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(Yahoo)   All life on earth will die out in about a billion years. Thanks Obama   (uk.news.yahoo.com) divider line 70
    More: Obvious, Obama, existence, University of St Andrews  
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2279 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Jul 2013 at 10:54 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-02 09:42:21 AM
www.nndb.com

RIP ABE VIGODA
 
2013-07-02 09:43:11 AM
Pfft. I can do it by next Thursday for half the quoted price.
 
2013-07-02 09:48:05 AM
Coming to Theaters this Christmas: Roland Emmerich's 1,000,002,014!!!
 
2013-07-02 10:00:30 AM
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com

RIP EARF
 
2013-07-02 10:55:51 AM
Meh so a lot longer than I care about.  After all it only has to last as long as I do. After that I have no stake in it.
 
2013-07-02 10:56:21 AM
Kinda a bullshiat piece for hype.  Atmosphere has never been the same.  It still won't be the same in a billion years.  All life?  Nope.  It will still be life, just not as we know it.
 
2013-07-02 10:57:42 AM
I'd better not do that reverse mortgage until a billion years from now.
But I'm going to need a hobby.
 
2013-07-02 10:59:52 AM
That takes "not even wrong" to a whole new level, considering I suspect this is a piece of right-wing concern trolling.
 
2013-07-02 11:02:01 AM

Makh: Kinda a bullshiat piece for hype.  Atmosphere has never been the same.  It still won't be the same in a billion years.  All life?  Nope.  It will still be life, just not as we know it.


Ignores the life that doesn't depend on photosynthesis too.
 
2013-07-02 11:08:36 AM
I was wondering when some scientist was going to pop his head out of their lab and say something depressing again. Seems that fearmongering and general depressing-the-sh*t-out-of-everyone is the only thing that gets them out of bed these days.
 
2013-07-02 11:09:04 AM

WelldeadLink: I'd better not do that reverse mortgage until a billion years from now.
But I'm going to need a hobby.


Ditto.  I'm thinking of stock-piling real board games like Monopoly and Checkers.  Twister and Risk.  Plus playing cards and Poker chips.  For, you know - when the Internet finally succumbs to carbonwhatever poisoning.

/"See you in Heaven, if you make the list..."

//yeah-yeah yeah yeah
 
2013-07-02 11:19:39 AM
Meh.  In a billion years humans won't exist anyway.

Either our evolutionary line will have died out completely, or we will have evolved into something (or somethings) so divergent from what we are now that we wouldn't recognize or identify it as "human."
 
2013-07-02 11:20:23 AM
More proof that this global warming climate change really is getting worse.
 
2013-07-02 11:22:03 AM

BunkoSquad: [www.nndb.com image 229x287]

RIP ABE VIGODA


he'll be the last to go.
 
2013-07-02 11:23:42 AM
Someone call the Star Whale.
 
2013-07-02 11:26:01 AM
HA-HA, the joke's on you!  We'll be lucky to not destroy every living multicellular organism on Earth within the next 500 years.
 
2013-07-02 11:27:50 AM

Doc Daneeka: Meh.  In a billion years humans won't exist anyway.

Either our evolutionary line will have died out completely, or we will have evolved into something (or somethings) so divergent from what we are now that we wouldn't recognize or identify it as "human."


Like these?
images1.wikia.nocookie.net

G-D what a shiat episode...
 
2013-07-02 11:30:53 AM

PsyLord: HA-HA, the joke's on you!  We'll be lucky to not destroy every living multicellular organism on Earth within the next 500 years.


Rather generous of you.
 
2013-07-02 11:36:42 AM

xaldin: Meh so a lot longer than I care about.  After all it only has to last as long as I do. After that I have no stake in it.



You voted for Bush, twice.  Didn't ya...didn't chya.
 
2013-07-02 11:37:12 AM

Doc Daneeka: Meh.  In a billion years humans won't exist anyway.

