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(BBC)   Two more men possibly cured of HIV through bone marrow transplants. Good thing they're inexpensive, easy to get, and non-intrusive   ( bbc.co.uk) divider line
    More: Interesting, HIV, bone marrows, brain tissue, gene therapy, stem cells  
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1597 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Jul 2013 at 9:42 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-03 08:20:29 AM  
It's still progress.  Good stuff.
 
2013-07-03 08:29:55 AM  
You can do a marrow transplant on the cheap, subby. You just need a lot of pork bones and really strong suction.
 
2013-07-03 08:48:52 AM  
theskinnyonmyjeans.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-07-03 08:52:37 AM  
I think that's my fault. I was at a protest in the early 90s, and my placard said, "Cure AIDS Now!". I should have been more specific. I should have said, "Cure AIDS Now, and Make the Cure Cheap and Non-intrusive!".
Sorry.
 
2013-07-03 08:57:12 AM  
It's not even that it's expensive, hard to get and intrusive.

These bone marrow transplants are being done between a donor with a specific genetic mutation that makes the donor resistant or immune to HIV/AIDS and a recipient that is HIV positive.

The difficulty isn't just finding a donor that has the specific genetic mutation in question, which is incredibly rare. The difficulty is finding a donor with the specific genetic mutation that is also a bone marrow match for the recipient, which is a very difficult task. Right now, it's a good first step, but as it stands, the current procedure is not practical enough to work on a large scale.
 
2013-07-03 09:00:23 AM  
Which is cheaper, a lifetime of a antiviral drugs or a bone marrow transplant?
 
2013-07-03 09:00:32 AM  

nekom: It's still progress.  Good stuff.


Agreed. Progress in treating AIDS is a good thing. Even if this can't be used on a large scale, it could lead to something that will.
 
2013-07-03 09:02:54 AM  

Clent: Which is cheaper, a lifetime of a antiviral drugs or a bone marrow transplant?


I'm still holding out hope for the HIV vaccine, which has been in development for over a decade now.
 
2013-07-03 09:07:16 AM  
"Hey, we cured AIDS!"

"Yeah, but it's hard!"
 
2013-07-03 09:14:49 AM  
I think your best bet is still to not get AIDS in the first place.
 
2013-07-03 09:20:41 AM  

EvilEgg: I think your best bet is still to not get AIDS in the first place.


Definitely, and this is especially important in parts of Africa, where some local superstitions such as having sex with a virgin will cure/make you immune from it still exist.  Education and condoms are a great investment in more ways than one.
 
2013-07-03 09:28:29 AM  
I wonder if there might be any way to develop a protocol for autologous transplants. That would be very safe, and a lot less difficult. Not cheap, but worth it if they could get it to work.
 
2013-07-03 09:47:13 AM  
That's fantastic but I'm always cynical about these sort of medical news headlines.  I remember back when Interferon was supposed to take care of this whole cancer nonsense.
 
2013-07-03 09:56:42 AM  
A step in the right direction for sure, but as my esteemed medical colleagues above noted; it's too experimental and too soon to get excited about it.
For the time being, I might suggest using a condom or abstinence, which are I believe your best two bets, and since this is Fark, I'm guessing you'll go with the latter.
By choice, of course.
 
2013-07-03 10:03:52 AM  

nekom: EvilEgg: I think your best bet is still to not get AIDS in the first place.

Definitely, and this is especially important in parts of Africa, where some local superstitions such as having sex with a virgin will cure/make you immune from it still exist.  Education and condoms are a great investment in more ways than one.


Hey! If having a virgin will cure/make me immune to AIDS is wrong, then I don't want to be right!
/Now where can I behead an albino, so I can use his head for making spells?
 
2013-07-03 10:04:17 AM  
Sorry sir, we'll try and make CURING YOUR HIV more convenient for you. Check back soon.
 
2013-07-03 10:05:45 AM  

RexTalionis: It's not even that it's expensive, hard to get and intrusive.

These bone marrow transplants are being done between a donor with a specific genetic mutation that makes the donor resistant or immune to HIV/AIDS and a recipient that is HIV positive.

The difficulty isn't just finding a donor that has the specific genetic mutation in question, which is incredibly rare. The difficulty is finding a donor with the specific genetic mutation that is also a bone marrow match for the recipient, which is a very difficult task. Right now, it's a good first step, but as it stands, the current procedure is not practical enough to work on a large scale.


