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(Network World)   FARK joins civil rights groups and other major websites in the July 4 protest against NSA surveillance   (networkworld.com) divider line 79
    More: Spiffy, NSA, civil rights groups, Fourth Amendment, IDG, freedom of the press, NSA surveillance, civil rights, John Cusack  
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5814 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jul 2013 at 2:42 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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Archived thread
2013-07-03 02:21:07 AM
10 votes:
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
2013-07-03 02:45:37 AM
8 votes:
I'd be curious to know how many people join/joined these protests because of what other people told them.  This shiat is entirely blown out of proportion and a number of folks are utilizing common fears to make their appeals.
2013-07-03 03:12:12 AM
7 votes:

DeathByGeekSquad: I'd be curious to know how many people join/joined these protests because of what other people told them.


That and people who are just plain clueless.  The idea that someone is reading your email is just silly.  There are an estimated 89 billion emails per day sent.  Projected to be over 100 billion per day by next year.  And that, btw, is just a tiny fraction of all internet traffic. No one is reading your email (probably not even your intended recipient), no  one is watching you download porn.  You aren't that special.  This is THE biggest clueless outrage over very little in a while.
2013-07-03 02:25:37 AM
6 votes:
Good. It's gone way too far. We've done a lot of stupid shiat because 9/11 caught us with our pants down, but we passed enough is enough long ago, we're America dammit.
2013-07-03 04:10:32 AM
4 votes:

BullBearMS: pkjun: RoyBatty: If the Republicans in power weren't as corrupt as the Democrats in power, they would try and pin Obama to the wall for the next four years with the NSA scandal.

Or, you know, if President Bush hadn't created PRISM with the explicit approval of the Republican Congress, or if they hadn't opposed the few insignificant reforms he had imposed on the program. They aren't "pinning Obama to the wall on this" because they support it just as much as he does, and because any opposition coming from the Republicans in Congress would end up being just as insincere and incoherent as Romney's opposition to Obamacare was.

The only difference between the Republican leadership and the Democratic leadership on this issue, is that the Republicans didn't spend years lying to America and pretending to oppose it like the Democrats did.


Um, yes, that is my point precisely. The Republicans are not making political hay on this because they have an even stronger record of support for this program than the Democrats do.

As for Obama? To the best of my knowledge, he didn't lie about his stance on it. He did exactly what he said he would do--require FISA warrants--and not one thing more. If you thought he was going to be a dove or a civil libertarian, that's kind of your fault. He never gave any indication of being so.

I guess I'm in the "complete apathy" camp regarding this. We've known about NSA wiretaps since 2006. Obama never gave me any reason to believe he would stop it. And I think it's telling that, for the most part, the sites that are protesting this are the sites that are most heavily trafficked by people who were too young to pay attention to politics seven years ago when this story broke.
2013-07-03 03:33:55 AM
4 votes:
America -a mildly decent country that hasn't topped a single quality of life index even way before 9/11. I think you guys should protest against corporate interests - your government is their boy toy. You're not America dammit, you're just America. A country that was way up in incarceration rates, the largest gun industry in the world, and awful healthcare and social policies, again, before 9/11. You guys (or parents) elected Reagan, in landslides, twice. For farks sake, neuter your middle man industries and lobbiests - it's a clear vote of non confidence (on your own fellow citizens even) if you think they can't make money and drive the economy without relying on unilateral trade warfare.

Or you can continue to blame the empire lite decline on immigration and government largess. Your call.
2013-07-03 03:03:35 AM
4 votes:
Oh look. A virtual protest. Because that's going to change anything.

This isn't standing up against legislation like SOPA. This is a fait accompli.It's already done.

The war is over, and freedom lost. The only option to restore it- TRULY restore it- is not an option Americans can stomach.

The American experiment, for all intents and purposes, is over. Now we enter the decline of empire. Enjoy it. Decadence does have its benefits.
2013-07-03 05:00:43 AM
3 votes:

Metal: Wangiss: What is the smallest constitutional breach that could rouse you to action?  Do they have to start quartering soldiers in your house?

There is none, and they may. Breaches happen, voting responds.

You didn't answer my questions. Where was your action in the last 10 years?  Why now if not then?


