If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Washington Post)   "If I could, I would repeal the Internet. It is the technological marvel of the age, but it is not - as most people imagine - a symbol of progress. Just the opposite. We would be better off without it"   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 147
    More: Silly, internet, repeal, social impact, symbols, Defense Science Board, chief security officer  
•       •       •

6820 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Jul 2013 at 3:16 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



147 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-07-01 02:38:50 PM  
Of course a newspaper columnist would say that. Newspaper readership and classified ad revenue would go back up.
 
2013-07-01 02:43:27 PM  
But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.
 
2013-07-01 02:52:11 PM  

exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.


Maybe he could use the googles, save some time...
 
2013-07-01 03:19:07 PM  
It certainly does make for a nice means to propel falsehoods around the globe before the truth has a chance to get its socks on.
 
2013-07-01 03:19:24 PM  
Back when people paid attention to newspaper columnists...
 
2013-07-01 03:19:28 PM  

sno man: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Maybe he could use the googles, save some time...


he has to be at the gym in 26 minutes
 
2013-07-01 03:19:43 PM  
fcdn.mtbr.com
 
2013-07-01 03:20:01 PM  
This seems remarkably like "old man yells at cloud" material to me.

"Cyber attacks are gonna get you!"  No one outside the IT professions should even be allowed to publish one word about hackers, because they're going to wrong.
 
2013-07-01 03:20:30 PM  

gameshowhost: It certainly does make for a nice means to propel falsehoods around the globe before the truth has a chance to get its socks on.


yeah but we have Fox News and Rush Limbaugh for that.
 
2013-07-01 03:20:33 PM  

gameshowhost: It certainly does make for a nice means to propel falsehoods around the globe before the truth has a chance to get its socks on.


It is also is a great way to reveal the truth, if you don't have to have it RIGHTTHEFARKNOW!
 
2013-07-01 03:21:37 PM  
The world was a better place when morons like Bill Maher and Giraldo Rivera had smaller stages.  Just sayin'....
 
2013-07-01 03:21:43 PM  
This printing press thing ain't all it's cracked up to be, said the scribe.
 
2013-07-01 03:22:25 PM  
But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

I guess no one told him about the porn.
 
2013-07-01 03:22:52 PM  

Lt. Cheese Weasel: The world was a better place when morons like Bill Maher and Giraldo Rivera had smaller stages.  Just sayin'....


they had shows on major tv networks.
 
2013-07-01 03:24:03 PM  
That was one of the most poorly thought-out articles that I've seen in at least the past year. Also, I'm admittedly heavily biased.

//My job doesn't exist without the internet.I like money.
 
2013-07-01 03:24:39 PM  
the Y2K phenomenon in 2000 (the date change was allegedly going to disable many computer chips)

*stab stab stab stab*
 
2013-07-01 03:24:54 PM  
Wait till he finds out about the horseless carriages.
 
2013-07-01 03:25:05 PM  

exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.


Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.
 
2013-07-01 03:25:18 PM  
If spending 6 hours every Saturday looking at pictures of lolcats is useless, well then, I guess I'm just useless, Mr. High and Mighty reporter.
 
2013-07-01 03:25:40 PM  
If I could turn back time, If I could find a way.
 
2013-07-01 03:25:51 PM  
What has GPS got to do with the Internet?
 
2013-07-01 03:26:29 PM  

Hobodeluxe: Lt. Cheese Weasel: The world was a better place when morons like Bill Maher and Giraldo Rivera had smaller stages.  Just sayin'....

they had shows on major tv networks.


No, you!
 
2013-07-01 03:26:34 PM  
I remember that the guy who invented the postage stamp bemoaned his lack of foresight because it meant unbetrothed girls could send letters to unapprovable scoundrels without being seen in line at the post office.

Onion, belt. Damned clouds. Behold the wonders of asbestos.
 
2013-07-01 03:26:45 PM  
Idiot writes an opinion piece.  The Washington Post publishes it.
 
