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(Ars Technica)   Old and Busted: Lasik Eye Surgery. New Hotness: Bionic Eye   (arstechnica.com) divider line 16
    More: Cool, eye surgery, sense data, optic nerves  
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2909 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Jul 2013 at 5:18 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-02 05:24:26 PM  
CSB, but LASIK was the best decision I ever made. It was covered through my employers FLEX spending program so I didn't have to dump $2200 in one shot.

I remember going home with blurry vision following the surgery, going to sleep like the doctor ordered, then waking up and looking out my windows realizing I could see each individual leaf on the trees. It was something I had never done before and was amazed.

I didn't like wearing glasses previously and the contacts I wore often made seasonal allergies worse because allergens would stick to, or get behind, the lenses.

Seriously, $2000+ and 5 minutes of feeling uncomfortable while you smell your eyes being burned is worth it.
 
2013-07-02 05:25:09 PM  
6x9?  69? sexy vision?

/it burrrrrrnsssss.
 
2013-07-02 06:17:00 PM  
Harve Bennett: Steve Austin a man barely alive.
Oscar Goldman: Gentlemen, we can rebuild him.
Oscar Goldman: We have the technology.
Oscar Goldman: We have the capability to make the world's first bionic man.
Oscar Goldman: Steve Austin will be that man.
Oscar Goldman: Better than he was before.
Oscar Goldman: Better... stronger... faster.
 
2013-07-02 06:25:41 PM  
This was already done better in 1987:

images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-07-02 06:30:15 PM  

Saberus Terras: This was already done better in 1987:

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 292x444]


Still no cure for shortsighted cops
 
2013-07-02 09:30:52 PM  

MightyPez: CSB, but LASIK was the best decision I ever made. It was covered through my employers FLEX spending program so I didn't have to dump $2200 in one shot.

I remember going home with blurry vision following the surgery, going to sleep like the doctor ordered, then waking up and looking out my windows realizing I could see each individual leaf on the trees. It was something I had never done before and was amazed.

I didn't like wearing glasses previously and the contacts I wore often made seasonal allergies worse because allergens would stick to, or get behind, the lenses.

Seriously, $2000+ and 5 minutes of feeling uncomfortable while you smell your eyes being burned is worth it.


How bad was your eyesight prior to the procedure?
 
2013-07-02 09:45:02 PM  
What was this, 1974? I'm guessing you don't make it 40 years with nuclear-powered bionics before brain cancer gets you.
1.bp.blogspot.com
 Thanks for your service, Col. Steve Austin.
 
2013-07-02 10:09:10 PM  

Yankees Team Gynecologist: MightyPez: CSB, but LASIK was the best decision I ever made. It was covered through my employers FLEX spending program so I didn't have to dump $2200 in one shot.

I remember going home with blurry vision following the surgery, going to sleep like the doctor ordered, then waking up and looking out my windows realizing I could see each individual leaf on the trees. It was something I had never done before and was amazed.

I didn't like wearing glasses previously and the contacts I wore often made seasonal allergies worse because allergens would stick to, or get behind, the lenses.

Seriously, $2000+ and 5 minutes of feeling uncomfortable while you smell your eyes being burned is worth it.

How bad was your eyesight prior to the procedure?


I don't remember my prescription, but any signs that were 10 or so feet away were just blurry blobs
 
2013-07-03 12:53:37 AM  
How is the risk factor? I'm in graphics and I've got a heavy prescription and no way in hell wanted to fark with my eyes. Plus, I may be ignorant, but do we know what'll happen down the road? My friend was telling me that every 10 years you had to go back in and get the procedure done. Granted this was in the late 90's so things may be different... or more factually correct.
 
2013-07-03 06:47:43 AM  

Mawson of the Antarctic: How is the risk factor? I'm in graphics and I've got a heavy prescription and no way in hell wanted to fark with my eyes. Plus, I may be ignorant, but do we know what'll happen down the road? My friend was telling me that every 10 years you had to go back in and get the procedure done. Granted this was in the late 90's so things may be different... or more factually correct.


Depends, there are risks tho. I'm personally very glad I had it, though it made some problems I have now with my eyes more difficult. I'm currently centrally blind in one eye (NO relation to the surgery), and I had the radial kerotonomy or whatever...the one where they cut a sunburst pattern into the eye to flatten the lens.

I couldn't see without glasses, after the surgery and one touch up (w/in a few months as the first undercorrected) I was slightly better than 20/20 in one eye, and like 20/25 or 20/30 in the other. It was fantastic. Best money I ever spent (just over $3k) and I had the surgery in the mid 1990s.

There's people who have had horrific problems though, the most public I can recall is Kathy Griffith, who was almost blinded in one eye I think. The main risk factors as I recall, are problems with night vision, and you'll lose your close up vision a little bit faster in your early 40s, or can.

Since your eyes are essential to your career...if I was you, my considerations would be based on age (having it done young means more time to enjoy it, better value for the risk), personal risk factors which I'd have an expert who isn't doing the surgery evaluate. Um, and how limiting your glasses are.

For me, I was farking terrified of anything slicing, cutting or lasering my eyeballs. Almost phobic. What tipped me into doing it was I was at work at a night job (while in college) and had a problem with my contact lenses. The only glasses I had were very dark sunglasses. It was a terrifying ride home. I realized how literally crippling my visual problems were without assistance. And living in California, earthquakes and such ~ just started worrying me. Those fears and dislike of glasses pushed me into doing it.

No regrets. THAT being said, if I hadn't had it...and was looking at it today, being older...having only one 'good' eye...I don't think I'd risk it.

If you do decide to do it, like any surgery treat it seriously. Don't go with some Dr. Nick cause it's cheap.
 
2013-07-03 07:48:42 AM  
Still no cure for Retinopathy of Prematurity... damn.

/level 4 and 5 in my right and left.
//getting closer, those science folk.
 
2013-07-03 07:52:52 AM  
I remember watching something about this a couple years ago. Back then, they were dealing with 2x2 and 3x3 resolution and the hardware restricted movement.
It's great to see the progress that has been made.
 
2013-07-03 08:52:55 AM  
I'd like a set with cutting lasers and the ability to change color please.. :)

//eyes are honestly farked..  20/70 and 20/200 after correction..
 
2013-07-03 09:21:59 AM  

Saberus Terras: This was already done better in 1987:

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 292x444]



www.oldbie.org
 
2013-07-03 12:30:33 PM  
www.atomicmoo.com


/Troll with a laser edged Wallacher combat axe was the way to go.
 
2013-07-03 12:49:32 PM  
Bionic Eye + Google Glass


C'mon, you know it is coming
 
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