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(Washington Post)   "If I could, I would repeal the Internet. It is the technological marvel of the age, but it is not - as most people imagine - a symbol of progress. Just the opposite. We would be better off without it"   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 147
    More: Silly, internet, repeal, social impact, symbols, Defense Science Board, chief security officer  
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6817 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Jul 2013 at 3:16 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-01 03:38:41 PM
He's afraid cyber attacks will temporarily damage part of the internet. So he wants to get rid of the whole internet forever.

I wonder if he's worried about getting the flu this winter. If so, I have a foolproof suggestion for him:

img2.timeinc.net
 
2013-07-01 03:38:53 PM
The invention of the telephone brought us bomb threats.
The invention of the wheel brought us tanks.
The invention of fire-making brought us, er, fires....

/I got nothing
 
2013-07-01 03:38:55 PM
Back in the 80s there was a major update to the export technologies laws in the US. Turns out the Russians were undertaking a campaign of industrial espionage and this was the response but the reason for it wasn't published at the time so many heads were scratching in the tech and scientific press. I remember there was something about it in OMNI every other issue. (Yes, I'm old.)

Looks like the ChiComs are doing the same thing. Translation: they cannot innovate themselves (go figure, in a command economy where political orthodoxy is rewarded and free thought punished -- really?) so they're resorting to stealing.
 
2013-07-01 03:40:19 PM
So this guy thinks Live Free or Die Hard was a documentary?
 
2013-07-01 03:40:52 PM
I heard a fascinating Ted Talk recently about how the entire educational system has been basically rendered obsolete by the Internet.  The premise was that the educational system, as it exists today, was essentially created to churn out cogs in the "human computer" necessary to run and maintian the British Empire,  As such it focused on memorization of large quantitites of facts, the ability to do basic arithmentic in your head quickly, and to be able to write legibly and efficently.

Now that the collective human computer that ran the empire has been replaced with actual computers, and to a large extent the network of computers we call the internet, what real utilityis there to memorizing large quantities of facts, when you can almost always retrieve those same facts at a moment's notice? Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving  than it is to simply memorize it?
 
2013-07-01 03:40:55 PM
Why in the flaming fark would you want to have an internet-enabled missile?

"AGM-65D Says: About to go off-target into an orphanage! #YOLO (👍 like this)"
 
2013-07-01 03:40:58 PM

gameshowhost: It certainly does make for a nice means to propel falsehoods around the globe before the truth has a chance to get its socks on.


it is a truth that must be protected by lies
 
2013-07-01 03:41:40 PM

Carousel Beast: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

You need more coffee.


If you can't figure that out by yourself, no wonder you're a Space Nutter. You have the attention span of a gnat.
 
2013-07-01 03:42:10 PM
This guy does not comprehend 1/100th of what the internet does, and that's a fairly conservative estimate.
 
2013-07-01 03:42:11 PM
I got to "..the convenience of GPS.." and realized he thought that GPS was part of the internet and I stopped right there.  Too many stories to read to read a knuckle dragging, mouth breathing, waste of DNA.  Robert J. Samuelson, you sir are an idiot.
 
2013-07-01 03:43:44 PM
Article written by Bizarro Thomas Friedman.
 
2013-07-01 03:45:26 PM
The internet allows the ownership class to extract wealth from the serfs faster.
 
2013-07-01 03:45:51 PM
I was gonna comment on how ridiculous this is but I would rather look at cute cats on Reddit, save 2,000 pornographic images to my hard drive using an automated Firefox extension, and read Gwyneth Paltrow's Twitter and I forgot what I was going to say but ROFLMAO U mad bro?
 
2013-07-01 03:45:58 PM
The internet is not a problem.  How people use the internet is the problem.  He cites the US's defense system's vulnerabilities.  It's not the internet's fault that our government and their trillions in defense spending didn't think that opening their most sensitive information to remote access utilizing generic platforms is the internet's fault?  It's not even a hacker's fault.  If you ask me, they're practically begging to be hacked.  Guys, take a couple cool billion of the taxdollars you have but brun and take your shiat offline until you come up with a better, never used anywhere else, extra encrypted and more secure structure with strict and specific audits and corrections on who can acess your information.
 
2013-07-01 03:47:48 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: The internet allows the ownership class to extract wealth from the serfs faster.


It provides the copious stream of noise and distraction to create pliable sheep that don't even think they're serfs.
 