Either our evolutionary line will have died out completely, or we will have evolved into something (or somethings) so divergent from what we are now that we wouldn't recognize or identify it as "human."


Maybe, but I wouldn't count on it. Assuming that we are still alive I'd guess that we'll probably look fairly similar to today or at least clearly humanoid. There really aren't a lot of evolutionary pressures on humans and once we're capable of interstellar travel we will be powerful enough to shape environments to suit us. Genetic engineering will be a major factor but few people are going to want to change their children too radically from one generation to the next. Sure there will be some people who turn themselves into methane breathing slugs but I suspect that even with all the crazy variations and subspecies of human their general "humanness" and relationship to us will remain apparent.

Unless we turn ourselves into machines. Then I want us to all be 50 ft tall mechanical spiders.
 
2013-07-02 11:40:59 AM
GRAIN will be the future.Genetics,Robotics,ArtificialIntelligence, and  Nanotechnology. And now, some copypasta for your edification...

You replace a single neuron in your brain with one that functions thousands of times faster than its biological counterpart.

Are you still you? You'd probably argue that you are, and even a significant speed bump in a single neuron is likely to go largely unnoticed by your conscious mind.

Now, you replace a second neuron. Are you still you? Again, yes. You still feel like yourself. You still have the continuity of experience that typically defines individuality. You probably still don't notice a thing, and indeed, with only a couple of overachieving neurons, there wouldn't be much to notice.

So, let's ramp it up. You replace amillion neurons in your brain with these new, speedy versions, gradually over the course of several months. Sounds like a bunch, right? Not really; you've still only replaced 0.001% of your brain's natural neurons by most estimates. Are you still you? You may find you're reading books a teensy bit faster now, and comprehending them more easily. An abstract math concept (say, the Monty Hall problem) that once confused you now begins to make some sense. You're still very much human, though. You stubbed your toe this morning due to poor reflexes, resulting from a lack of sleep. You briefly felt lonely for a moment. That cute cashier turned you on as much as ever.

But why stop there? You're feeling pretty good. You embark on a neurological enhancement regimen of two billion fancy new neurons every month for a year. After this time, you've got on the order of 24 billion artificial neurons in your head, or about a quarter of your brain. Are you still you? Your feelings and emotions are still intact, as the new neurons don't somehow erase them; they just process them faster. Or they don't, depending upon your preference. About half-way through this year, you began noticing profound perceptual changes. You've developed a partially eidetic memory. Your head is awash in curiosity and wonder about the world, and you devour Wikipedia articles at a rapid clip. Within weeks you've attained a PhD-level knowledge of twenty subjects, effortlessly. You have a newfound appreciation for music- not just classical, but all genres. All art becomes not just a moving experience, but an experience embedded in a transcendental web of associations with other, far-removed concepts. Synesthesia doesn't begin to cover what you're experiencing. But here's the thing; it's not overwhelming, not to your enhanced, composite brain and supercharged mind. Maybe you've subjected yourself to dimethyltriptamine or psilocybin before, and experienced a fraction of this type of perception. But this is very different. It feels so very soft and natural, like sobering up after a long night out.

You reason (extraordinarily quickly at this point, I might add), that since you don't seem to have lost any of your internal experience, you should go whole hog, and replace the rest of it. After all, at this point, everyone else is, too. It's getting harder to find work for someone who's only a quarter upgraded. Over the next three years you continually add new digital neurons as your biological ones naturally die out. Are you still you? Following this, you are a genius by all traditional measures. Only the most advanced frontiers of mathematics and philosophy give you pause. Everything you've ever experienced, every thought that was ever recorded in your brain (biological or otherwise) is available for easy access in an instant. You became proficient in every musical instrument, just for the hell of it. Oh sure, you still had to practice; approximately ten minutes for each instrument. You're still a social creature, though, and as such, you still experience sadness, love, nostalgia, and all other human emotions. But as with a note played on a Stradivarius violin as opposed to a simple electronic function generator, your emotions now have such depth, so manyovertones. Your previous, unenhanced self could not have comprehended them. You are a god, but with the curiosity of a child. Though never religious, the phrase "born again" comes to your dizzyingly fast and complex mind.

