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(ZDNet)   Microsoft is ending Technet Subscriptions. No more cheap Windows upgrades for you and your parents   (zdnet.com) divider line 51
    More: Sad, TechNet, Windows, Microsoft, Windows Server, customer support, product key, subscribers, Essentials  
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3671 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Jul 2013 at 5:51 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-01 05:54:39 PM
i.chzbgr.com
 
2013-07-01 05:59:51 PM
i.chzbgr.com
 
2013-07-01 06:28:18 PM
media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-01 06:34:47 PM
My company pays for my MSDN subscription. Yay for me

/Linux at home
//except the game computer
 
2013-07-01 06:38:07 PM
Must be connected to those XBone DRM servers that had to be switched off.
 
2013-07-01 07:12:39 PM
This really completely sucks, since I maintain computer labs and test environments that I only need once in a great while but don't particularly want to rebuild every six months. It's also bad for those times that I need to dig up some god-awful combination of seldom-used Microsoft software that I ordinarily would have no reason to access, like legacy versions of Great Plains Accounting.

But this is Microsoft and there's every chance they'll change their mind before it's ever an issue for me.
 
2013-07-01 07:27:35 PM

envirovore: Must be connected to those XBone DRM servers that had to be switched off.


You're thinking of one of those windows playsforsure drm servers.

/don't play for sure anymore now does it?
 
2013-07-01 07:33:05 PM
This has been a kick in the nuts to IT all over.  There are still the evaluation versions, but I have been spinning up servers for trial basis like mad.  I run 6 month evaluations on software before rolling it out to the rest of the site.  Having to pull older versions has been really helpful when needed for testing.  This is a very sad day indeed.  I have a great reason to drink tonight.
 
2013-07-01 07:35:19 PM
No more MSDOS?  WTF will I ever do now?
 
2013-07-01 07:47:54 PM

SithLord: No more MSDOS?  WTF will I ever do now?


That's right DOS 6.22 is available on Technet.
 
2013-07-01 08:00:56 PM

Tom_Slick: SithLord: No more MSDOS?  WTF will I ever do now?

That's right DOS 6.22 is available on Technet.


Damn. Oh well.
 
2013-07-01 08:21:27 PM

nucrash: This has been a kick in the nuts to IT all over.  There are still the evaluation versions, but I have been spinning up servers for trial basis like mad.  I run 6 month evaluations on software before rolling it out to the rest of the site.  Having to pull older versions has been really helpful when needed for testing.  This is a very sad day indeed.  I have a great reason to drink tonight.


Agreed.  I'm not sure what Microsoft is thinking with this one.  I get that there have been piracy issues with TechNet subscriptions, but this is a valuable tool for students and IT Pros to learn about the Microsoft solutions stack and build loyalty to their brand.  I guess they're not worried about that now that they're trying to transition into some odd hybrid of Apple, Google, and whatever else is the flavor of the day.
 
2013-07-01 08:31:45 PM
too bad. a shame

i found something much faster, better, cheaper, more secure, and gets upgraded every 6 months, if i want.


Linux Mint.
 
2013-07-01 08:32:34 PM

KidneyStone: My company pays for my MSDN subscription. Yay for me

/Linux at home
//except the game computer



Linux is coming to Gaming, sister.  and it'll be faster than windows.  you're welcome.
 
2013-07-01 09:03:42 PM

Linux_Yes: too bad. a shame

i found something much faster, better, cheaper, more secure, and gets upgraded every 6 months, if i want.

My Penis.


FTFY
 
2013-07-01 09:20:13 PM
masdog: Agreed. I'm not sure what Microsoft is thinking with this one.

Based on how they've been acting in other areas of business recently, they must have had guzzled down a nice big glass of cherry flavored anti-consumer blast, fortified with over 9000% of the RDA of vitamins D, R and M.

// do they really think this will have any effect whatsoever on windows piracy?
 