When I got back from Japan ten years ago, I was disoriented and surprised.  People were eating hamburgers wrapped in lettuce, hating on France, and listening to screamo.  None of these things existed two years prior when I landed at Narita, wondering what the US would do about a vague threat.

I was playing Deus Ex on 9.10.01 and I thought I was dreaming when my brother woke me up around 8am on the West Coast to what could have been a sequel.  Terrorists?  New York?  Sleepy.  Goodnight, Dave.

My political views weren't fully formed yet.  I thought I was a Republican, but at the time I was a minarchist who projected his values on others unwittingly.  I took for granted that working together under smaller government would work better than it does in real life; I hoped for cooperation.  Now I'm not a minarchist so much as a voluntaryist, but not in an anarcho-capitalist way.  My core belief is in self-rule.  Republics are an attempt at self-rule geared for a people who share a set of ideals they believe can be respected by a ruling class they appoint.  Democracies are an attempt at self-rule for a people who know their differences will, at times, be insurmountable and are willing to make good-faith compromise an ingrained principle of governance.  But even though our constitutional republic with democratic underpinnings is based principally on self-rule, the last thing people want everyone to do is make their own decisions.  Some very influential people want to rule, and enough people don't want to make their own decisions that those who like power can foist preposterous laws on us like those regarding soda size, and whether or not you can see your friends and family in the hospital.  When I found out Bush had enacted the Patriot Act, NCLB, and a handful of other federal overreaches, I left the Republican Party officially.  That may not seem like activism to you, but it was complicated for me and forced me to examine my principles and start from scratch.  It was actually rather Heidegger (okay, early Heidegger).

I'm still delving into what makes this all tick, myself, and I'm sure that in this huge figuring out of my own philosophy and priorities I'm missing some things.  In 2006 I wasn't sure what-all was going on.  I was a newlywed and my wife and I had just endured a miscarriage with its attendant depression (I was Santa--a depressed Santa--it could be a comedy sketch, but it was too sad).  Life is big, and I wish I could fight every injustice, but I'm very often distracted with the all-singing, all-dancing crap of life.

If all you wanted was to verify that partisan hacks existed, get your abundantly available self-satisfaction elsewhere.  Else why are you even asking that question?  What if I just didn't give a fark because I didn't understand, and now increased media attention has forced me to confront the issue?  That's probably 90% of "why now," but is that a bad thing?  People should always fight for their rights.  If you can keep them interested longer than Drew Curtis can, I say go for it.
2013-07-03 04:50:06 AM
3 votes:
Oh, and it's worth reminding everyone that July 4th isn't 'Murrica: F*ck Yeah! Day.

It's Independence Day.

Please remember why that's a virtue, not just as a nation (ideally) beholden to no other, but why independence is a virtue of *individuals*.

Maybe a little reflection on that might help those who shrug their shoulders at unlimited, unchecked government power understand why that's a bad thing.
2013-07-03 04:31:56 AM
3 votes:

ThrobblefootSpectre: DeathByGeekSquad: I'd be curious to know how many people join/joined these protests because of what other people told them.

That and people who are just plain clueless.  The idea that someone is reading your email is just silly.  There are an estimated 89 billion emails per day sent.  Projected to be over 100 billion per day by next year.  And that, btw, is just a tiny fraction of all internet traffic. No one is reading your email (probably not even your intended recipient), no  one is watching you download porn.  You aren't that special.  This is THE biggest clueless outrage over very little in a while.


Are you really so naive? They certainly cannot read every single email sent, but they can certainly do filtering, sentiment analysis, key word tracking, etc.. on your emails. As soon as you are flagged, the certainly then can start watching your emails.

This is a perfect example of a rather innocuous misunderstanding, leading to two kids being denied entry to the US for no legitimate reason

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/london/think-before-you-tweet-why-two-teen ag ers-were-refused-entry-to-the-u-s/2802
2013-07-03 04:03:27 AM
3 votes:

RoyBatty: If the Republicans in power weren't as corrupt as the Democrats in power, they would try and pin Obama to the wall for the next four years with the NSA scandal.

Presumably a pro gun rights party, because guns are needed to overthrow a tyrannical government, should be strong on the 4th amendment, 5th amendment and against government spying on its citizens (except of course in the bedroom because sodomy).

And unlike Benghazi, they would probably get a lot of support for that.


