bottles of ibuprofen and aspirin I eat every week ... sh*t, I've forgotten how to SMILE.

Then maybe I could buy my own house instead of helping pay for dentists' houses.
 
2013-07-04 12:49:38 PM  
Every time I floss, I can't help wondering why we're still pulling a string manually through our teeth when we have advanced our IT to such a state that we can tweet the state of bowel movements to the world. Something similar to a fluoride tray, placed on the teeth for ten seconds, would be the dental care of a high tech society.
 
2013-07-04 01:10:49 PM  

EngineerAU: Every time I floss, I can't help wondering why we're still pulling a string manually through our teeth when we have advanced our IT to such a state that we can tweet the state of bowel movements to the world. Something similar to a fluoride tray, placed on the teeth for ten seconds, would be the dental care of a high tech society.


Get to work on that, there's money in gadgets.

/even if they don't work that well
 
2013-07-04 01:27:58 PM  
I'm all for this. You'd think after 10,000+ years SOMEONE would've evolved better teeth by now. It's a pandemic and long term problem.
 
2013-07-04 01:47:41 PM  

EngineerAU: Every time I floss, I can't help wondering why we're still pulling a string manually through our teeth when we have advanced our IT to such a state that we can tweet the state of bowel movements to the world. Something similar to a fluoride tray, placed on the teeth for ten seconds, would be the dental care of a high tech society.


Or just re-engineer the microbes in the mouth to not produce plaque.  Hell, students have re-engineered e. Coli to not smell like strawberries instead of crap, surely this can't be that hard.
 
2013-07-04 01:51:45 PM  
Well, all I have to say is:

Smile though your heart is aching
Smile even though it's breaking
When there are clouds in the sky, you'll get by
If you smile through your fear and sorrow
Smile and maybe tomorrow
You'll see the sun come shining through for you
 
2013-07-04 01:53:43 PM  
This is a little too late for me because I have had both eye teeth undergo resorption, where the cells basically do some weird thing where they destroy healthy tissue and hollow out the teeth. Had to have both yanked and then replaced with implants, which ran a good $5k per tooth because my shiatty insurance doesn't have implant coverage.
 
2013-07-04 02:12:27 PM  

basemetal: Get to work on that, there's money in gadgets.

/even if they don't work that well


Should have thought of that before Billy Mays died. The "but wait, there's more..." would have been epic even if it was something dumb like a book light for your nose.
 
2013-07-04 02:14:49 PM  
I'm currently in the middle of the long process of getting dental implants.

// had two teeth cracked over a decade ago from chomping down on a fragment of rib bone. Had a double root canal. FF to recent times and the root canal's were failing.

Rather than trying to recrown the teeth, I had them yanked out. Now I have to go back to get holes drilled into my jawbone and titanium posts inserted.
 
2013-07-04 02:34:40 PM  
Never had a cavity in my life.
.
/40+ yrs old
//suck it, gummers!
 
2013-07-04 02:36:34 PM  

lordargent: I'm currently in the middle of the long process of getting dental implants.

// had two teeth cracked over a decade ago from chomping down on a fragment of rib bone. Had a double root canal. FF to recent times and the root canal's were failing.

Rather than trying to recrown the teeth, I had them yanked out. Now I have to go back to get holes drilled into my jawbone and titanium posts inserted.


Sounds painful, I cracked my front teeth in half, I was a wee bit drunk and the pavement attacked me. I've had veneers put on, but the dentist said they don't last forever, so I'm living in fear of the day they fall out and either I have to get replacements or look for something more permanent, since it cost around £2-3000 I have occasionally pondered replacing them as you describe. Is it painful? Or particularly expensive?
 
2013-07-04 02:45:55 PM  
Yup. Got the small, straight teeth that didn't need braces, but don't last long. Coupled with being hit by a car(hit and run) that dislocated my jaw and smashed most of my back teeth apart, not so good. Looking at many years of expensive extractions and doubly expensive implants. Not so sure about the implants.....My dentist has a great little placard in his reception area showing how dental insurance coverage is basically the same amount of coverage it was in the 50's. Kind of a joke. So much for the Mid-life Porsche, eh?
 
2013-07-04 02:56:53 PM  

EngineerAU: why we're still pulling a string manually through our teeth when we have advanced our IT to such a state that we can tweet the state of bowel movements to the world.


Could it be, and I'm just guessing here, that comparing information processing (very little energy per bit, almost immaterial) to the physical world doesn't make sense?
 
2013-07-04 02:56:58 PM  
Slaxl: Sounds painful

Not painful, just a pain in the ass.

Extracting the teeth was easy (they had already been root canaled, so there were no nerve endings in the teeth, no nerve endings == minimal pain).

There aren't many nerve endings in the jawbone either, so the drilling should have minimal pain as well.

There is, however, one big nerve along the bottom, which is why they have to give you an MRI (that most dental insurance doesn't cover ... but medical insurance might) to see how deep they can drill without hitting that nerve).

