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(Omaha World Herald)   "People don't realize it, but some potting soil is actually flammable"   (omaha.com) divider line 53
    More: Scary, potting soil, cigarettes  
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6381 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Jul 2013 at 1:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-01 04:04:35 PM
Maybe cut back on the fertilizer....
 
2013-07-01 04:07:39 PM
Now I know where I went wrong...
 
2013-07-01 04:08:48 PM
I think it's actually the big chunks of peat moss that catch fire

/but maybe that was just when I did it
 
2013-07-01 04:38:55 PM
Everything's flammable, subby.  People just give up too easily.
 
2013-07-01 05:09:47 PM
Someone put out a cigarette in one of my pots during winter and the thing smoldered for hours in my basement. I was really lucky that the house didn't burn down and that the soil was more "smolderable" than flammable.
 
2013-07-01 11:47:09 PM
no
potting soil is not flammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flammable

please die in a potting soil fire
 
2013-07-01 11:48:02 PM
No shiat.

Lit some incense once a long time ago and stuck it in a plant and later went to sleep thinking the soil would make it go out.

By morning the potting soil/peat moss mix had burned down to the bottom of the plastic pot and my carpet had a perfectly round burn mark in it.

Place smelled nice though so it wasn't all bad.

/Stupid story, Bro?
//Oh, I know.
//Now I do anyways.
 
2013-07-02 12:05:24 AM

namatad: no
potting soil is not flammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flammable

please die in a potting soil fire


Flammable:  capable of being easily ignited and of burning quickly

i105.photobucket.com
Anything is flammable, if you're willing to put some effort into it.

Kids these days; bunch of slackers.
 
2013-07-02 01:32:18 AM
Many things are flammable if you get the temperature high enough.
 
2013-07-02 01:35:51 AM
Sounds like somebody needs to water their plants a little more often.
 
2013-07-02 01:36:51 AM

namatad: no
potting soil is not flammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flammable


But it is inflammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/inflammable
 
2013-07-02 01:38:57 AM
pbs.twimg.com
Inflammable means flammable? What a country!
 
2013-07-02 01:39:08 AM

gerbilpox: namatad: no
potting soil is not flammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flammable

But it is inflammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/inflammable


So THAT's what is in those trucks!
 
2013-07-02 01:49:49 AM
Come on people, you do know that you are required to take safety and handling classes to handle or sell fertilizer?

Shiat is dangerous, yo.
 
2013-07-02 02:20:45 AM
BAN DIRT! I hear that's the stuff those filthy hippies use to grow their demon weed.
 
2013-07-02 02:33:22 AM
Yeah, I've had some old dried out potting soil, and yeah, it will burn.
It takes some serious effort to wet it down again.
 
2013-07-02 02:38:42 AM
This just in. People pay for dirt. Next they'll be paying for air.
 
2013-07-02 02:39:31 AM

xynix: Someone put out a cigarette in one of my pots during winter and the thing smoldered for hours in my basement. I was really lucky that the house didn't burn down and that the soil was more "smolderable" than flammable.


When I was a kid my mom put a cig out in a flower bed along the house. The peat caught fire and lit the cedar siding on fire, which interrupted my Saturday morning cartoons. The ride in the fire truck almost made up for it.
 
2013-07-02 02:46:20 AM
Oh, sure, it may be flammable. But is it *inflammable*?
 
2013-07-02 03:18:10 AM
img827.imageshack.us

mamoru: Oh, sure, it may be flammable. But is it *inflammable*?


Inflammable is when it's MORE than flammable. This soil, it's not just flammable, it's IN-flammable.
 
2013-07-02 03:20:49 AM
Inflammable means flammable? What a country! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nO3Wfenv4Mo
 
2013-07-02 03:46:08 AM

PapaChester: Come on people, you do know that you are required to take safety and handling classes to handle or sell fertilizer?

Shiat is dangerous, yo.


+1 for being funny.

Potting soil is not "just" soil.  It's highly enriched with either chemical fertilizer and/or rotting vegetable matter(which is itself burnable as well as exuding chemicals and gasses that burn).  The DIY variety, compost, can go up as well.  Saw on the local news someone set half their house on fire because the compost heap was close to the house just a couple days ago.