2013-07-01 09:57:14 PM

Linux_Yes: KidneyStone: My company pays for my MSDN subscription. Yay for me

/Linux at home
//except the game computer


Linux is coming to Gaming, sister.  and it'll be faster than windows.  you're welcome.


Haha, keep telling yourself that. I'm sure 2014 will be the year of Linux on the desktop.
 
2013-07-01 10:20:39 PM

lordargent: Based on how they've been acting in other areas of business recently, they must have had guzzled down a nice big glass of cherry flavored anti-consumer blast, fortified with over 9000% of the RDA of vitamins D, R and M.


That and the focus on Azure and other "Cloud" services.  It seems like they're a company that is panicking about a future they see down the road if they lose their place on the desktop, and they don't know what to do so they try to mimic Apple, Google, VMware, and anyone else who is having some success in the market.

That day when Microsoft is a niche player in the market is a long way away as a good portion of companies will not transition away from Windows and Office for a long time as a large number of applications depend on that ecosystem.  They have plenty of time to reinvent themselves, but that would require good leadership with excellent foresight and an understanding of the market - something I seriously think that they're lacking.

the_rhino: Haha, keep telling yourself that. I'm sure 2014 will be the year of Linux on the desktop.


Steam now runs on Linux, and their Linux game library is growing.
 
2013-07-01 10:29:02 PM
MSDN is still available, so whatever.
 
2013-07-01 10:39:15 PM

Shazam999: MSDN is still available, so whatever.


Yeah. So when do they whack those downloads?

Microsoft has its head in the Cloud. Downloading software to your LAN is no longer part of their strategy.
 
2013-07-01 10:40:34 PM

Shazam999: MSDN is still available, so whatever.


The cheapest version of MSDN available to US users who want access to non-developer products (e.g. Microsoft Dynamics) costs over $6000.

masdog: Steam now runs on Linux, and their Linux game library is growing.


I don't care about games. I care about being able to do productive work and not having to purchase $25k in licenses to replicate a customer's production environment.

the_rhino: Haha, keep telling yourself that. I'm sure 2014 will be the year of Linux on the desktop


Truth is, Linux already sort-of won. No, it's not on the desktop. It's on your TV, your set top box, your phone or tablet. It might well be running your car or the office printer as well. It's weak on the desktop, sure, but since it runs on everything bigger than a pocket calculator so it's proliferated to pretty much everything else.
 
2013-07-01 10:47:14 PM
likefunbutnot: it runs on everything bigger than a pocket calculator

Fixed

Linux On the TI-Nspire Graphing Calculator
 
2013-07-01 11:40:43 PM
Came for Excalibur reference, leaving disappointed and apparently old.
 
2013-07-01 11:44:35 PM

phamwaa: Shazam999: MSDN is still available, so whatever.

Yeah. So when do they whack those downloads?

Microsoft has its head in the Cloud. Downloading software to your LAN is no longer part of their strategy.




Desktop as a service.
 
2013-07-01 11:49:24 PM
If I was still the Microsoft administrator I was 10 years ago (and benefited from the subscription), I'd be pissed.  As I've moved on Linux, VMware, and storage administration/engineering...It doesn't affect me that much.  Yes, I still do some Microsoft stuff (mostly related to Windows 7 on VMware View)...but very little.

However, from the professional side of things...this does create a barrier to entry for young admins that want to learn things as I did back in the day.  Say a helpdesk/deskside support tech that wants to learn server 2012/Hyper-V on their own.....this will be all that more difficult for them.  I really do worry about where we're going to develop the high-end admins/engineers of tomorrow since we've outsourced so many entry-level jobs and now we're taking away one of the inexpensive ways for people to learn on their own.
 
2013-07-01 11:54:06 PM

likefunbutnot: Truth is, Linux already sort-of won. No, it's not on the desktop. It's on your TV, your set top box, your phone or tablet. It might well be running your car or the office printer as well. It's weak on the desktop, sure, but since it runs on everything bigger than a pocket calculator so it's proliferated to pretty much everything else.