2013-07-01 03:48:09 PM
the convenience of GPS

Internet. GPS. Wat.

cyberwar
power grids, pipelines, communication and financial systems, business record-keeping and supply-chain operations, railroads and airlines, databases of all types (from hospitals to government agencies)


Ok, but if people stop putting things on the internet that don't belong there... And if classified systems had their other connections to the outside world (peripheral busses, CD/DVD writable drives, jacks of all kinds) removed or atleast locked down...

In the mid-1980s, most of these systems were self-contained. They relied on dedicated phone lines and private communications networks. They were hard to infiltrate.

My ass. They were hard to find and hard to understand, but then once you did there was basically no security. Because no one bothered to test anything and anyone reporting an "open door" into a system was treated with hostility and suspicion. You were more likely to be in trouble and the problem was more likely to be left hanging open.

Since then, many systems switched to the Internet. The architects of these conversions apparently underestimated the risk of sabotage.

It's all been done stupidly, certainly. See my above "start pulling cables and disconnecting things" idea. Really why does "internet" get read as "the internet, which all things must necessarily be connected to like a giant swallowing monster"?

As yet, there has been little. One publicized incident occurred in 2012 when hostile software ("malware") infected an estimated 30,000 computers of Aramco, Saudi Arabia's oil company. Business operations suffered, but oil production and delivery continued.

You're forgetting that anything truly bad gets swept under the rug, for reasons of insurance rates and lost customers and lost investors and so on.

What I'm getting at is, yes, obviously the internet has brought all kinds of trouble. But that's not intrinsic to the internet itself: Hire network administrators with brains, pay them what they're worth, and this all gets easier.
 
2013-07-01 03:49:07 PM
I hates the interwebs
www.washingtonpost.com
 
2013-07-01 03:51:53 PM
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed.

i275.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-01 03:52:07 PM
Too late...

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-01 03:52:57 PM

Magorn: I heard a fascinating Ted Talk recently about how the entire educational system has been basically rendered obsolete by the Internet.  The premise was that the educational system, as it exists today, was essentially created to churn out cogs in the "human computer" necessary to run and maintian the British Empire,  As such it focused on memorization of large quantitites of facts, the ability to do basic arithmentic in your head quickly, and to be able to write legibly and efficently.

Now that the collective human computer that ran the empire has been replaced with actual computers, and to a large extent the network of computers we call the internet, what real utilityis there to memorizing large quantities of facts, when you can almost always retrieve those same facts at a moment's notice? Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving  than it is to simply memorize it?


I haven't been to a doctor's visit in about 5 years without a doctor referring to their computers for diagnosis.  The memorization portion of Med School is going to be redundant.  The practical /physical application of care unto patients will remain.  Until the robots take over.
 
2013-07-01 03:53:10 PM
Those damn kids need to get their internet off my lawn.
 
2013-07-01 03:53:14 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Carousel Beast: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

You need more coffee.

If you can't figure that out by yourself, no wonder you're a Space Nutter. You have the attention span of a gnat.


Words have meanings, dearie. And indoor plumbing was iterative, not transformative. You have some terrific examples on there, don't get me wrong, which is why I didn't resort to the normal ad hominem you usually deserve. Hell, you seem like a pretty good guy, despite your odd technological fetishes, but you should really work on not being a douche 95% of the time.

/If 9 out of 10 people disagree with you, odds are you're the one that's wrong.
 
2013-07-01 03:53:39 PM
Dear cloud-yelling article writer person:
OK look bud, these guys said the same thing 40 years ago and they were one HELL of a lot more entertaining than you.
So just. shut. up.
www.themusicslut.com
 
2013-07-01 03:53:53 PM

p the boiler: We are getting things easier as we can do almost everything on line - but it helps consolidate wealth, takes money from local economies, takes jobs away,


That's only partially correct. What the internet has done is created a more efficient system. It's delivering goods without involving as many middlemen. While this hurts some local businesses, it helps others. Even a business as monolithic as Amazon adds something to the local economies of the cities where its customers live. It also subtracts something.

If you're running the bookstore in town, you probably don't like Amazon. If you own the UPS franchise, you do- except when demand grows to the point where you have to buy a new truck and hire another driver. Of course, your loss there is the truck-selling-guy's gain...

There are simply some businesses where it doesn't make sense for every little town to have a b&m presence. We'll keep correcting until we reach something close to the proper balance.
 
2013-07-01 03:54:10 PM
And take porn watching back to the stone age?  The hell you say!!!!!
 
2013-07-01 03:54:17 PM
www.washingtonpost.comIf I could, I would repeal the Internet and bring us all back to the days when a mustache was a sign of being manly, not "ironic."
 
2013-07-01 03:54:54 PM
As someone who has won the internets right here on this very site, I refuse to give it back!
 