According to the article, these were both regular bone marrow donors, with no known resistance. So this is a second step, if regular bone marrow can help cure HIV.
 
2013-07-03 10:07:34 AM  

RexTalionis: It's not even that it's expensive, hard to get and intrusive.

These bone marrow transplants are being done between a donor with a specific genetic mutation that makes the donor resistant or immune to HIV/AIDS and a recipient that is HIV positive.

The difficulty isn't just finding a donor that has the specific genetic mutation in question, which is incredibly rare. The difficulty is finding a donor with the specific genetic mutation that is also a bone marrow match for the recipient, which is a very difficult task. Right now, it's a good first step, but as it stands, the current procedure is not practical enough to work on a large scale.


How rare? I thought that 10% of Europeans were immune to HIV in part do to the similar resistance to plaque, and the plaque wiping out the non-resistant. Or is it a different mutation?
 
2013-07-03 10:19:39 AM  

Clent: Which is cheaper, a lifetime of a antiviral drugs or a bone marrow transplant?


Or a condom?

/just sayin'...they aren't all kids who got a duff transfusion.
//I live really, really far downtown.
 
2013-07-03 10:21:47 AM  

nekom: EvilEgg: I think your best bet is still to not get AIDS in the first place.

Definitely, and this is especially important in parts of Africa, where some local superstitions such as having sex with a virgin will cure/make you immune from it still exist.  Education and condoms are a great investment in more ways than one.


So is social policy that doesn't see the answer to the absence of pensions as "have eight kids, of which three or four will survive and maybe one will wipe my sorry ass if I actually live to retirement age."
 
2013-07-03 10:23:56 AM  
Much like the HPV vaccine, if we try to eliminate disease, it will only encourage sexual deviancy.
 
2013-07-03 10:24:37 AM  

Lt_Ryan: RexTalionis: It's not even that it's expensive, hard to get and intrusive.

These bone marrow transplants are being done between a donor with a specific genetic mutation that makes the donor resistant or immune to HIV/AIDS and a recipient that is HIV positive.

The difficulty isn't just finding a donor that has the specific genetic mutation in question, which is incredibly rare. The difficulty is finding a donor with the specific genetic mutation that is also a bone marrow match for the recipient, which is a very difficult task. Right now, it's a good first step, but as it stands, the current procedure is not practical enough to work on a large scale.

How rare? I thought that 10% of Europeans were immune to HIV in part do to the similar resistance to plaque, and the plaque wiping out the non-resistant. Or is it a different mutation?


here you go
 
2013-07-03 10:27:55 AM  

Lt_Ryan: RexTalionis: It's not even that it's expensive, hard to get and intrusive.

These bone marrow transplants are being done between a donor with a specific genetic mutation that makes the donor resistant or immune to HIV/AIDS and a recipient that is HIV positive.

The difficulty isn't just finding a donor that has the specific genetic mutation in question, which is incredibly rare. The difficulty is finding a donor with the specific genetic mutation that is also a bone marrow match for the recipient, which is a very difficult task. Right now, it's a good first step, but as it stands, the current procedure is not practical enough to work on a large scale.

How rare? I thought that 10% of Europeans were immune to HIV in part do to the similar resistance to plaque, and the plaque wiping out the non-resistant. Or is it a different mutation?


HIV is a monster - even some of the resistant people (including that famous hooker) have since caught it.  Those people are just resistant to certain strains of the virus.
 
2013-07-03 10:28:38 AM  
Still no cure for cancer.
 
2013-07-03 10:29:34 AM  

nekom: EvilEgg: I think your best bet is still to not get AIDS in the first place.

Definitely, and this is especially important in parts of Africa, where some local superstitions such as having sex with a virgin will cure/make you immune from it still exist.  Education and condoms are a great investment in more ways than one.


It is a massive shame that there are large scale misinformation campaigns in third-world countries thst spread those dangerous lies in the name of either their own snake oil or religious convictions. And it's even more disturbing that industrialized countries let these charlatans get away with it as much as they have.
 
2013-07-03 10:33:42 AM  

xanadian: Still no cure for cancer.


A cure for cancer is, essentially, a cure for human genetics in general.  Cancer is basically a state where human cells mutate in a way that, for varying reasons, they ignore their self-destruct programming & then multiply exponentially, essentially becoming a new species living inside a host organism.  To "cure" cancer would be to essentially have mastered human microbiology & biochemistry to a degree in which we can engineer ourselves to whatever specification we desire.
 