Soil itself is comprised of the same things that are in potting soil, but more generally dessicated, ground down and containing more minerals(as in from hard water(calsium/limestone, and sand and clay).  The less of the rotting matter there is, the more dusty and pale it is.  Up where I live it's almost black when it's wet.  If you live where there's not much moisture, less plants grow and therefore that fresh vegetation is not added to it and it dries out and crumbles, leaving much less matter and more useless minerals.

What I find interesting, even on well cleaned vegetables, I find they commonly taste like dirt(not that I eat dirt mind you, but i've face planted in it by accident, or had a tire fling it in my face), because that is what they ate(if you look at it that way)(obviously you get less of this with things like onions and tomatoes and peppers, but it's very true for greens like lettuce, celery, etc).  Much the same way meats(and milk) can be flavored by what the animals eat.

So it really got me to thinking.  I'd like to try the meat off a higher tier predator.  Say, lion or tiger, maybe timberwolf, top of the food chain animals that mostly feed on other animals.

Kinda odd if you think about it, you really have to work to have a food chain that's got more than a couple links.

/why no, I'm not on meds, thank you very much
//should I be?
 
2013-07-02 03:52:28 AM

omeganuepsilon: So it really got me to thinking.  I'd like to try the meat off a higher tier predator.  Say, lion or tiger, maybe timberwolf, top of the food chain animals that mostly feed on other animals.


there is a reason we dont eat a lot of predator meat.
mostly it is gamey and nasty
then you can get into bioconcentration of toxins

and then I just move on to my nice safe beff
 
2013-07-02 03:59:42 AM

namatad: omeganuepsilon: So it really got me to thinking.  I'd like to try the meat off a higher tier predator.  Say, lion or tiger, maybe timberwolf, top of the food chain animals that mostly feed on other animals.

there is a reason we dont eat a lot of predator meat.
mostly it is gamey and nasty
then you can get into bioconcentration of toxins

and then I just move on to my nice safe beff


I prefer my tuna to be chock full of mercury, thank you very much.
 
mhd
2013-07-02 04:08:41 AM
i.imgur.com
"Not many people know this, but the turtle is nature's suction cup."
 
2013-07-02 04:28:20 AM
I seem to recall my mothers potting soil having little bits of styrofoam in it. That shiat is seriously flammable!
 
2013-07-02 04:38:04 AM

namatad: omeganuepsilon: So it really got me to thinking.  I'd like to try the meat off a higher tier predator.  Say, lion or tiger, maybe timberwolf, top of the food chain animals that mostly feed on other animals.

there is a reason we dont eat a lot of predator meat.
mostly it is gamey and nasty
then you can get into bioconcentration of toxins

and then I just move on to my nice safe beff


While that's a let down and a relief at the same time...I have no idea what a beff is.
 
2013-07-02 05:19:54 AM

namatad: no
potting soil is not flammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flammable

please die in a potting soil fire


Actually, someone in Oklahoma City nearly did just that last year. So you are incorrect according to the OCFD. Someone in Kansas City also ignited potting soil last year by using a planter as an ashtray.

Some brands have styrofoam and/or wood chips in them--both of which are flammable. If not kept properly watered (which can be a challenge in places suffering drought and that are on water restrictions), yes, potting soil can ignite--and no, it doesn't necessarily take a cigarette: 115 degree-plus temperatures in direct sunlight under extreme drought conditions are sufficient, again, according to a statement last summer by the OCFD after a fire in which that was exactly what occurred. Apparently, Colorado Springs has also put the word out about the issue, and the ATF has linked at least one fire where a man was killed to a pot of Miracle Gro potting soil igniting in a plastic pot where the soil was half dried. (From what I can see in the story, no mention of using the planter as an ashtray there, either)

But hey--who am I to argue with such an esteemed expert as yourself? Clearly you know more than the guys who put out and investigate fires for a living. Keep on using potted plants as ashtrays--please. The world would be better off with one less dumbass in it.
 
2013-07-02 05:20:38 AM

Medic Zero: I seem to recall my mothers potting soil having little bits of styrofoam in it. That shiat is seriously flammable!


