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(TreeHugger)   236 years of Energy consumption in one graph: Main sources of energy in the U.S. since the first Independence Day (1776-2012). Did you know the country ran basically just on wood for the first 100 years?   (treehugger.com ) divider line
    More: Misc, Electric energy consumption, Main Source, Independence Days, U.S., Maine, U.S. Energy Information Administration, 4th of July, Asbury Park, renewable resources  
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4841 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Jul 2013 at 9:20 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-03 05:22:27 PM  
I remember getting an electric bill from National Grid where it broke down where they got their power from. It said 1% from wood.

I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-07-03 06:41:28 PM  
I want to see it scaled per capita.

In Massachusetts the government is trying to ban wood burning because of pollution. There are still wood boilers in the rural parts.

I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.

So that's why there's a .0013 per kWh charge for "answering annoying customer questions" on my bill.
 
2013-07-03 08:13:36 PM  
Is that dip at the end of "Nuclear" due to San Onofre?
 
2013-07-03 09:22:57 PM  
    My wife basically runs on wood.   About time to fuel her up.
 
2013-07-03 09:25:22 PM  
Well no shiat subby. When all you use energy for is heating your house and you're surrounded by trees wood will probably be your primary energy source.
 
2013-07-03 09:27:32 PM  
So why is Hydro not part of Renewable? Isn't it generally considered a renewable energy source?
 
2013-07-03 09:40:16 PM  

NewportBarGuy: I remember getting an electric bill from National Grid where it broke down where they got their power from. It said 1% from wood.

I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.


I have an ultrapower plant not 5 miles from my house. Yes, that's what they're called and no, I'm not kidding.

The power goes out of state.
 
2013-07-03 09:41:53 PM  

ZAZ: I want to see it scaled per capita.

In Massachusetts the government is trying to ban wood burning because of pollution. There are still wood boilers in the rural parts.

I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.

So that's why there's a .0013 per kWh charge for "answering annoying customer questions" on my bill.


Last time I looked, there was a $5 minimum fee for being a National Grid customer.  But it gets tacked on no matter how much you use.  I tried to ask them why they'd charge a $5 fee if I was using more than $5 of electricity and they just told me they were authorized to charge it, so shaddap.
 
2013-07-03 09:42:55 PM  
How much of it is dog power?

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-03 09:48:52 PM  
But, but ... SEE OH TWO KILLED MY FATHER!
 
2013-07-03 09:51:20 PM  

ZAZ: I want to see it scaled per capita.

In Massachusetts the government is trying to ban wood burning because of pollution. There are still wood boilers in the rural parts.

I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.

So that's why there's a .0013 per kWh charge for "answering annoying customer questions" on my bill.


Wait for just Commercial use or in general? Do you know how many farkin people in mass still use wood to heat their homes???
 
2013-07-03 09:53:13 PM  

NewportBarGuy: I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.


There is various "wood waste" (sawdust, sawmill scraps, chips from tree disposal) that has to be disposed of somehow, and burning it for power (or distilling burnable gas out of it) is a very old practice.

Another early energy source that should have been included on the graph, though, was animal power (horses, oxen, mules, etc.)
 
2013-07-03 09:54:33 PM  
Yes.  Yes I did.
 
2013-07-03 10:01:00 PM  
Did you know, subby, wood was pretty much the only power source for 1000s of years that met the demands of scale in industrial operation?
 
2013-07-03 10:02:53 PM  
I call shenanigans on that chart. Water wheels count as hydro, and they were the main source of power for various mills long before Watt patented his steam engine in 1781.
 
2013-07-03 10:03:35 PM  
subby's mom still runs on wood
 
2013-07-03 10:05:15 PM  

NewportBarGuy: I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.


You can burn wood pellets in a coal power plant. British Columbia has had large areas of forest killed by pine beetles and this is one of the ways they're using the dead trees.

/and where's whale oil on the chart? Do they count it as renewable?
 