2013-07-03 10:38:22 AM  

Clent: Which is cheaper, a lifetime of a antiviral drugs or a bone marrow transplant?


I've heard (I treat cancer for a living) that bone marrow transplants can easily be $1 million, depending on the cancer and method of treatment.
 
2013-07-03 10:41:58 AM  

Lt_Ryan: How rare? I thought that 10% of Europeans were immune to HIV in part do to the similar resistance to plaque, and the plaque wiping out the non-resistant. Or is it a different mutation?


Is that why British people don't feel the need to brush their teeth?
 
2013-07-03 10:49:57 AM  

stuhayes2010: Clent: Which is cheaper, a lifetime of a antiviral drugs or a bone marrow transplant?

I've heard (I treat cancer for a living) that bone marrow transplants can easily be $1 million, depending on the cancer and method of treatment.


And yet my uncle, who had a bone marrow transplant to treat leukemia, thinks Obamacare needs repealed, and that Michelle Bachmann is sane.

I just don't understand some people.
 
2013-07-03 10:54:25 AM  

nekom: It's still progress.  Good stuff.


This. A cure is a cure. It's something we didn't have 10 years ago, and offers us a jumping-off point for less expensive procedures. Given the nature of HIV/AIDS and the fact that it can spread at an exponential rate, treating one person can prevent the disease from reaching multiple other individuals.
 
2013-07-03 11:10:51 AM  
This is just one small reason why people should be appreciative of the society they live in. It is amazing that this is even possible. Instead everyone wants to live in their home as an island, refuse taxation, and complain about lack of [insert topic here]. While we verge on a downward spiral other countries will take up the mantle of innovation and we'll be the ones looking longingly over the fence at the services and miracles we wish we had access to.
 
2013-07-03 11:14:12 AM  

nekom: ...., where some local superstitions such as having sex with a virgin will cure/make you immune from it still exist.


I know some folks who would volunteer in a deflowing campaign in order to protect the young women of the Continent from being the victims of HIV Cure Rape. Anyone want to help me write a grant proposal to the B&M Gates Foundation?
 
2013-07-03 11:19:51 AM  

BHShaman: nekom: ...., where some local superstitions such as having sex with a virgin will cure/make you immune from it still exist.

I know some folks who would volunteer in a deflowing campaign in order to protect the young women of the Continent from being the victims of HIV Cure Rape. Anyone want to help me write a grant proposal to the B&M Gates Foundation?


Those girls are a little... too... young there, man.
 
2013-07-03 11:42:49 AM  
I'm sure people with HIV give a flying f*ck about the non-intrusiveness of the procedure.
 
2013-07-03 11:48:48 AM  

RexTalionis: It's not even that it's expensive, hard to get and intrusive.

These bone marrow transplants are being done between a donor with a specific genetic mutation that makes the donor resistant or immune to HIV/AIDS and a recipient that is HIV positive.

The difficulty isn't just finding a donor that has the specific genetic mutation in question, which is incredibly rare. The difficulty is finding a donor with the specific genetic mutation that is also a bone marrow match for the recipient, which is a very difficult task. Right now, it's a good first step, but as it stands, the current procedure is not practical enough to work on a large scale.


Do you know if they test bone marrow registries for that genetic mutation? I'm on the list as a donor, have never been called, but don't know exactly what it is they consider me for.
 
2013-07-03 11:56:34 AM  
You're looking at trying to find a match of 1% of the 1%. Not practical.As M. Brooks once wrote, no one would get the cure unless they thought they were infected....but a vaccine! Well, now me and my kids are safe!I still wonder how many parents got their kids the HPV vaccine without telling them what it was for.
 
2013-07-03 12:00:59 PM  
Good thing they're inexpensive, easy to get, and non-intrusive

I know, right?  Ain't nobody got time for that.  I'll stick with the AIDS, thanks.
 
2013-07-03 01:05:07 PM  

SilentStrider: And yet my uncle, who had a bone marrow transplant to treat leukemia, thinks Obamacare needs repealed, and that Michelle Bachmann is sane.

I just don't understand some people.


Did you mean saint?

I don't understand some people either.

Methinks Michelle Bachman has an insane.
 
2013-07-03 01:55:00 PM  
i.qkme.me

I'm sorry.
 