That's vermiculite. It's added to potting soil to absorb water and condition the soil. It swells up when wet, and can be used to plug leaky earth-fill dams. It's also added to soil when raising worms. And although it looks like it's styrofoam, it's nonflammable. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiculite
 
2013-07-02 05:40:22 AM

Aigoo: namatad: no
potting soil is not flammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flammable

please die in a potting soil fire

Actually, someone in Oklahoma City nearly did just that last year. So you are incorrect according to the OCFD. Someone in Kansas City also ignited potting soil last year by using a planter as an ashtray.

Some brands have styrofoam and/or wood chips in them--both of which are flammable. If not kept properly watered (which can be a challenge in places suffering drought and that are on water restrictions), yes, potting soil can ignite--and no, it doesn't necessarily take a cigarette: 115 degree-plus temperatures in direct sunlight under extreme drought conditions are sufficient, again, according to a statement last summer by the OCFD after a fire in which that was exactly what occurred. Apparently, Colorado Springs has also put the word out about the issue, and the ATF has linked at least one fire where a man was killed to a pot of Miracle Gro potting soil igniting in a plastic pot where the soil was half dried. (From what I can see in the story, no mention of using the planter as an ashtray there, either)

But hey--who am I to argue with such an esteemed expert as yourself? Clearly you know more than the guys who put out and investigate fires for a living. Keep on using potted plants as ashtrays--please. The world would be better off with one less dumbass in it.


It's really the same thing as a dry untended mulch pile catching fire. Heat builds up from decomposition in the center and viola fire. I've heard it can happen with hay bales as well under the right conditions.
 
2013-07-02 05:52:06 AM

namatad: omeganuepsilon: So it really got me to thinking.  I'd like to try the meat off a higher tier predator.  Say, lion or tiger, maybe timberwolf, top of the food chain animals that mostly feed on other animals.

there is a reason we dont eat a lot of predator meat.
mostly it is gamey and nasty
then you can get into bioconcentration of toxins

and then I just move on to my nice safe beff


Theres this whole new kind of predominantly predator meat out there that is really becoming popular. Its called ":fish".
 
2013-07-02 06:07:00 AM
Damn smokers feel that the whole world is their ashtray.
 
2013-07-02 07:19:47 AM

namatad: no
potting soil is not flammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flammable

please die in a potting soil fire


your idiot to decent posts ratio is alarming.
 
2013-07-02 07:35:27 AM

JackalRabbit: This just in. People pay for dirt. Next they'll be paying for air.


Too late...
 
2013-07-02 07:53:45 AM

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Medic Zero: I seem to recall my mothers potting soil having little bits of styrofoam in it. That shiat is seriously flammable!

That's vermiculite. It's added to potting soil to absorb water and condition the soil. It swells up when wet, and can be used to plug leaky earth-fill dams. It's also added to soil when raising worms. And although it looks like it's styrofoam, it's nonflammable. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiculite


Actually the "styrofoam" people are talking about is perlite, a mineral added to potting mixes to add aeration.  But, same deal, it's not flammable.
 
2013-07-02 07:56:47 AM
Coconut husks?
 
2013-07-02 08:01:23 AM

MrHappyRotter: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Medic Zero: I seem to recall my mothers potting soil having little bits of styrofoam in it. That shiat is seriously flammable!

That's vermiculite. It's added to potting soil to absorb water and condition the soil. It swells up when wet, and can be used to plug leaky earth-fill dams. It's also added to soil when raising worms. And although it looks like it's styrofoam, it's nonflammable. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiculite

Actually the "styrofoam" people are talking about is perlite, a mineral added to potting mixes to add aeration.  But, same deal, it's not flammable.


Actually I have seen I have seen styrofoam used in cheap potting soil as a replacement for perlite. It's to help avoid compaction.
 
2013-07-02 08:07:31 AM

tinfoil-hat maggie: Aigoo: namatad: no
potting soil is not flammable
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flammable

please die in a potting soil fire

Actually, someone in Oklahoma City nearly did just that last year. So you are incorrect according to the OCFD. Someone in Kansas City also ignited potting soil last year by using a planter as an ashtray.