2013-07-03 10:06:33 PM  

flondrix: NewportBarGuy: I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.

There is various "wood waste" (sawdust, sawmill scraps, chips from tree disposal) that has to be disposed of somehow, and burning it for power (or distilling burnable gas out of it) is a very old practice.

Another early energy source that should have been included on the graph, though, was animal power (horses, oxen, mules, etc.)


My highschool was heated using wood pellets. And yeah most of it was scrap that was pressed into pellets and burned.
 
2013-07-03 10:07:18 PM  
My parents' house has a wood-burning stove, but it's only for a single room that was built as an addition to the house.
 
2013-07-03 10:11:25 PM  

flondrix: Another early energy source that should have been included on the graph, though, was animal power (horses, oxen, mules, etc.)


I knew I should have waited to post.
 
2013-07-03 10:16:59 PM  

Ivo Shandor: NewportBarGuy: I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.

You can burn wood pellets in a coal power plant. British Columbia has had large areas of forest killed by pine beetles and this is one of the ways they're using the dead trees.

/and where's whale oil on the chart? Do they count it as renewable?


I had a REC power plant as a client a few years back that was blending walunt husks and shells with the coal. Apparently both have a decent BTU value, and were an abundant resource in the area that would otherwise go to waste. It was a pilot program, I changed jobs before it was complete so I have no idea how that all turned out.
 
2013-07-03 10:21:03 PM  

StRalphTheLiar: So why is Hydro not part of Renewable? Isn't it generally considered a renewable energy source?


Probably since it is fairly widely used and has been for a while now, it merits its own category.  Hydro was in use before "renewable energy" was a term.
 
2013-07-03 10:24:04 PM  

flondrix: NewportBarGuy: I had to call and ask where the f*ck they are getting wood power from. They had no answer.

There is various "wood waste" (sawdust, sawmill scraps, chips from tree disposal) that has to be disposed of somehow, and burning it for power (or distilling burnable gas out of it) is a very old practice.

Another early energy source that should have been included on the graph, though, was animal power (horses, oxen, mules, etc.)


ih0.redbubble.net

thumbs.dreamstime.com
 
2013-07-03 10:27:01 PM  

enry: Last time I looked, there was a $5 minimum fee for being a National Grid customer. But it gets tacked on no matter how much you use. I tried to ask them why they'd charge a $5 fee if I was using more than $5 of electricity and they just told me they were authorized to charge it, so shaddap.


I'm glad I'm not the only one getting raped. Bonus, I have electric heat. Hooray!

/Quoted $13,000 to bring a gas line down my street.
 
2013-07-03 10:28:43 PM  

flondrix: There is various "wood waste" (sawdust, sawmill scraps, chips from tree disposal) that has to be disposed of somehow, and burning it for power (or distilling burnable gas out of it) is a very old practice.

Another early energy source that should have been included on the graph, though, was animal power (horses, oxen, mules, etc.)


I really appreciate all the answers from everyone. I really had a WTF moment when I saw that.

No word on the whale oil. However, who can be against clean burning whale oil? Oh, the whales?
 
2013-07-03 10:32:08 PM  

NewportBarGuy: flondrix: There is various "wood waste" (sawdust, sawmill scraps, chips from tree disposal) that has to be disposed of somehow, and burning it for power (or distilling burnable gas out of it) is a very old practice.

Another early energy source that should have been included on the graph, though, was animal power (horses, oxen, mules, etc.)

I really appreciate all the answers from everyone. I really had a WTF moment when I saw that.

No word on the whale oil. However, who can be against clean burning whale oil? Oh, the whales?


encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2013-07-03 10:33:44 PM  

NewportBarGuy: enry: Last time I looked, there was a $5 minimum fee for being a National Grid customer. But it gets tacked on no matter how much you use. I tried to ask them why they'd charge a $5 fee if I was using more than $5 of electricity and they just told me they were authorized to charge it, so shaddap.

I'm glad I'm not the only one getting raped. Bonus, I have electric heat. Hooray!