Fap fap fap Obama continues Bush's programs
Fap fap fap my guns will take down a tyrannous government that I have to oay taxes to
Fap fap fap liberals love sodomy
Fap fap fap BENGHAZI1!!!!!! 1!!! 11! 1! 1!
2013-07-03 03:41:31 AM
3 votes:

RoyBatty: If the Republicans in power weren't as corrupt as the Democrats in power, they would try and pin Obama to the wall for the next four years with the NSA scandal.


Or, you know, if President Bush hadn't created PRISM with the explicit approval of the Republican Congress, or if they hadn't opposed the few insignificant reforms he had imposed on the program. They aren't "pinning Obama to the wall on this" because they support it just as much as he does, and because any opposition coming from the Republicans in Congress would end up being just as insincere and incoherent as Romney's opposition to Obamacare was.
2013-07-03 03:41:24 AM
3 votes:
Why should anyone be worried that our government is spying on it's own citizens and only a federal judge's ruling has halted their ability to throw people into military prisons without charges or a trial???

dl.dropboxusercontent.com
2013-07-03 03:32:17 AM
3 votes:
So, what's Fark's contribution here gonna be... Ditch the tracking cookies and cross-site scripting?
2013-07-03 03:13:50 AM
3 votes:
Can someone explain to me how what NSA is doing is more invasive than what we willingly surrender to Google all day long?
2013-07-03 03:10:33 AM
3 votes:
libranoelrose: RoyBatty: If the Republicans in power weren't as corrupt as the Democrats in power, they would try and pin Obama to the wall for the next four years with the NSA scandal.

Presumably a pro gun rights party, because guns are needed to overthrow a tyrannical government, should be strong on the 4th amendment, 5th amendment and against government spying on its citizens (except of course in the bedroom because sodomy).

And unlike Benghazi, they would probably get a lot of support for that.

Since when did you start making sense?


No worries, I am sure you will find things to disagree with tomorrow.

Also, this has taken too long to get everyone worked up.

Now that they've been doing it this long they will never give up the power.


I think this is true which is why protests like these need to have bodies in front of the White House and Congressional offices, not just banners on websites.
2013-07-03 02:50:28 AM
3 votes:
That's nice, but where was this level of outcry in 2006 when the story was first reported?
2013-07-03 02:50:05 AM
3 votes:
LOL.
What is a protest going to do?
Are you going to beg the gov't to turn in their equipment and hope that cleans it up?
The skidmarks are way deep in the Underoos, folks.
2013-07-03 05:01:50 AM
2 votes:

sendtodave: pkjun: And I think it's telling that, for the most part, the sites that are protesting this are the sites that are most heavily trafficked by people who were too young to pay attention to politics seven years ago when this story broke.

Or perhaps the ones more likely to be party van'd!  Silly 4chan pedos and anarchists.

So, we've got criminals, people too young to understand why this is OK, people too old to understand why this is OK, people too naive to understand why this is OK, people too ignorant to understand why this is OK, traitors country, foreigners, and the ACLU.

Hm, any other ways we can slander opposition to government overreach in the name of "Meh, who cares?"


That's a hell of a a Strawman Flotilla to launch in response to the observation that this particular protest against seven-year-old news is shouldered by youth-oriented meme aggregators.
2013-07-03 04:49:15 AM
2 votes:

ghostwind: This is a perfect example of a rather innocuous misunderstanding, leading to two kids being denied entry to the US for no legitimate reason

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/london/think-before-you-tweet-why-two-teen ag ers-were-refused-entry-to-the-u-s/2802


BTW, you may want to find a better example if you want to register higher than a 0.00 on the outrage meter.  For one thing tweets are public information that anyone can see.  And secondly, there is no "right" for non-citizens to enter the U.S.  All in all that wasn't quite enough to convince me of the pervasive "this is the end of freedom, we are all doomed" attitude.

/P.S. the guy at your next job interview will be reading your tweets also.
2013-07-03 04:29:11 AM
2 votes:

pkjun: If you thought he was going to be a dove or a civil libertarian, that's kind of your fault. He never gave any indication of being so.


Holy shiat. How did I miss this total lie?