The whole procedure though, takes some time.

First, you get the teeth extracted (and that takes several weeks to several months to heal).

(and if you're unlucky your bone won't grow back fast enough by itself, so you'll have to get bone grafts, thankfully I avoided this step)

Then you gotta get scanned for the drill guides and wait for those to be made.

Then you gotta get drilled and have the titanium posts inserted (and that takes several weeks to several months to heal).

Then you get the topcaps

Then you get cast for the crowns, and wait for those to be made.

Finally you can get the crowns put in.

// in my case, throw in some vacations, and some ridiculous projects at work that required long work days, along with dentist and specialist surgeon hours. And I'm looking at about 9 months total (and about $3000-$5000) to get all of this said and done for two teeth.
 
2013-07-04 02:58:41 PM  
EngineerAU: why we're still pulling a string manually through our teeth

I don't know, why are you?

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-07-04 03:35:54 PM  

lordargent:

I don't know, why are you?

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 425x500]


Actually I own a waterpik but find it more trouble than flossing since I can floss while watching tv, Also the waterpik isn't great at removing plaque on the sides of teeth though it is good at removing any bits of food that are stuck in between teeth. Filling the waterpik half and half with water and mouthwash does make for fresher breath so that's a bonus. Still not a total replacement for flossing.

Quantum Apostrophe: Could it be, and I'm just guessing here, that comparing information processing (very little energy per bit, almost immaterial) to the physical world doesn't make sense?


You're looking at things a bit too literally. Bet you're fun at parties.
 
2013-07-04 03:37:52 PM  
EngineerAU


You should ask him about human spaceflight.......
 
2013-07-04 03:43:43 PM  
Water picks don't work as good as good ole mechanical floss at disrupting biofilms.
 
2013-07-04 03:46:37 PM  

EngineerAU: You're looking at things a bit too literally. Bet you're fun at parties.


I wasn't aware we were at a party. If that's the case, let me get naked first.

FlippityFlap: EngineerAU

You should ask him about human spaceflight.......


You mean all 400 kilometers of it? I've had longer bowel movements on IBS night.
 
2013-07-04 03:55:19 PM  
EngineerAU: Actually I own a waterpik but find it more trouble than flossing since I can floss while watching tv, Also the waterpik isn't great at removing plaque on the sides of teeth though it is good at removing any bits of food that are stuck in between teeth. Filling the waterpik half and half with water and mouthwash does make for fresher breath so that's a bonus. Still not a total replacement for flossing.

Yeah, I still do both as well. The pik a few times per week with some baking soda to 'sandblast' things clean.

// Most of my dental problems were caused by abuse, not bacteria (EX, cracking hazelnuts open with my molars). But I brush and floss even more now because I don't need to add to the tooth issues I already have.

When my family rolled the wheel of medical maladies, it came up teeth.

I wish I could take my medical insurance and apply it to dental work as well because there's nothing else wrong with me medical wise.
 
2013-07-04 04:30:12 PM  
Dentist's motto:

Drill 'em, fill 'em and bill 'em.
 
2013-07-04 06:30:56 PM  

ajgeek: I'm all for this. You'd think after 10,000+ years SOMEONE would've evolved better teeth by now. It's a pandemic and long term problem.


Just stop the English from breeding.
 
2013-07-04 06:37:06 PM  
How about we introduce the genes that would allow us to constantly be renewing our teeth like a shark. A tooth falls out, no problem a new one has already started pushing its way up, and under that a new tooth is already beginning to form... That would be cool.
 
2013-07-04 08:04:15 PM  

Wolf892: How about we introduce the genes that would allow us to constantly be renewing our teeth like a shark. A tooth falls out, no problem a new one has already started pushing its way up, and under that a new tooth is already beginning to form... That would be cool.


The problem is regrowing a tooth that fits into the opposing teeth as well as the original, like it does now. Notice that a shark doesn't have to worry about that little detail.
 
2013-07-04 08:40:39 PM  

Smoking GNU: Wolf892: How about we introduce the genes that would allow us to constantly be renewing our teeth like a shark. A tooth falls out, no problem a new one has already started pushing its way up, and under that a new tooth is already beginning to form... That would be cool.

The problem is regrowing a tooth that fits into the opposing teeth as well as the original, like it does now. Notice that a shark doesn't have to worry about that little detail.


The current thought is that the tooth will grow into the available space, similar to how we can currently regrow lost fingertips. (The fingertip doesn't just continue to grow and grow, the cells involved somehow know just when to stop.

Or, they could potentially use a framework for the cells to grow into.

With the tooth, it might require braces to keep it inline, but it is not going to grow all wild and gappy like a shark mouth either. Whatevr the result, it has to be better than the ancient tech we are using now. All of these advancements in computing and we are still drilling into and yanking out teeth.

// while fingertips regrow, the fingerprint pattrrn will be marred from the remodeling.

// sliced off a small hink from the tip of my thumb once while chopping potatoes. Thought I would have a flat thumb, but they put some sort off material on it and it grew back to a rounded shape.
 