/Quoted $13,000 to bring a gas line down my street.


Gas company does the same thing, natch.
 
2013-07-03 10:35:11 PM  

NewportBarGuy: flondrix: There is various "wood waste" (sawdust, sawmill scraps, chips from tree disposal) that has to be disposed of somehow, and burning it for power (or distilling burnable gas out of it) is a very old practice.

Another early energy source that should have been included on the graph, though, was animal power (horses, oxen, mules, etc.)

I really appreciate all the answers from everyone. I really had a WTF moment when I saw that.

No word on the whale oil. However, who can be against clean burning whale oil? Oh, the whales?


If there was only a way to combine whale power and something else..

No, wait, scratch that.
 
2013-07-03 10:47:49 PM  
I don't have it handy, but my favorite graph involved the total power available to the control of a single person.

Starts with hand power, hand tools, animal power, wind, etc, peaking at nuclear aircraft carriers. Extend that out to the real of sci-fi and you can include Geordi Laforge as the most powerful individual human.
 
2013-07-03 10:50:42 PM  

wildcardjack: Extend that out to the real of sci-fi and you can include Geordi Laforge as the most powerful individual human.


images2.wikia.nocookie.net

Disagrees
 
2013-07-03 10:57:22 PM  

wildcardjack: peaking at nuclear aircraft carriers.


Eh, what about that dude with a lighter under the Saturn V?
 
2013-07-03 10:59:27 PM  
So it was Minecraft, only with more tree punching?
 
2013-07-03 11:04:18 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: wildcardjack: peaking at nuclear aircraft carriers.

Eh, what about that dude with a lighter under the Saturn V?


Those aren't really controlled. Although they had the best performance rate they weren't really under control of a single person at the helm.
 
2013-07-03 11:24:39 PM  

wildcardjack: Those aren't really controlled. Although they had the best performance rate they weren't really under control of a single person at the helm.


Neither is the nuclear reactor of an aircraft carrier, I'd say...

And what do you mean, not controlled???

If some guy saying "go faster" is controlling a nuclear reactor, why is some guy saying "go" not controlling a rocket engine? Seems like splitting hairs to me.
 
2013-07-03 11:39:50 PM  
Yes, I knew this. So did all the other people who stayed awake for more than half their classes in school.
 
2013-07-03 11:40:54 PM  
My parent's home had a wood-burning stove and baseboard hot water heat... I think it's safe to say that it was powered by cheerios, lamb sammiches and my teenage wood splitting.
lots and lots of wood splitting...
 
2013-07-03 11:56:07 PM  
I'm oakay with this.
 
2013-07-04 12:11:02 AM  
It's good to see coal drop with natural gas taking over.  We have lots of coal, but even with modern "clean" power plants, it produces a lot of pollution.  The natural gas is not perfect, but it's a huge improvement over coal.  And we have virtually an unlimited supply of that stuff assuming we can continue with fraking.  Yes, fraking has it's downside, but you need to weight the reduced pollution of the natural gas with the dangers accompanying it before going "ZOMG!  Fraking is evil!"  If we don't frak, we don't have so much of that lovely natural gas and we have to switch back to coal so we can get electricity for important shiat, like posting cat videos.

My understanding is it's fairly easy to convert a coal plant to a natural gas plant and that is one of the reasons for the major shift.  But I heard that somewhat second handed so don't know how accurate it is.
 
2013-07-04 12:26:45 AM  
www.vegasnews.com

Also runs off wood.
 