Obama never claimed he was a Constitutional Scholar who would restore the rule of law after years of lawless Bush behavior???
2013-07-03 04:00:15 AM
2 votes:
in related news, Fark still censors the fark out of the Internet.
2013-07-03 03:57:21 AM
2 votes:

howdoibegin: America -a mildly decent country that hasn't topped a single quality of life index even way before 9/11. I think you guys should protest against corporate interests - your government is their boy toy. You're not America dammit, you're just America. A country that was way up in incarceration rates, the largest gun industry in the world, and awful healthcare and social policies, again, before 9/11. You guys (or parents) elected Reagan, in landslides, twice. For farks sake, neuter your middle man industries and lobbiests - it's a clear vote of non confidence (on your own fellow citizens even) if you think they can't make money and drive the economy without relying on unilateral trade warfare.

Or you can continue to blame the empire lite decline on immigration and government largess. Your call.


America is a big country with lots of people who are not getting (or wanting) all the information before they elect someone... we end up with a lot of political beauty queens who suddenly have to make economic decisions worth Trillions of dollars... but what they really know about is the right stance on abortion.
2013-07-03 03:52:36 AM
2 votes:
Reddit? Wordpress? Cheezburger? 4chan? Fark?

Holy shiat, this is serious. The NSA is surely going to be quaking in its boots here. I mean, that's like five different aggregators of low-attention-span content, right there. Everyone knows that the opinion-leaders who are most likely to lead a technological revolution are the people who are also most disinclined to read anything more labor-intensive than an image macro.
2013-07-03 03:49:55 AM
2 votes:

pkjun: RoyBatty: If the Republicans in power weren't as corrupt as the Democrats in power, they would try and pin Obama to the wall for the next four years with the NSA scandal.

Or, you know, if President Bush hadn't created PRISM with the explicit approval of the Republican Congress, or if they hadn't opposed the few insignificant reforms he had imposed on the program. They aren't "pinning Obama to the wall on this" because they support it just as much as he does, and because any opposition coming from the Republicans in Congress would end up being just as insincere and incoherent as Romney's opposition to Obamacare was.


The only difference between the Republican leadership and the Democratic leadership on this issue, is that the Republicans didn't spend years lying to America and pretending to oppose it like the Democrats did.
2013-07-03 03:19:18 AM
2 votes:

bluorangefyre: That's nice, but where was this level of outcry in 2006 when the story was first reported?


I followed this pretty closely at the time, and then it didn't provoke this kind of reaction. All it did was turn a blatantly illegal warrentless wiretapping program into a rubberstamped-by-FISA every three months program that has at least some oversight. Even if it's legal--and I'll leave that answer to Constitutional experts--it violates the spirit of the 4th Amendment.
2013-07-03 03:16:20 AM
2 votes:
Thanks, Drew.

This is an issue that has polarized users and it would be simpler for you to just sit back and not take a position which potentially risks some TF revenue.
2013-07-03 03:13:57 AM
2 votes:

ThrobblefootSpectre: DeathByGeekSquad: I'd be curious to know how many people join/joined these protests because of what other people told them.

That and people who are just plain clueless.  The idea that someone is reading your email is just silly.  There are an estimated 89 billion emails per day sent.  Projected to be over 100 billion per day by next year.  And that, btw, is just a tiny fraction of all internet traffic. No one is reading your email (probably not even your intended recipient), no  one is watching you download porn.  You aren't that special.  This is THE biggest clueless outrage over very little in a while.


The issue is not that they ARE. It is that they CAN.

You don't understand your rights enough to miss them, or really even notice they're gone.
2013-07-03 03:13:31 AM
2 votes:
Websites participating include Reddit, where Restore the Fourth originated, WordPress, 4chan, Mozilla, Fark and Cheezburger.com.

Well clearly, the Department of Defense shall take note of such an august assemblage of titans of industry. DNI Clapper never does anything without seeking advice from 4chan pedos and photos of cats with intentionally misspelled captions.
2013-07-03 03:12:32 AM
2 votes:

RoyBatty: I think this is true which is why protests like these need to have bodies in front of the White House and Congressional offices, not just banners on websites


You could get half a million people on the National Mall and it'd mean exactly two things- jack and shiat.
2013-07-03 03:04:13 AM
2 votes:
www.faithvillage.com
2013-07-03 02:53:38 AM
2 votes:
If the Republicans in power weren't as corrupt as the Democrats in power, they would try and pin Obama to the wall for the next four years with the NSA scandal.