Years pass. The same medical technology that allowed your neurons to be seamlessly replaced, aided and accelerated by a planetful of supersavants, has replaced much of your biological body as well. You're virtually immortal. Onlyvirtually, of course, because speeding toward Earth at a ludicrous speed is a comet the size of Greenland. There is general displeasure that the earth will be destroyed (and just after we got smart and finally cleaned her up!), but there's a distinct lack of existential terror. Everyone will be safe, because they are leaving. How does a civilization with billions of people, even a very clever one, evacuate billions of people from a planet in the space of years? It builds somevery large machines that circle the sun, and it uploads everyone to these machines.Uploads?People? Why sure, by now everyone has 100% electronic minds. If you've ever worked with a virtualized computer, or played a video game ROM from a long-defunct console on your new PC, you understand the concept already. These minds are simply software; in fact, they always were. Only now, they're imminently accessible, and more importantly,duplicable.

Billions of bits of minds of people are beamed across the solar system to where the computers and their enormous solar panels float, awaiting their guests. Of course, just as with your neuronal replacements all those years ago, this is a gradual process. As neurons are transferred, their counterparts in your skull are disabled. The only difference you feel is a significant lag, sometimes on the order of minutes, due to the millions of miles of distance between one half of your consciousness and the other. Eventually, the transfer is complete, and you wake up in a place looking very familiar. Virtual worlds, mimicking the earth to nanometer resolutions, have already been prepared. In the real world, gargantuan fleets of robots, both nano- and megascopic, are ready to continue building new computers, and spacecraft, and new robots, as humankind prepares to seed the cosmos with intelligence.

We haven't achieved faster-than-light travel, but our immortal minds and limitless virtual realities make distance irrelevant.

Are you still you?

Only one way to find out...
 
2013-07-02 11:46:52 AM

Jackpot777: Billions of bits of minds of people are beamed across the solar system to where the computers and their enormous solar panels float, awaiting their guests. Of course, just as with your neuronal replacements all those years ago, this is a gradual process. As neurons are transferred, their counterparts in your skull are disabled. The only difference you feel is a significant lag, sometimes on the order of minutes, due to the millions of miles of distance between one half of your consciousness and the other. Eventually, the transfer is complete, and you wake up in a place looking very familiar. Virtual worlds, mimicking the earth to nanometer resolutions, have already been prepared. In the real world, gargantuan fleets of ro


It should be noted that nanotech is *really far* from being the kind of nanotech we see in sci fi.

Like, we are still having serious, serious issues with bottom-up assembly (chemical/self assembly-there is often a shiat-ton of disorder.), and top down assembly (lithography) has its limits. We've gotten really good at making *Shapes*, and we're juuusttt starting to get a very good grasp on making those shapes stick to OTHER shapes in ways that we like (We have reached "UGG MAKE WHEEL", but are working on "UGG PUT STICK *THROUGH* WHEEL! MAKE AXLE!")

Which is, admittedly, why it's kind of an exciting field to be in. It's really rather young! (I'm working with my advisor on a method of optically-directed self assembly. I've FINALLY reproduced the work of a grad student who left two years ago, so we can finally start moving forwards....)
 
2013-07-02 11:51:24 AM

Doc Daneeka: Meh.  In a billion years humans won't exist anyway.

Either our evolutionary line will have died out completely, or we will have evolved into something (or somethings) so divergent from what we are now that we wouldn't recognize or identify it as "human."


One of the reasons I find "species!" Space Nutters so adorable.

Felgraf: It should be noted that nanotech is *really far* from being the kind of nanotech we see in sci fi.


That goes for anything. If people hear about it first in sci-fi, you are guaranteed that this person will have a complete and utter misunderstanding of the subject.