2013-07-04 12:27:35 AM  
Heheheheheheheh...wood.

farm5.staticflickr.com

/couldn't resist
 
2013-07-04 01:15:41 AM  

StRalphTheLiar: So why is Hydro not part of Renewable? Isn't it generally considered a renewable energy source?


nah
they HATE hydro NOW .... because dams fark with the environment ...
lol
 
2013-07-04 01:17:07 AM  

StRalphTheLiar: So why is Hydro not part of Renewable? Isn't it generally considered a renewable energy source?


http://blogs.kqed.org/climatewatch/2012/06/20/is-hydroelectric-power -a -renewable-energy-source/

"Large" hydro (more than 30 MW) has pretty substantial negative impacts on the environment, so it has its own category
 
2013-07-04 01:55:26 AM  

NewportBarGuy: enry: Last time I looked, there was a $5 minimum fee for being a National Grid customer. But it gets tacked on no matter how much you use. I tried to ask them why they'd charge a $5 fee if I was using more than $5 of electricity and they just told me they were authorized to charge it, so shaddap.

I'm glad I'm not the only one getting raped. Bonus, I have electric heat. Hooray!

/Quoted $13,000 to bring a gas line down my street.


Have you looked into a heat pump? Ground source ones are going to put you back as far as that gas line but air source ones are not too bad, still have an efficiency of 200-300%, run off electricity and have a quite attractive payback period.
 
2013-07-04 03:10:25 AM  
 
2013-07-04 06:18:56 AM  

Hollie Maea: NewportBarGuy: enry: Last time I looked, there was a $5 minimum fee for being a National Grid customer. But it gets tacked on no matter how much you use. I tried to ask them why they'd charge a $5 fee if I was using more than $5 of electricity and they just told me they were authorized to charge it, so shaddap.

I'm glad I'm not the only one getting raped. Bonus, I have electric heat. Hooray!

/Quoted $13,000 to bring a gas line down my street.

Have you looked into a heat pump? Ground source ones are going to put you back as far as that gas line but air source ones are not too bad, still have an efficiency of 200-300%, run off electricity and have a quite attractive payback period.


WhatthefarkamIreading?.jpg
 
2013-07-04 07:56:37 AM  

Baryogenesis: Hollie Maea: NewportBarGuy: enry: Last time I looked, there was a $5 minimum fee for being a National Grid customer. But it gets tacked on no matter how much you use. I tried to ask them why they'd charge a $5 fee if I was using more than $5 of electricity and they just told me they were authorized to charge it, so shaddap.

I'm glad I'm not the only one getting raped. Bonus, I have electric heat. Hooray!

/Quoted $13,000 to bring a gas line down my street.

Have you looked into a heat pump? Ground source ones are going to put you back as far as that gas line but air source ones are not too bad, still have an efficiency of 200-300%, run off electricity and have a quite attractive payback period.

WhatthefarkamIreading?.jpg


That's coefficient of performance, not thermodynamic efficiency. Heat pumps can exceed an effective 100% (by quite a lot) because they're just transferring heat, not creating it. Ground source pumps take advantage of the massive thermal resistance of the earth compared to the very low thermal resistance of a house, which acts sort of like leverage, and their coefficients of performance can be absolutely enormous.
 
2013-07-04 09:02:39 AM  
I thought they burned hemp, man.
 
2013-07-04 09:31:14 AM  
Things on this topic that I've always been curious about, but not sure where to find the answer:

If you took the cost of a nuclear power plant and spent the same amount of money on solar panels, how much energy could you produce? (More or less than the nuclear plant) Take into account the total cost over the life of the plant and the panels, fuel costs, and fuel disposal costs.


What would be the cost to put a solar panel on every rooftop south of the 40th parallel? How much energy would be produced? (Would it be worth it?)

I'm thinking there is also a value in distributing energy production to rooftops so there isn't a single point of failure (or target for terrorists, if you want to think like that). Can we put a value on that?
 
2013-07-04 11:00:04 AM  
Quantum Apostrophe:
ih0.redbubble.netthumbs.dreamstime.com

Ah yes, the original power of industry.
 
2013-07-04 12:30:29 PM  

The All-Powerful Atheismo: wildcardjack: Extend that out to the real of sci-fi and you can include Geordi Laforge as the most powerful individual human.

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 500x375]

Disagrees


Best. Masturbation. Shot. Ever!
 
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