Presumably a pro gun rights party, because guns are needed to overthrow a tyrannical government, should be strong on the 4th amendment, 5th amendment and against government spying on its citizens (except of course in the bedroom because sodomy).

And unlike Benghazi, they would probably get a lot of support for that.
2013-07-03 02:53:18 AM
2 votes:
Oh yeah, this will make the NSA change their ways!
2013-07-03 02:50:55 AM
2 votes:

AverageAmericanGuy: Mozilla is a major website?


Firefox is one of the top three web browsers, so yes.
2013-07-03 02:50:04 AM
2 votes:
Cheezburger? Seriously?
So they'll see what 4chan does and try to monetize it? fark those assholes
2013-07-03 02:45:35 AM
2 votes:
We do?
2013-07-03 02:14:57 AM
2 votes:
While this is good,  I wish there had been planned protests in front of the White House demanding Obama's action.
2013-07-03 02:11:43 AM
2 votes:

Confabulat: Fun!

i just wish someone cared enough to spy on me.


Seriously

/we should proclaim it "Bore a NSA agent to suicide day"
//I could easily take out 3 or 4
2013-07-03 03:41:27 PM
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: Are we going to burn a flag?

Oh, that's what I do to celebrate my right to free speech.

What do you do to celebrate your right to be free from unreasonable warrants?


Canada day was a few days ago.
2013-07-03 11:11:15 AM
1 votes:
Dear NSA: "No, You move."

www.droidforums.net
2013-07-03 10:57:41 AM
1 votes:

Science_Guy_3.14159: I don't understand, so giving your personal info to facebook is perfectly fine. facebook in turn selling this info to companies and individuals is fine but the government asking facebook for this info that is available to both private individuals and corporations around the world is wrong? Individuals and Corporations have probably done a lot more harm with personal info then the government ever has.


Think of it this way.  The Constitution limits the government.  Not private businesses.  So, you can't be jailed for saying black licorice is the best licorice.  But you can be fired for saying that.
2013-07-03 10:39:43 AM
1 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.


Nice!  Did you write that?
2013-07-03 10:39:07 AM
1 votes:

Science_Guy_3.14159: The Bill of Rights was written by the same founding fathers that took all these rights away from loyalists during the revolution. If this was some vigilante gathering all this info, filtering through it and stopping terrorists I would be willing to bet people would call him a hero. I do not think the NSA is the right group to blame, they are simply using the tools and resources available to best get the job done. I think the blame kinda needs to be shifted to facebook, google, verizon, etc. these companies collect and sell your info ALL the time, facebook in particular is quite bad.


"Hey, Facebook, I'll trade some of my personal info for a free social networking experience."
"Okay, user."

That's voluntary.

"Hey, government, stop spying on me."
"No."

That's involuntary.

When someone walks on the pavers in your front yard, they're not hurting anything, but if it's not voluntary on your part they are trespassing.  I believe you should be allowed to govern your own property as long as you're not doing anything illegal.

When someone talks to you about personal matters, they're not hurting anything, but if it's not voluntary on your part, it's interrogation.  I believe you should be allowed to govern your own personal information as long as you're not doing anything illegal.

When you tell people where you are and what you're doing, that doesn't harm you, but if it's not voluntary it's stalking.  I believe you should be allowed to go about your business without being followed as long as you're not doing anything illegal.

Probable cause is the threshold for the federal government to take action.  Once they have a defensible reason to believe you're involved in a FEDERAL CRIME, you suddenly exist to them.  Until then, you should be merely a census statistic and a social security account.

"A watched man is not a free man."
2013-07-03 09:59:40 AM
1 votes:

Zulu_as_Kono: AndreMA: unchellmatt: No one is forcing you to be here.

Nobody appointed you gatekeeper, either. If you don't care for what Lee Jackson Beauregard has to say, there's an "ignore" function available. Personally I don't care either, but your response annoys me far more than he does.

Used to be there was a "scratch pad" thread here on Fark, might be still, where people would go to try stuff out so they wouldn't spam threads with their self-aggrandizing bullsh*t.  People were encouraged to use it. Apparently, you like self-aggrandizing bullsh*t spamming your threads.


Actually it was a nice demonstration of some of the potential problems with anonymous internet usage, in a thread that deals with social networking sites concerns regarding expectations of members privacy.