Some brands have styrofoam and/or wood chips in them--both of which are flammable. If not kept properly watered (which can be a challenge in places suffering drought and that are on water restrictions), yes, potting soil can ignite--and no, it doesn't necessarily take a cigarette: 115 degree-plus temperatures in direct sunlight under extreme drought conditions are sufficient, again, according to a statement last summer by the OCFD after a fire in which that was exactly what occurred. Apparently, Colorado Springs has also put the word out about the issue, and the ATF has linked at least one fire where a man was killed to a pot of Miracle Gro potting soil igniting in a plastic pot where the soil was half dried. (From what I can see in the story, no mention of using the planter as an ashtray there, either)

But hey--who am I to argue with such an esteemed expert as yourself? Clearly you know more than the guys who put out and investigate fires for a living. Keep on using potted plants as ashtrays--please. The world would be better off with one less dumbass in it.

It's really the same thing as a dry untended mulch pile catching fire. Heat builds up from decomposition in the center and viola fire. I've heard it can happen with hay bales as well under the right conditions.


Several years back, I got to see the soil around a fire hydrant catch fire due to the extremely hot day.  The hydrant was positioned just in such a way that it caught direct sunlight at all times, and it managed to get hot enough to ignite the soil and mulch around it.

Went into the bank that was on the property and told them they might want to call the FD.  I don't recommend anybody repeats that course of action.  I think the only reason they didn't accuse me of setting the fire was because I was in there on business anyway.
 
2013-07-02 08:36:10 AM

FloydA: Anything is flammable, if you're willing to put some effort into it.


Some things just come easy to some people.

encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2013-07-02 08:42:37 AM

omeganuepsilon: PapaChester: Come on people, you do know that you are required to take safety and handling classes to handle or sell fertilizer?

Shiat is dangerous, yo.

+1 for being funny.

Potting soil is not "just" soil.  It's highly enriched with either chemical fertilizer and/or rotting vegetable matter(which is itself burnable as well as exuding chemicals and gasses that burn).  The DIY variety, compost, can go up as well.  Saw on the local news someone set half their house on fire because the compost heap was close to the house just a couple days ago.

Soil itself is comprised of the same things that are in potting soil, but more generally dessicated, ground down and containing more minerals(as in from hard water(calsium/limestone, and sand and clay).  The less of the rotting matter there is, the more dusty and pale it is.  Up where I live it's almost black when it's wet.  If you live where there's not much moisture, less plants grow and therefore that fresh vegetation is not added to it and it dries out and crumbles, leaving much less matter and more useless minerals.

What I find interesting, even on well cleaned vegetables, I find they commonly taste like dirt(not that I eat dirt mind you, but i've face planted in it by accident, or had a tire fling it in my face), because that is what they ate(if you look at it that way)(obviously you get less of this with things like onions and tomatoes and peppers, but it's very true for greens like lettuce, celery, etc).  Much the same way meats(and milk) can be flavored by what the animals eat.

So it really got me to thinking.  I'd like to try the meat off a higher tier predator.  Say, lion or tiger, maybe timberwolf, top of the food chain animals that mostly feed on other animals.

Kinda odd if you think about it, you really have to work to have a food chain that's got more than a couple links.

/why no, I'm not on meds, thank you very much
//should I be?



Not with seafood.  Tuna is waaaaay up there.
 
2013-07-02 09:12:36 AM

xaveth: [img827.imageshack.us image 320x240]

mamoru: Oh, sure, it may be flammable. But is it *inflammable*?

Inflammable is when it's MORE than flammable. This soil, it's not just flammable, it's IN-flammable.


images3.wikia.nocookie.net

Forget which, doesn't matter!
 
2013-07-02 09:24:56 AM
Worked in a sintering plant for a while.  On the" Interview Tour of What We Do Here"  the lead man took a pinch of 90/10 powdered Steel/Copper, held it up about shoulder height, lit his lighter beneath it and sprinkled the metal onto the flame.  Resulted in a nice little flash fire.
If you put enough air between the particles anything will burn, doesn't always need to be that hot either.
About every ten years there's a particulate fire at a flour mill or a coal mine or somewhere they're making little ones out of big ones.

I worked on the ball joint line - millions and millions of Moog ball joints - still have the occasional nightmare about it
 
2013-07-02 09:28:17 AM
I too found this out the hard way. Ironicly the porch, and posibly the house, would have burned had I not stepped outside for a smoke and seen the planter burning
 
2013-07-02 12:43:12 PM

farkingismybusiness: [pbs.twimg.com image 400x300]
Inflammable means flammable? What a country!