2013-07-04 08:44:00 PM  

lordargent: All of these advancements in computing and we are still drilling into and yanking out teeth.


Could it be, and I'm just guessing here, that comparing information processing (very little energy per bit, almost immaterial) to the physical world doesn't make sense?

Allow me to demonstrate:

All of these advancements in computing and we are still eating and drinking food.

Did that make any sense whatsoever?
 
2013-07-04 09:12:12 PM  
Quantum Apostrophe: Could it be, and I'm just guessing here, that comparing information processing (very little energy per bit, almost immaterial) to the physical world doesn't make sense?

Well, since you brought it up, it's rant time.

In the computing/tech world in the past few decades, we have thrown away our old CRT TVs, moved on to LCDs, plasmas and now are on the verge of OLED TVs becoming the standard. We developed E-ink, are getting to the point where SSDs are going to be cost effective for the average consumer. We have advanced robotics to the point where we have a car sized rover rolling around on mars (while here at home, people have vaccum cleaners that automatically clean up their floors). We have drones flying through the skies, and quadcopters that are on the verge of being autonomous.

In the medical field, people are on the verge of curing aids, undoing paralysis, restoring hearing and sight, and several other things.

We've got viable electric cars (the cars are viable, it's just the infrastructure to support them that's missing).

And then, we have dental technology, which has barely made any advancements for several decades. Off the top of my head, we went from amalgam fillings to UV cured composite fillings. We have hand held digital x-ray machines (though some of this advancement is the result of needing to x-ray parts on SMT lines). And they have ... invisalign. And, well, I'm hard pressed to think of any other major advancements in dental tech. They're still extracting teeth using clamps, they're still fixing cavities by drilling and filling. And it's still all expensive as hell.

It's one thing to say that tech area X hasn't advanced as much as tech area Y. But when tech area A, B, C, D, E, F, ... have all had significant advances you would expect SOME sort of major advancement in X every now and then.

What is it that makes dental tech so different from other techs that it's allowed to stagnate and hardly make any sort of advancement? All I'm saying is that the dental field seems more concerned with raping the consumer in the mouth than advancing their field.
 
2013-07-04 09:27:33 PM  
There are stories of ways to do this that required removing all the fillings first, and living a very plain life for a while. Too much work!

Lordargent, we have platinum posts to put into the bone for replacement teeth. If you have bone loss, they now have a technique to pack the area with powdered coral, allowng the bone to regrow.

The problem is that teeth live in a dirty area and get constant use. also, are one of the most sensitive, nerve packed items in the body.  It's not the easiest part of the body to work with.
 
2013-07-04 10:29:45 PM  

EngineerAU: Every time I floss, I can't help wondering why we're still pulling a string manually through our teeth when we have advanced our IT to such a state that we can tweet the state of bowel movements to the world. Something similar to a fluoride tray, placed on the teeth for ten seconds, would be the dental care of a high tech society.


The ADA has already made teeth whitening a "medical procedure" to force people to go to dentists for cosmetic treatments. Any major innovations that would happen in dental care would meet the same fate. We get brushes, floss and mouthwash, and anything else would meet legislative doom on the state level unless it could be solely available through dentists.
 
2013-07-04 10:33:31 PM  
AgonistAlex: Lordargent, we have platinum posts to put into the bone for replacement teeth. If you have bone loss, they now have a technique to pack the area with powdered coral, allowng the bone to regrow.

I'm actually about to get a pair of implants ... Ten years after a set of root canal's failed ... Ten years after an old filling in a retained baby tooth failed (and cracked an adjacent tooth in the process)
So basically, I've had 20 years of a single tooth causing the vast majority of my dental issues. Needless to say, I've been keeping an eye on dental technology in the hopes that something would come along to solve my woe.

As for the two advancements you mentioned.

1) Titanium dental implants were first used around 60 years ago, so it can hardly be counted as new technology.

2) Bone grafting in general dates back to 1906. Using coral as a substitute for bone goes back t0 the 70s. I'm not sure when it made its way to dental technology, but even so it's just a reapplication of an advancement that was made in the general medical field. It didn't exactly require huge leaps and mounds technologically speaking.

Yeah, the mouth is a dirty place, but their field specializes in just that one singular area of the body.

// I've been hearing about this tooth regrowth thing for at least a decade. Friggin produce something already :P
 
2013-07-04 10:34:56 PM  
// ugh ^ tablet like typing detected :P
 
2013-07-05 12:03:26 AM  
Scientific American had a really good article, July 05' Test Tube Teeth.  Seriously, it's a matter of time.
 
2013-07-05 10:59:40 AM  
This sounds like it regrows the tissue inside the tooth, but what about the enamel?  It always seems like such a huge evolutionary shortcoming to have teeth with a protective outer shell that can't regenerate itself.
 
2013-07-05 12:23:45 PM  
By the nature of how enamel is formed, regeneration of existing enamel would be very difficult.
 
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