I actually have had the same problem with TOR in the past, getting comments shadowbanned while using it.  Wikipedia suddenly decided it didn't like me either, as did a few other sites.  The problem isn't so much that those sites look for TOR and block it; that's not (to my understanding) how it works.  What happens is that the exit nodes have been used by other TOR users to post offending content, leading to those IPs being assigned the blocks automatically.

Which is a problem for people who want to do two things: participate in Internet socialization, but do so anonymously.  There's absolutely no good answer here, unfortunately.
2013-07-03 07:57:57 AM
1 votes:

Kimpak: Say all this outrage actually kills off the NSA.


How does forcing the the Government to get a warrant based on probable cause of wrongdoing before spying on American citizens, as the Constitution requires, killing off anything?
2013-07-03 07:40:35 AM
1 votes:

ontariolightning: Protest for a day..big flipping whoop



stevenhomartialarts.com
2013-07-03 06:30:25 AM
1 votes:
Personal privacy isn't even a concept until puberty, and after that people immediately sell it wholesale to any and every entity providing a service.  People are livid that the government can ask for and receive their phone records from the phone company, yet I see no ire for the phone company.  So, you'll excuse me if my reaction to this is similar to the reaction I have when i read a particularly overwrought piss 'n' moan in the Consumerist.  Even those people are at least pointing fingers at the actual source of their alarm.

This is the social equivalent to stomping and slamming doors.  And that's really your problem.  Here you are thinking of your own government as an upset adolescent views his parents.  I have to ask, if that's how you view government, what gives you the right to indict my view of my own personal freedom?
2013-07-03 06:24:11 AM
1 votes:

You'd turn it off when I was halfway across: Now, I can't know if Glenn Greenwald is telling the truth about this, but my limited experience of Glenn Greenwald's writing has lead me to conclude he is the classic "bullshiatter", i.e. someone for whom matters of truth and falsehood are entirely secondary to his ego's need to convince people he's right.


My experience with Mr. Greenwald's writing is not limited at all.

He has consistently opposed warrantless spying on Americans.

He opposed it when Bush did it.

He continues to oppose it just as much as ever now that Obama is doing it.

This is exactly how a principled civil libertarian behaves. It's not suddenly OK when your team does it.
2013-07-03 06:04:45 AM
1 votes:

ThrobblefootSpectre: Translation - the people who screamed for big government are getting exactly what they wanted.


So are the people who screamed for small government.  What people are screaming for means f*ck-all in regards to truth or integrity.  Unless it's ice cream.
2013-07-03 05:45:00 AM
1 votes:

HotWingAgenda: The Confederacy insisted on individual liberty no matter what,


t2.gstatic.com
2013-07-03 05:44:33 AM
1 votes:
You know, if you look objectively at the laws and actions of the good old USA they are acting much worse than other nations who have been deemed fit to be invaded and shown the proper way to treat their citizens...
2013-07-03 05:26:20 AM
1 votes:

HotWingAgenda: the USA is about having a strong central government looking out for everyone's mutual best interests, vice a few specific powers that the people hold back from it.


Remember when the government was restricted in powers except for what it was explicitly granted?  Fun times.

I think that lasted about two years.
2013-07-03 05:13:40 AM
1 votes:

Wangiss: Situation one:
You're chilling with your friends, and you talk about sex, drugs and rock and roll.

Situation two:
You're sitting with a federal agent, and he asks you about sex, drugs, and rock and roll.


Situation three:  You're talking with your friends online about sex, drugs, and rock and roll, and a federal agent is monitoring.

Not having any expectation of privacy when using virtually any modern communication technology really creates a chilling effect.
2013-07-03 05:12:45 AM
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: stonelotus: in related news, Fark still censors the fark out of the Internet.

When I can use uncensored swear words here, maybe I'll be impressed, yeah.


Fark isn't a government. It's a privately-owned website. Drew's sandbox, Drew's rules.
2013-07-03 04:58:03 AM
1 votes:

ThrobblefootSpectre: ghostwind: This is a perfect example of a rather innocuous misunderstanding, leading to two kids being denied entry to the US for no legitimate reason

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/london/think-before-you-tweet-why-two-teen ag ers-were-refused-entry-to-the-u-s/2802

BTW, you may want to find a better example if you want to register higher than a 0.00 on the outrage meter.  For one thing tweets are public information that anyone can see.  And secondly, there is no "right" for non-citizens to enter the U.S.  All in all that wasn't quite enough to convince me of the pervasive "this is the end of freedom, we are all doomed" attitude.