2013-07-01 03:54:57 PM
This reminds me why I never read the Opinion page. The fark do I care what people think? I'm more interested in the actual, you know, news section of the newspaper. (And the comics, of course.)
 
2013-07-01 03:55:01 PM
For those foretelling the death of education due to the Internet:

Please remember that the hallmark of a GOOD education is not that it provides facts, but that it contextualizes facts.  Google can, indeed, tell you when Columbus crossed the Atlantic.  And Wikipedia might be able to tell you a lot about his life.  But if you want a good and complete answer to why he crossed then (and not 10 years earlier or later), then you need to understand the Moorish occupation of Spain, its recapture by Christians, the political competition between Spain, Portugal, and Italy for the favor of the Vatican, the rising demand for exotic goods caused by the slow uptick in discretionary spending money among the small landowners in Europe and Britain, the problems posed by the Venetian monopoly on the Silk Road, and on, and on, and on.

I'm not aware of any website, or series of them, that does anything approaching a good job of weaving these sorts of webs of knowledge together for you.  The Columbus Wiki certainly isn't going to give you much of a start.  The teacher is the synthasizer of knowledge, pulling disparate threads together in order to create a meaningful tableau of knowledge.  The web isn't going to replace that any time soon.  And the first few websites/applications that start to do even a passable job of that aren't going to be free.  They'll be competitively priced with what they're replacing.
 
2013-07-01 03:56:53 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.


The Thermos.
 
2013-07-01 03:57:27 PM

Carousel Beast: Words have meanings, dearie. And indoor plumbing was iterative, not transformative.


Really? Really???

Anyways, I hope your Musk Mars Condo (TM) doesn't have an outhouse, iterative or not, snookums honey-pie.
 
2013-07-01 03:57:52 PM
Not green enough for you Al?

/DNRTFA
 
2013-07-01 03:59:28 PM

Uberunder: For those foretelling the death of education due to the Internet:

Please remember that the hallmark of a GOOD education is not that it provides facts, but that it contextualizes facts.  Google can, indeed, tell you when Columbus crossed the Atlantic.  And Wikipedia might be able to tell you a lot about his life.  But if you want a good and complete answer to why he crossed then (and not 10 years earlier or later), then you need to understand the Moorish occupation of Spain, its recapture by Christians, the political competition between Spain, Portugal, and Italy for the favor of the Vatican, the rising demand for exotic goods caused by the slow uptick in discretionary spending money among the small landowners in Europe and Britain, the problems posed by the Venetian monopoly on the Silk Road, and on, and on, and on.

I'm not aware of any website, or series of them, that does anything approaching a good job of weaving these sorts of webs of knowledge together for you.  The Columbus Wiki certainly isn't going to give you much of a start.  The teacher is the synthasizer of knowledge, pulling disparate threads together in order to create a meaningful tableau of knowledge.  The web isn't going to replace that any time soon.  And the first few websites/applications that start to do even a passable job of that aren't going to be free.  They'll be competitively priced with what they're replacing.


Christopher Columbus directed the Harry Potter movies, Poindexter.
 
2013-07-01 04:00:38 PM
If I could, I would repeal the Internet. It is the technological marvel of the age, but it is not - as most people imagine - a symbol of progress. Just the opposite. We would be better off without it. I grant its astonishing capabilities: the instant access to vast amounts of information, the pleasures of YouTube and iTunes, the convenience of GPS and much more. But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies, and it brings with it a terrifying danger: cyberwar.  [snip]  So much depends on the Internet that its vulnerability to sabotage invites doomsday visions of the breakdown of order and trust.

By this idiotic logic, we should ban all technology. Electricity is bad because people get dependent on it, and then when the power goes out they can't heat their homes or cook meals or even buy gasoline for their cars, which means terrorists can ruin us simply by cutting off the power. Indoor plumbing is bad because when the toilet breaks or clogs people have no way to safely dispose of their own waste. Satellite communications are bad because if the satellites break down or the signal is blocked people are helpless and have no way of keeping in touch .....
 
2013-07-01 04:03:00 PM

Joelogon: Of course a newspaper columnist would say that. Newspaper readership and classified ad revenue would go back up.



Before, or after, the worldwide economic collapse?
 
2013-07-01 04:03:49 PM
By the same logic:

I would have repealed the locomotive in the early 1800's.
The telegraph in the late 1800's.
The telephone.
etc...

In other words, we can't move forward because some incredibly unlikely scenario may happen and destroy the world.
 