And Linux  is still growing in the datacenter.  I saw this trend 8 years ago or so and took some of my skills with Solaris to learn Red Hat while moving away from Microsoft administration.  The ability to do linux led me into VMware around ESX 3.0 (which used RHEL on the console through 4.1).
 
2013-07-01 11:58:59 PM

likefunbutnot: This really completely sucks, since I maintain computer labs and test environments that I only need once in a great while but don't particularly want to rebuild every six months. It's also bad for those times that I need to dig up some god-awful combination of seldom-used Microsoft software that I ordinarily would have no reason to access, like legacy versions of Great Plains Accounting.

But this is Microsoft and there's every chance they'll change their mind before it's ever an issue for me.


Oh, you'll be able to order up an Azure VM with a side order of musty Great Plains, I'm sure.   But it'll still cost you a day to get from there to the idiosyncratic config you're actually trying to test.
 
2013-07-02 12:27:20 AM
This blows.
 
2013-07-02 12:41:38 AM
What's cheaper than torrents?
 
2013-07-02 01:34:58 AM

slayer199: If I was still the Microsoft administrator I was 10 years ago (and benefited from the subscription), I'd be pissed.  As I've moved on Linux, VMware, and storage administration/engineering...It doesn't affect me that much.  Yes, I still do some Microsoft stuff (mostly related to Windows 7 on VMware View)...but very little.

However, from the professional side of things...this does create a barrier to entry for young admins that want to learn things as I did back in the day.  Say a helpdesk/deskside support tech that wants to learn server 2012/Hyper-V on their own.....this will be all that more difficult for them.  I really do worry about where we're going to develop the high-end admins/engineers of tomorrow since we've outsourced so many entry-level jobs and now we're taking away one of the inexpensive ways for people to learn on their own.


Young admins who want to learn things can still download Linux for free.  And before you label me as a "Year of the Linux Desktop" nutcase, I do a lot of work developing Linux software, and one of the biggest stumbling blocks for many of my coworkers is that they did not have any significant experience with Linux prior to working here.
 
2013-07-02 03:52:50 AM
media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-02 06:15:55 AM

slayer199: this does create a barrier to entry for young admins that want to learn things as I did back in the day.


I am certain they already have an arrangement with the real source of young admins today: the technical colleges in Bangalore.
 
2013-07-02 06:47:42 AM
pjmedia.com

//UNIX Admin
//The link, it is hot
 
2013-07-02 07:16:52 AM

jso2897: Linux_Yes: too bad. a shame

i found something much faster, better, cheaper, more secure, and gets upgraded every 6 months, if i want.

My Penis.

FTFY


Is your wang now at echidna-level? Or is it like the old VW Beetle, changes inside but looks the same?

/thx for the laugh
//wouldn't brag about "faster", really
///Would definitely upgrade mine, I want articulations, a baculum, and voluntary activation
 
2013-07-02 07:23:31 AM
It is not exactly rocket science to get an Action Pack subscription. Pretty much the same software as technet except for access to old software like win95.
 
2013-07-02 07:47:56 AM
Meh - it's a catch-22.

Give people a reasonable way to pay for your software and some will, but others will use it to pirate your stuff.
Take away the reasonable way to pay and most of those who would have paid are just going to pirate.

I used to pirate MS software when I was a high school student.  In college, I could get serious discounts as a student and paid $20 for a legit copy of Windows and $15 for Office, if I remember correctly.  Then I graduated and couldn't....so I kept pirating everything I wanted.  Pirating Visual Studio is the sole reason I didn't learn another language and ended up getting a job as a C# developer.  My pirating Visual Studio years ago has led to a near lock-in for me on the MS stack.  I could transition to another platform, but I don't see a compelling reason.  Naturally, any MS based software place is going to have an MSDN subscription anyway, so now I'm downloading 'legit' software again.