/P.S. the guy at your next job interview will be reading your tweets also.


We live in public.

Everyone cool with that?
2013-07-03 04:57:47 AM
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: All the NSA did was ask Verizon for ISP addresses.

Why is NSA's information gathering so dreadful?


This is why we can't have nice things; too many uninformed people without a farking clue trying to persuade others that what the NSA is doing is OK.
2013-07-03 04:50:28 AM
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: How is what they're doing worse than what people vomit all over Facebook every single day?


Because some people voluntarily over-share, everyone's cell phone should be turned into a 24/7 tracking device?

The Obama administration told a federal court Tuesday that the public has no "reasonable expectation of privacy" in cellphone location data, and hence the authorities may obtain documents detailing a person's movements from wireless carriers without a probable-cause warrant.
2013-07-03 04:40:31 AM
1 votes:

Lernaeus: quickdraw: Can someone explain to me how what NSA is doing is more invasive than what we willingly surrender to Google all day long?

I don't even know where to begin, save to say that this blasé attitude towards domestic surveillance is exactly the kind of thing authoritarian regimes depend on.

It makes it really easy for them to roll over you if you're already laying down.

And it makes it harder for the rest if us to stand up to them.


Begin somewhere. How is what they're doing worse than what people vomit all over Facebook every single day? I won't even ask you to be specific, just a general answer will do. Just answer this question:

Right now, I can go on any random Facebook wall and find out where any random person is eating, what they're eating, who they're eating with; where they shop, what they wear, what they drive, where they work, who they work with; the approximate location of their home, who their spouse is, their kids if any, where their kids go to school and what they do there; their hobbies and favorite pastimes. And they put all that out there for anyone who wants it, to peruse at their leisure.

All the NSA did was ask Verizon for ISP addresses.

Why is NSA's information gathering so dreadful?
2013-07-03 04:24:53 AM
1 votes:

Wrencher: Metal: Who hasn't known NSA uses every chance to spy? oh but NOW we want to do something?

Better late, than never...


This
2013-07-03 04:22:08 AM
1 votes:

sendtodave: pkjun: And I think it's telling that, for the most part, the sites that are protesting this are the sites that are most heavily trafficked by people who were too young to pay attention to politics seven years ago when this story broke.

Or perhaps the ones more likely to be party van'd!  Silly 4chan pedos and anarchists.

So, we've got criminals, people too young to understand why this is OK, people too old to understand why this is OK, people too naive to understand why this is OK, people too ignorant to understand why this is OK, traitors country, foreigners, and the ACLU.

Hm, any other ways we can slander opposition to government overreach in the name of "Meh, who cares?"


Favorited.
2013-07-03 04:15:38 AM
1 votes:

Metal: Who hasn't known NSA uses every chance to spy? oh but NOW we want to do something?


Better late, than never...
2013-07-03 04:13:31 AM
1 votes:

Metal: Wangiss: Metal: Who hasn't known NSA uses every chance to spy? oh but NOW we want to do something?

Until what time would you prefer to wait?

More like, don't bother.


Perhaps I should have been clearer: What is the smallest constitutional breach that could rouse you to action?  Do they have to start quartering soldiers in your house?
2013-07-03 04:06:33 AM
1 votes:

Wangiss: Metal: Who hasn't known NSA uses every chance to spy? oh but NOW we want to do something?

Until what time would you prefer to wait?


More like, don't bother.
2013-07-03 03:57:32 AM
1 votes:

howdoibegin: America -a mildly decent country that hasn't topped a single quality of life index even way before 9/11. I think you guys should protest against corporate interests - your government is their boy toy. You're not America dammit, you're just America. A country that was way up in incarceration rates, the largest gun industry in the world, and awful healthcare and social policies, again, before 9/11. You guys (or parents) elected Reagan, in landslides, twice. For farks sake, neuter your middle man industries and lobbiests - it's a clear vote of non confidence (on your own fellow citizens even) if you think they can't make money and drive the economy without relying on unilateral trade warfare.

Or you can continue to blame the empire lite decline on immigration and government largess. Your call.