2013-07-01 04:06:23 PM

Goddess of Atheism: If I could, I would repeal the Internet. It is the technological marvel of the age, but it is not - as most people imagine - a symbol of progress. Just the opposite. We would be better off without it. I grant its astonishing capabilities: the instant access to vast amounts of information, the pleasures of YouTube and iTunes, the convenience of GPS and much more. But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies, and it brings with it a terrifying danger: cyberwar.  [snip]  So much depends on the Internet that its vulnerability to sabotage invites doomsday visions of the breakdown of order and trust.

By this idiotic logic, we should ban all technology. Electricity is bad because people get dependent on it, and then when the power goes out they can't heat their homes or cook meals or even buy gasoline for their cars, which means terrorists can ruin us simply by cutting off the power. Indoor plumbing is bad because when the toilet breaks or clogs people have no way to safely dispose of their own waste. Satellite communications are bad because if the satellites break down or the signal is blocked people are helpless and have no way of keeping in touch .....


But on the other hand, wouldn't it be nice if instead of bombing the crap out of another country to gain air superiority and cut off supply lines, isn't it great to have the internet so we can just clicky a few buttons and shut them down?  Bombs cost money!
 
2013-07-01 04:07:27 PM
But then we wouldn't have free porn sites like cliti.com.
 
2013-07-01 04:07:44 PM
I wonder what percentage of the people responding to this article were adults before the Internet came into being?
 
2013-07-01 04:08:57 PM
so, let's stop something good and beneficial because, occasionally, that good and beneficial think might not perform as well as promised.
 
2013-07-01 04:09:11 PM

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel


Yes, what would the world be like if we had not dropped some crap on the moon and a few other planets? Would the sky still be blue?
 
2013-07-01 04:09:21 PM
He's afraid cyber attacks will temporarily damage part of the internet. So he wants to get rid of the whole internet forever.

Thanks. That is what I got out of it as well and was wondering if he was really using an argument that stupid or if I was misreading it.
 
2013-07-01 04:09:42 PM

Goddess of Atheism: If I could, I would repeal the Internet. It is the technological marvel of the age, but it is not - as most people imagine - a symbol of progress. Just the opposite. We would be better off without it. I grant its astonishing capabilities: the instant access to vast amounts of information, the pleasures of YouTube and iTunes, the convenience of GPS and much more. But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies, and it brings with it a terrifying danger: cyberwar.  [snip]  So much depends on the Internet that its vulnerability to sabotage invites doomsday visions of the breakdown of order and trust.

By this idiotic logic, we should ban all technology. Electricity is bad because people get dependent on it, and then when the power goes out they can't heat their homes or cook meals or even buy gasoline for their cars, which means terrorists can ruin us simply by cutting off the power. Indoor plumbing is bad because when the toilet breaks or clogs people have no way to safely dispose of their own waste. Satellite communications are bad because if the satellites break down or the signal is blocked people are helpless and have no way of keeping in touch .....


Well maybe not electricity generally, but that ALternating Current stuff is downright dangerous, it uses voltage so high they could actually KILL a human being, or even an elephant I hear...
 
2013-07-01 04:10:28 PM
All that porn ain't gonna watch itself...
 
2013-07-01 04:12:08 PM
Movie night at this idiot's house...

www.hrrc.org
 
2013-07-01 04:14:44 PM
"Repeal"?

Only a columnist could think reality can be changed instantly with some well-placed authoritative words.  Just repeal the authority for it, and POOF!  Reality changes!  He says it like he's repealing agriculture.  Repealing the scientific method.  Repealing alphabets.

"Just say the magic words that will make the bad things go away!"

What are the odds that he's big on the State running people's lives?

"He received his bachelor's degree in 1967 from Harvard University, where he majored in government."

Naturally.
 
2013-07-01 04:14:45 PM
FTA: I grant its astonishing capabilities: the instant access to vast amounts of information, the pleasures of YouTube and iTunes, the convenience of GPS and much more.

I stopped reading right there. If you have no idea that GPS is not part of, nor facilitated by the internet, then you have lost a lot of credibility.
 
2013-07-01 04:16:28 PM
considering I cannot remember my wife's phone number nor anyone elses, he may have a point.
 
2013-07-01 04:20:29 PM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: The world was a better place when morons like Bill Maher and Giraldo Rivera had smaller stages.  Just sayin'....


It was also a better place when people spelled names correctly.
 
2013-07-01 04:21:54 PM

hitlersbrain: sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel

Yes, what would the world be like if we had not dropped some crap on the moon and a few other planets? Would the sky still be blue?


There's these new things called "satellites."
You may want to look into what they are used for.
 
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