If it's trivial to pirate MS software and there is no cheap alternative - people like me will pirate it.
If it's hard to pirate MS software and there is no cheap alternative - people like me would use *something else*.  I'd be running Linux and developing in Python or Java right now.
 
2013-07-02 09:14:11 AM

KidneyStone: My company pays for my MSDN subscription. Yay for me


Same here. MSDN for teh win.
 
2013-07-02 09:27:38 AM

anfrind: Young admins who want to learn things can still download Linux for free. And before you label me as a "Year of the Linux Desktop" nutcase, I do a lot of work developing Linux software, and one of the biggest stumbling blocks for many of my coworkers is that they did not have any significant experience with Linux prior to working here.


That may be true, but the easiest entry into IT is still Microsoft server administration.

I'm encouraging my 14 year-old nephew to get into linux as he's shown he has some skills with a computer.  By the time he graduates, he should have a head start on others his age.
 
2013-07-02 09:33:44 AM

CheatCommando: slayer199: this does create a barrier to entry for young admins that want to learn things as I did back in the day.

I am certain they already have an arrangement with the real source of young admins today: the technical colleges in Bangalore.


That's exactly my point.  We're not developing the high-end admins of the future in the U.S.  I'm very fortunate to have started when I did on the help desk (1996-1997).  With the run up to Y2K I easily jumped into WinNT, Win2k, Win2k3, then Solaris (I bought a sparc20 to learn).  I was doing mostly Microsoft the first 8-9 years of my career before I moved into linux.  With linux I was able to easily jump into VMware.  Storage was just the last 4 years because nobody else wanted to step up and do it...and it's another part of the stack.
 
2013-07-02 09:42:32 AM

grimeystubs: It is not exactly rocket science to get an Action Pack subscription. Pretty much the same software as technet except for access to old software like win95.


I have access to both. Action Packs subs are extremely limited: 10 license activations for Office 2013 and Windows 8 Pro, 2 Server 2012 installs with 10 CALs to split between them, 1 install of Exchange and SQL Server. They're also somewhat more expensive.

Technet Pro on the other hand gives between 15 and 100 license activations of almost every desktop or infrastructure product Microsoft has ever made. Last year they took away access to individual Microsoft Office products and to Home editions of Windows, and a few things have been removed for legal reasons (Windows 2000 and Windows 98, both of which shipped with Microsoft's Java Implementation), but it's just about as complete a collection as an IT person could hope to have.
 
2013-07-02 10:01:31 AM

jso2897: Linux_Yes: too bad. a shame

i found something much faster, better, cheaper, more secure, and gets upgraded every 6 months, if i want.

My Penis.

FTFY


nope.  that one doesn't count.  my penis is not protected by the GPL
 
2013-07-02 10:08:13 AM

the_rhino: Linux_Yes: KidneyStone: My company pays for my MSDN subscription. Yay for me

/Linux at home
//except the game computer


Linux is coming to Gaming, sister.  and it'll be faster than windows.  you're welcome.

Haha, keep telling yourself that. I'm sure 2014 will be the year of Linux on the desktop.



word will eventually get around. my Linux box has always been faster than it was when windows was on it.  ext4 filesystem and no need to defrag. and it doesn't slow down over time like windows did.

Steam/Valve

http://www.zdnet.com/valve-linux-runs-our-games-faster-than-windows- 7- 7000002060/
 
2013-07-02 10:14:10 AM

slayer199: likefunbutnot: Truth is, Linux already sort-of won. No, it's not on the desktop. It's on your TV, your set top box, your phone or tablet. It might well be running your car or the office printer as well. It's weak on the desktop, sure, but since it runs on everything bigger than a pocket calculator so it's proliferated to pretty much everything else.