The silly part in your plan is that government has the prerogative of force whereas industries do not.  The industries have exactly as much power as our corrupt government gives them.  When governments regulate industries, they simply pick winners.  When the People regulate government, we're all winners.  The linchpin is exactly that body of governors whom we elect.  It is their feet we can and must hold to the fire.  It is their duty to not take kickbacks, to not play favorites, and to not turn a blind eye to injustice.  Pretending that corporations are causing government corruption pits a fool's dagger against a hydra.
2013-07-03 03:56:43 AM
1 votes:
San Francisco
11:00am
UN Plaza
4th of July
Restore the 4th

I WILL BE THERE
2013-07-03 03:52:54 AM
1 votes:
Who hasn't known NSA uses every chance to spy? oh but NOW we want to do something?
2013-07-03 03:35:08 AM
1 votes:

Mock26: Oh yeah, this will make the NSA change their ways!


Good point.  Better just accept it and do nothing then.

/Bismillahi rahmani raheem
//Allahu akhbah
///Bombs bombs bombs and more bombs.  Bomb the infidels

//Could it be theoretically possible to spam the shiat out of NSA databases by making everyone send this kind of shiat?
2013-07-03 03:32:34 AM
1 votes:
Cyclometh - The American experiment, for all intents and purposes, is over.
The issue is not that they ARE. It is that they CAN.


You got it right. And, for those who say "I wish they would spy on me. They would be bored to death in a matter of minutes." don't seem to realize that, if in fact you were not doing anything of merit, and the government was spying on you, they would certainly come up with something to make you interesting to the Attorney General's office. We are about to have to make a decision based on the dual legal system in this country, and this abuse of power is one of the main contentions.

images4.wikia.nocookie.net
WHETHER THE PROOF EXISTS OR NOT, I KNOW
I WILL FIND IT!

/remember this little gem? Sadly, it is more true than anyone wants to admit...
2013-07-03 03:30:09 AM
1 votes:

AndreMA: Posting encrypted random content (bonus for destroying the private key afterwards) in various places will keep the NSA computers from getting lonely... since they seem to class "accidental" collection of encrypted content from US citizens OK to retain for 5 years, just as they do if they think there's "evidence of a crime"

Let's fill up that new data center in Utah with encrypted lolcats.


FTFM
2013-07-03 03:28:06 AM
1 votes:
Posting encrypted random content (bonus for destroying the private key afterwards) in various places will keep the NSA computers from getting lonely... since they seem to class "accidental" collection from US citizens OK to retain for 5 years, just as they do if they think there's "evidence of a crime"

Let's fill up that new data center in Utah with encrypted lolcats.
2013-07-03 03:25:57 AM
1 votes:
Install a Tor or I2P non exit relay, turn them up a bit, make sure they're open and can relay data, and then do nothing with them but let them relay data for others.

Add to the noise a little.
2013-07-03 03:24:13 AM
1 votes:
Nothing short of the deaths of many who are involved at the upper levels will have any effect.  Either that or the deaths of their families.  Either one will be fine as long as things turn away from the gestapo so many seem to want.
2013-07-03 03:19:14 AM
1 votes:
memeguy.com
2013-07-03 03:03:16 AM
1 votes:

RoyBatty: If the Republicans in power weren't as corrupt as the Democrats in power, they would try and pin Obama to the wall for the next four years with the NSA scandal.

Presumably a pro gun rights party, because guns are needed to overthrow a tyrannical government, should be strong on the 4th amendment, 5th amendment and against government spying on its citizens (except of course in the bedroom because sodomy).

And unlike Benghazi, they would probably get a lot of support for that.


Since when did you start making sense?

Also, this has taken too long to get everyone worked up.

Now that they've been doing it this long they will never give up the power.
2013-07-03 03:00:25 AM
1 votes:
Protest for a day..big flipping whoop
2013-07-03 02:51:05 AM
1 votes:
I wish they would have warned me before I logged in.
2013-07-03 02:43:33 AM
1 votes:
Mozilla is a major website?
2013-07-03 02:30:20 AM
1 votes:

eddievercetti: SOPA Blackout Deux? Unlike SOPA however, NSA will just order drone strikes to all who fail to obey.


Note to self: buy Lockheed
2013-07-03 02:28:34 AM
1 votes:
SOPA Blackout Deux? Unlike SOPA however, NSA will just order drone strikes to all who fail to obey.
 
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