2013-07-03 02:12:12 PM  
What do we want?
        A cure for AIDS!
When do we want it?
        As soon as they're inexpensive, easy to get, and non-intrusive!
 
2013-07-03 03:23:13 PM  

Marine1: nekom: It's still progress.  Good stuff.

This. A cure is a cure. It's something we didn't have 10 years ago, and offers us a jumping-off point for less expensive procedures. Given the nature of HIV/AIDS and the fact that it can spread at an exponential rate, treating one person can prevent the disease from reaching multiple other individuals.


Is it possible to grow bone marrow in a lab?  Don't we have tissue samples from a single donor that have been kept alive for research since the '50s?  Sure, implanting the marrow will always be painful but at least you wouldn't have to rely on live donors willing to endure the pain for charity.
 
2013-07-03 03:46:42 PM  

steve_wmn: Marine1: nekom: It's still progress.  Good stuff.

This. A cure is a cure. It's something we didn't have 10 years ago, and offers us a jumping-off point for less expensive procedures. Given the nature of HIV/AIDS and the fact that it can spread at an exponential rate, treating one person can prevent the disease from reaching multiple other individuals.

Is it possible to grow bone marrow in a lab?  Don't we have tissue samples from a single donor that have been kept alive for research since the '50s?  Sure, implanting the marrow will always be painful but at least you wouldn't have to rely on live donors willing to endure the pain for charity.


This isn't yet a cure.  This is *potentially* a cure.

Also, bone marrow transplants can easily kill you.
 
2013-07-03 04:56:27 PM  
2/3 ain't bad, subby.  Gay men are inexpensive and easy to get, but they're definitely not non-intrusive.
 
2013-07-03 05:27:05 PM  

Lexx: xanadian: Still no cure for cancer.

A cure for cancer is, essentially, a cure for human genetics in general.  Cancer is basically a state where human cells mutate in a way that, for varying reasons, they ignore their self-destruct programming & then multiply exponentially, essentially becoming a new species living inside a host organism.  To "cure" cancer would be to essentially have mastered human microbiology & biochemistry to a degree in which we can engineer ourselves to whatever specification we desire.


And I'll add, cancer cells learn to use your body's metabolism against it, learning to thrive in conditions and on substrates (food, building blocks) using pathways normal cells don't use.  Each cancer is different in this regard, and in the ways Lexx mentioned, and even different metastases in the same individual can behave very differently.
 
2013-07-03 07:13:32 PM  

Honest Bender: Good thing they're inexpensive, easy to get, and non-intrusive

I know, right?  Ain't nobody got time for that.  I'll stick with the AIDS, thanks.


So will I, considering BMTs are:
- Sometimes fatal
- Hard to find a donor for
- Unbelievably expensive
- A really shiatty process in general

And modern ARV therapy, while obnoxiously pricey, allows people with HIV that start treatment within a reasonable window of time to live a normal AIDS-free life in the vast majority of cases.
 
2013-07-03 08:42:32 PM  

James!: "Hey, we cured AIDS!"

"Yeah, but it's hard!"


And it kills one in five people.

Google Graft Vs Host disorder.
 
2013-07-04 08:39:25 AM  
Causes AIDS: getting filled with boners

Cures AIDS: getting bone filler
 
2013-07-04 08:42:14 AM  

SilentStrider: stuhayes2010: Clent: Which is cheaper, a lifetime of a antiviral drugs or a bone marrow transplant?

I've heard (I treat cancer for a living) that bone marrow transplants can easily be $1 million, depending on the cancer and method of treatment.

And yet my uncle, who had a bone marrow transplant to treat leukemia, thinks Obamacare needs repealed, and that Michelle Bachmann is sane.

I just don't understand some people.


Sounds like he needs a brain transplant as well.
 
2013-07-04 10:42:22 AM  

steve_wmn: Is it possible to grow bone marrow in a lab? Don't we have tissue samples from a single donor that have been kept alive for research since the '50s? Sure, implanting the marrow will always be painful but at least you wouldn't have to rely on live donors willing to endure the pain for charity.


Yeah, we have tissue samples from the 50's--but you most certainly don't want them.  They're cancer samples!

joemax: So will I, considering BMTs are:
- Sometimes fatal
- Hard to find a donor for
- Unbelievably expensive
- A really shiatty process in general


Yeah, at the current state of the art I think it's a case of the cure being worse than the disease.
 
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