I read Engines of Creation and I think I was a pretty big nanotech nutter for a while. Until I found out about reality.

Oh.

"Nano" is just "X-TREEM" for the 2010s.
 
2013-07-02 11:59:32 AM

EdNortonsTwin: xaldin: Meh so a lot longer than I care about.  After all it only has to last as long as I do. After that I have no stake in it.


You voted for Bush, twice.  Didn't ya...didn't chya.


No actually I made it a point to not vote until this last year.  I've always made it a point to stay strictly neutral with regards to the parties; so long as their checks don't bounce I work for whoever is recognized as having won. This last year I voted for first time ever because frankly the GOP had totally jumped the tracks socially in such an extreme manner that even a mercenary like me felt they had gone too far out there. Reality is I tend to like some policies from each party and dislike almost the same number of policies in each so neutrality was easy to maintain... I didn't care who won.
 
2013-07-02 12:07:52 PM
I perused the Yahoo comments for the word "liberal" (how far into an article's comments that word is first used can be a good gauge of the derpiness of the site's audience), and I was surprised to see it didn't pop up for the first 20.

Then I got bored.
 
2013-07-02 12:15:44 PM

PsyLord: Doc Daneeka: Meh.  In a billion years humans won't exist anyway.

Either our evolutionary line will have died out completely, or we will have evolved into something (or somethings) so divergent from what we are now that we wouldn't recognize or identify it as "human."

Like these?
[images1.wikia.nocookie.net image 412x315]

G-D what a shiat episode...


Thank you for bringing up that drivel.  I think the writers phoned their story in that day.
 
2013-07-02 12:17:00 PM

Jackpot777: You replace a single neuron in your brain with one that functions thousands of times faster than its biological counterpart.


That's a nice story, but if you think our monkey-like prejudices and fears won't simply be replicated via neurological prosthetics, leading to a "have" and "have not" split in human society a la Gattaca or nearly every bit of speculative fiction relating to artificial or augmented evolution, and almost all of history, you've been huffing the same solvents as Ray Kurzweil.

Humans seek advantages over other humans in order to make their own lives easier. It would take an unprecedented sea change in human society for this to turn out to be anything but a nightmare of exploitation and nightmare. What if the first augmented humans are Iranian mullahs or Chinese Communist Party oligarchs or Donald Trump? Do you want to see a dictatorial/religious/Nazi bastard made exponentially smarter?

Do you want to be priced out of the augment market by Megamind Mecha-Trump?

I thought not.
 
2013-07-02 12:23:22 PM
Meh. Earth has only 200 million years before all life ends. The sun is getting steadily hotter as it ages, and in about 200 million years the average temperature on earth will be the boiling point of water. Game over. If we haven't spread to a thousand star systems by then we deserve to go extinct....
 
2013-07-02 12:25:26 PM

mark12A: The sun is getting steadily hotter as it ages,


Uh oh, the Sun has Middle Aged Delusional Syndrome. How much longer until it buys a red Ferrari and starts dating a young nebula?
 
2013-07-02 12:26:54 PM

that bosnian sniper: That takes "not even wrong" to a whole new level, considering I suspect this is a piece of right-wing concern trolling.


What the fark are you talking about? The headline? If so, you should realize that often there are these things called jokes in headlines to kncrease the chance of green light.

Stop bringing politics into things that have nothing to do with them
 
2013-07-02 12:31:53 PM
I knew there was no good reason to go to work today.
 
2013-07-02 12:51:00 PM
99.9% of the species that have been on earth have come and gone. Why do we think we're going to escape that? We either leave the planet, or we'll naturally perish when whatever happened to mars happens to earth..

//deserts actually do spread that way
 
2013-07-02 12:55:03 PM

Somaticasual: 99.9% of the species that have been on earth have come and gone. Why do we think we're going to escape that? We either leave the planet, or we'll naturally perish when whatever happened to mars happens to earth..


faculty.guhsd.net
 
2013-07-02 01:10:34 PM
There was another simulation that showed as the sun grows bigger,  Earth's orbit would be pushed out farther to compensate for the additional heat.
 