Came here for this, well done

 
2013-07-02 01:34:57 PM

MrHappyRotter: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Medic Zero: I seem to recall my mothers potting soil having little bits of styrofoam in it. That shiat is seriously flammable!

That's vermiculite. It's added to potting soil to absorb water and condition the soil. It swells up when wet, and can be used to plug leaky earth-fill dams. It's also added to soil when raising worms. And although it looks like it's styrofoam, it's nonflammable. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiculite

Actually the "styrofoam" people are talking about is perlite, a mineral added to potting mixes to add aeration.  But, same deal, it's not flammable.


tinfoil-hat maggie: Actually I have seen I have seen styrofoam used in cheap potting soil as a replacement for perlite. It's to help avoid compaction.


Point taken. Thank you for not wishing for my horrible death in a compost conflagration! :)

/or at least keeping it to yourselves
 
2013-07-02 02:10:04 PM
Saw this happen all the flipping time while I was a grad student at the University of Kentucky. They'd done a major fertilizing job on all the shrubberies on campus in spring and covered 'em with shredded mulch; enough that you could smell that weird tang that comes with fertilizer all the time.

Long hot summer plus never watering the soil around shrubberies = little tongues of flame and smoke all over campus. Shoot, I think in some cases the light sprinkling they did do only served to concentrate the sunbeams during the highest part of the day. After I called the main office to complain they started watering the stuff down more thoroughly in the evening.

Was surprised no one knew about that issue with high amounts of fertilizer.
 
2013-07-02 02:23:05 PM

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Medic Zero: I seem to recall my mothers potting soil having little bits of styrofoam in it. That shiat is seriously flammable!

That's vermiculite. It's added to potting soil to absorb water and condition the soil. It swells up when wet, and can be used to plug leaky earth-fill dams. It's also added to soil when raising worms. And although it looks like it's styrofoam, it's nonflammable. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiculite


Thanks!
 
2013-07-02 02:25:03 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: MrHappyRotter: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Medic Zero: I seem to recall my mothers potting soil having little bits of styrofoam in it. That shiat is seriously flammable!

That's vermiculite. It's added to potting soil to absorb water and condition the soil. It swells up when wet, and can be used to plug leaky earth-fill dams. It's also added to soil when raising worms. And although it looks like it's styrofoam, it's nonflammable. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiculite

Actually the "styrofoam" people are talking about is perlite, a mineral added to potting mixes to add aeration.  But, same deal, it's not flammable.

Actually I have seen I have seen styrofoam used in cheap potting soil as a replacement for perlite. It's to help avoid compaction.


I'd swear that's what it was actually. This was cheap ass shiat from 1980, some of it in a terrarium.

All you kids who don't know what terrariums are, look it up, and then enrich your life by having one and then have it clutter your home or yard for a long time after.
 
2013-07-02 02:25:28 PM

zomega: Saw this happen all the flipping time while I was a grad student at the University of Kentucky. They'd done a major fertilizing job on all the shrubberies on campus in spring and covered 'em with shredded mulch; enough that you could smell that weird tang that comes with fertilizer all the time.


i105.photobucket.com
Tang is definitely flammable!
 
2013-07-02 02:31:15 PM

Marcintosh: Worked in a sintering plant for a while.  On the" Interview Tour of What We Do Here"  the lead man took a pinch of 90/10 powdered Steel/Copper, held it up about shoulder height, lit his lighter beneath it and sprinkled the metal onto the flame.  Resulted in a nice little flash fire.
If you put enough air between the particles anything will burn, doesn't always need to be that hot either.
About every ten years there's a particulate fire at a flour mill or a coal mine or somewhere they're making little ones out of big ones.

I worked on the ball joint line - millions and millions of Moog ball joints - still have the occasional nightmare about it



I feel you. I still get the rare nightmare from the cannery or rogueing sun flower fields. Sunflowers to the horizon in every direction in the dream. Can't go home until you've walked every row in the heat and sometimes humidity. Nothing like 106 degrees standing over furrows filled with water. The cannery is more atmospheric. The sound of the cans sliding down rails and slamming into each other lining up to go into the canning machines never goes away though. 90 days straight, no days off, two summers in a row with that one.
 
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