And Linux  is still growing in the datacenter.  I saw this trend 8 years ago or so and took some of my skills with Solaris to learn Red Hat while moving away from Microsoft administration.  The ability to do linux led me into VMware around ESX 3.0 (which used RHEL on the console through 4.1).


the Desktop will be the Final victory for Linux in America.  Monopoly$oft has its grip around OEM balls so that is the only reason why Linux isn't kicking Steve Ballmer's ass on the desktop in America.  overseas, Linux is doing much better because it doesn't have Ballmer, and his cronies to squeeze their new PC maker's balls.

everywhere else, Linux is dominant.  mobile, data center, web server, server, tivo, etc, its everywhere you want to be. international space station, Navy, government, toyota, N.Y. stock exchange, i could go on and on.

so please, Monopoly$oft fanboys, what say you??
 
2013-07-02 11:01:36 AM

slayer199: CheatCommando: slayer199: this does create a barrier to entry for young admins that want to learn things as I did back in the day.

I am certain they already have an arrangement with the real source of young admins today: the technical colleges in Bangalore.

That's exactly my point.  We're not developing the high-end admins of the future in the U.S.  I'm very fortunate to have started when I did on the help desk (1996-1997).  With the run up to Y2K I easily jumped into WinNT, Win2k, Win2k3, then Solaris (I bought a sparc20 to learn).  I was doing mostly Microsoft the first 8-9 years of my career before I moved into linux.  With linux I was able to easily jump into VMware.  Storage was just the last 4 years because nobody else wanted to step up and do it...and it's another part of the stack.


My point is that they don't care. They have their source of cheap, easily burned-out employees that they can bring in on disposable visas.
 
2013-07-02 11:19:36 AM
Work uses windows for all of their desktop and laptops they hand out. At least, that's what I thought. Just changed positions in the company and the test area computers run Linux. I was surprised.
 
2013-07-02 12:31:37 PM

likefunbutnot: Shazam999: MSDN is still available, so whatever.

The cheapest version of MSDN available to US users who want access to non-developer products (e.g. Microsoft Dynamics) costs over $6000.


Alright.  So implementing a company's CRM should cost well north of a few hundred grand at the very minimum, and you're upset about $6K?
 
2013-07-02 01:44:45 PM

CheatCommando: My point is that they don't care. They have their source of cheap, easily burned-out employees that they can bring in on disposable visas.


And the problem is that off-shore and near-shore support is incapable of troubleshooting.  If it's not on the page they can't do it.  I don't know if it's a cultural thing or the way they're trained..but they can't troubleshoot beyond what's on the page.  That doesn't grow a high-end IT person (think Tier 2, 3, 4).  We still need to grow those people here.
 
2013-07-02 04:24:53 PM

slayer199: CheatCommando: My point is that they don't care. They have their source of cheap, easily burned-out employees that they can bring in on disposable visas.

And the problem is that off-shore and near-shore support is incapable of troubleshooting.  If it's not on the page they can't do it.  I don't know if it's a cultural thing or the way they're trained..but they can't troubleshoot beyond what's on the page.  That doesn't grow a high-end IT person (think Tier 2, 3, 4).  We still need to grow those people here.


I don't have any answers, but I do have a little bit of experience working with foreign-born (Indian and Russian) software engineers.  Admittedly it's way too small a sample size to extrapolate anything meaningful, but I did notice a tendency to look at problems in a very rigid way, which often led them to overly complicated solutions (for example, a test script that was about five times longer than it needed to be).  I did not notice the same tendency in most of my American-born colleagues.
 
2013-07-02 05:47:37 PM
Makes sense. Windows 8 introduced the rapid-release cycle, and if you have that, then your upgrades are free. The other stuff is moving to SaaS.

Probably sucks for guys who work on more enterprise-grade stuff, though.
 
2013-07-02 07:18:40 PM

Shazam999: Alright.  So implementing a company's CRM should cost well north of a few hundred grand at the very minimum, and you're upset about $6K?


... because clearly that's the only useful justification for a Technet sub, right?
 
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