2013-07-02 01:16:15 PM

ltdanman44: There was another simulation that showed as the sun grows bigger,  Earth's orbit would be pushed out farther to compensate for the additional heat.


I'm not an astrophysicist, so I'm a little puzzled that a larger sun would 'push' Earth into an orbit with a greater radius.  Can someone explain?
 
2013-07-02 01:16:25 PM

karl2025: Makh: Kinda a bullshiat piece for hype.  Atmosphere has never been the same.  It still won't be the same in a billion years.  All life?  Nope.  It will still be life, just not as we know it.

Ignores the life that doesn't depend on photosynthesis too.


Many lifeforms can survive with no atmosphere or a completely different atmosphere.  What will eventually kill them off (and TFA only briefly touches on it) is that around the same time, the surface of the Earth will eventually become too hot to sustain liquid water.  No known living organism can survive without liquid water.
 
2013-07-02 01:19:52 PM

PsyLord: ltdanman44: There was another simulation that showed as the sun grows bigger,  Earth's orbit would be pushed out farther to compensate for the additional heat.

I'm not an astrophysicist, so I'm a little puzzled that a larger sun would 'push' Earth into an orbit with a greater radius.  Can someone explain?


It's because of the solar wind.  When the sun becomes a gas giant about five billion years from now, it will grow much larger, but the solar wind will also strengthen, possibly pushing the inner planets into more distant orbits.  Which would mean any remaining life on Earth would be slightly less screwed.

As I understand it, though, it's a moot point because the sun will heat up to the point where Earth can't sustain liquid water long before the gas giant stage.
 
2013-07-02 01:20:20 PM

To The Escape Zeppelin!: Doc Daneeka: Meh.  In a billion years humans won't exist anyway.

Either our evolutionary line will have died out completely, or we will have evolved into something (or somethings) so divergent from what we are now that we wouldn't recognize or identify it as "human."

Maybe, but I wouldn't count on it. Assuming that we are still alive I'd guess that we'll probably look fairly similar to today or at least clearly humanoid. There really aren't a lot of evolutionary pressures on humans and once we're capable of interstellar travel we will be powerful enough to shape environments to suit us. Genetic engineering will be a major factor but few people are going to want to change their children too radically from one generation to the next. Sure there will be some people who turn themselves into methane breathing slugs but I suspect that even with all the crazy variations and subspecies of human their general "humanness" and relationship to us will remain apparent.


I think you are underestimating the amount of time 1 billion years is.  Think about how different species on Earth look today compared to 1 billion years ago.  That's the degree of difference we are talking about here.

Even if we posit that natural selection has ceased operating on humans (which I strongly dispute, as millions die every year from infectious disease, starvation, etc.), you should note that natural selection is only one driver of genetic change out of several, including sexual selection, genetic drift, etc.

We couldn't stop the human population from gradual genetic change even if we wanted to, and over a billion years (i.e. a farking long-ass time), that gradual change is going to result in something unrecognizable.

And if we do succeed in interstellar travel and colonizing other worlds, I think that would virtually guarantee that humanity would speciate into several distinct descendent species, as those colony populations are likely to be pretty reproductively isolated from each other.
 
2013-07-02 01:32:16 PM
img.pandawhale.com
 
2013-07-02 01:36:37 PM

PsyLord: ltdanman44: There was another simulation that showed as the sun grows bigger,  Earth's orbit would be pushed out farther to compensate for the additional heat.

I'm not an astrophysicist, so I'm a little puzzled that a larger sun would 'push' Earth into an orbit with a greater radius.  Can someone explain?


It wouldn't.
 
2013-07-02 01:49:04 PM
Somehow I'm not so worried about that. The chances of some catastrophic event occurring before then is not out of the question, and more probable given the history of the planet. Besides, the Sun will age and turn red giant, and then there's the eventual heat death of the Universe to contend with.

Life is short, but the years are long. Maybe we should concentrate on the life in our days, rather than the days of our life....
 
2013-07-02 01:50:48 PM

qorkfiend: PsyLord: ltdanman44: There was another simulation that showed as the sun grows bigger,  Earth's orbit would be pushed out farther to compensate for the additional heat.

I'm not an astrophysicist, so I'm a little puzzled that a larger sun would 'push' Earth into an orbit with a greater radius.  Can someone explain?

It wouldn't.



Helium Flash
 
2013-07-02 01:54:16 PM
Well no shiat, everything evolved....to kill Humans.
 
2013-07-02 01:56:50 PM

qorkfiend: PsyLord: ltdanman44: There was another simulation that showed as the sun grows bigger,  Earth's orbit would be pushed out farther to compensate for the additional heat.

I'm not an astrophysicist, so I'm a little puzzled that a larger sun would 'push' Earth into an orbit with a greater radius.  Can someone explain?

It wouldn't.


Actually it might.  As the sun ages it looses mass as that mass is converted to energy.  Less mass = less gravity.  This means that the Earth's orbit will get wider but by how much is unknown because there are many factors involved here including how quickly the sun loses mass in relation to how bright it gets. Also there is orbital friction (very very small) that also slows the Earth while it goes around that will have some small but measurable effect over the vast amount time this will take place in.  Sunlight also pushes though when it comes to the earths size that is not much either. (see solar sails)

My best guess is that life on Earth can continue as what would be considered normal for the next billion years or so then for the next 300 millions years after that give or take it will slowly die out unless there is a radical breakthrough in biological chemistry on par with the event of photosynthesis.

That said we have a long long way to go with complex life being on Earth being that the complex life has only been present about 600 (probably a bit less) million years or less.  So About 1/3 of the way through Earths story.
 
2013-07-02 01:58:50 PM
"Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-two million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches smart phones are a pretty neat idea."

/ Fixed that for you Douglas
/ RIP
 
2013-07-02 02:00:28 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Doc Daneeka: Meh.  In a billion years humans won't exist anyway.

Either our evolutionary line will have died out completely, or we will have evolved into something (or somethings) so divergent from what we are now that we wouldn't recognize or identify it as "human."

One of the reasons I find "species!" Space Nutters so adorable.

Felgraf: It should be noted that nanotech is *really far* from being the kind of nanotech we see in sci fi.

That goes for anything. If people hear about it first in sci-fi, you are guaranteed that this person will have a complete and utter misunderstanding of the subject.

I read Engines of Creation and I think I was a pretty big nanotech nutter for a while. Until I found out about reality.

Oh.

"Nano" is just "X-TREEM" for the 2010s.


Don't worry Mr Vandal Savage, you'll get to live out your days alone under a red sun.
 
2013-07-02 02:01:43 PM

PsyLord: Doc Daneeka: Meh.  In a billion years humans won't exist anyway.

Either our evolutionary line will have died out completely, or we will have evolved into something (or somethings) so divergent from what we are now that we wouldn't recognize or identify it as "human."

Like these?


G-D what a shiat episode...


I was thinking that he'd basically go insane and turn into a prophet that no one could really understand.

/but the marketing dept. had already ordered ten thousand action figures I guess.
 
2013-07-02 02:06:44 PM

Valiente: What if the first augmented humans are Iranian mullahs or Chinese Communist Party oligarchs or Donald Trump? Do you want to see a dictatorial/religious/Nazi bastard made exponentially smarter?


See:  Vernor Vinge, "Bookworm, Run!"
 
2013-07-02 02:23:53 PM
If I'm still here in a billion years, I'd think I'd welcome the end.
 
2013-07-02 02:32:02 PM

karl2025: Ignores the life that doesn't depend on photosynthesis too.


There are radioactive mushrooms growing in the Chernobyl core.

/look it up, they're there
//yeah life was already here before, but...
/that's moot because life is already here now
 
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