2013-07-01 03:26:53 PM  
People who don't understand things really shouldn't be writing essays on them, that's how stupid is made.
 
2013-07-01 03:27:00 PM  
Imagine Fark without the Internet. I guess it would be a newsletter.
 
2013-07-01 03:27:06 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.


Space Travel
 
2013-07-01 03:27:17 PM  
'e's a witch!  Burn him!
 
2013-07-01 03:27:24 PM  
I actually was saying something similar this weekend (and I work for a tech company). - this was after I was driving by a location near my first house that used to house a travel agency that must have closed years ago (priceline, hotels.com, etc) and then thought about all the other b&m stores that are going away in retail, etc.

We are getting things easier as we can do almost everything on line - but it helps consolidate wealth, takes money from local economies, takes jobs away, people get fatter because they don't have to leave their house if they don't want to (especially if they work virtually) - this is all obviously not due to tech and the internet - but it is a factor. Soon we will all be Wal-E characters, but I don't think the robots will be so nice.

Life moves on, it is what it is, and I actually have a good career because of tech and SaaS - but whatever.
 
2013-07-01 03:28:39 PM  
That makes sense, his industry wouldn't be the dinosaur it is if it weren't for the internet.
 
2013-07-01 03:28:47 PM  
"If I could, I would repeal the Internet"

stoppedreadingthere.jpg
 
2013-07-01 03:29:01 PM  

snailbarf: [fcdn.mtbr.com image 265x199]


indeed
 
2013-07-01 03:29:12 PM  
Drew wouldn't be better off.  He'd need a real job.
 
2013-07-01 03:29:21 PM  
The internet provides information to people for free that they should pay for. One day universities are going to be as sorry as the newspapers.
 
2013-07-01 03:29:52 PM  

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel


GREAT.  Now we're gonna have THAT argument here.
 
2013-07-01 03:30:25 PM  
If we just got rid of printing presses, life would be so much simpler.  What have books ever done for us anyways?
 
2013-07-01 03:31:00 PM  
Shorter version: Old Man Yells at Cloud
 
2013-07-01 03:31:07 PM  

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel


LOL.

What did that transform, and for who?
 
2013-07-01 03:31:59 PM  
WRONG! I am way smarter because of the internet.

It's likely that I know more than just about anyone who existed before 1900 at least.
 
2013-07-01 03:32:09 PM  
I read your article on the internet. With no internet, I wouldn't have seen your article, Mr. Yelling-at-clouds Guy. What do you think of THAT, smart guy?
 
2013-07-01 03:34:10 PM  
Quantum Apostrophe:
sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel

LOL.

What did that transform, and for who?


my god man... TANG!!!
 
2013-07-01 03:35:30 PM  
We'd get over it
 
2013-07-01 03:35:34 PM  

Joelogon: Of course a newspaper columnist would say that. Newspaper readership and classified ad revenue would go back up.


The Uni-bomber's got a column now? Cool.
 
2013-07-01 03:35:37 PM  
That's not how the song goes AT ALL. "desperation, dislocation, separation.. Let it go"
 
2013-07-01 03:36:02 PM  

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe:
sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel

LOL.

What did that transform, and for who?

my god man... TANG!!!


Don't forget Velcro and Teflon.
 
2013-07-01 03:36:09 PM  
Things would be just fine if we stopped at 1200 baud modems and just had NTIS.....
 
2013-07-01 03:36:46 PM  

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel


thebubble.com.ar
 
2013-07-01 03:37:14 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.


You need more coffee.
 
2013-07-01 03:37:53 PM  
I think the only problem is sometimes you have to sift through a pile of crap to find that gold nugget you were looking for. This guy should go back to polishing his buggy whip collection and listening to his vintage 8 track tapes.
 
2013-07-01 03:38:34 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel

LOL.

What did that transform, and for who?


A truck. Into Maximus Whatsis. For the Decepticons, and that guy that swings with monkeys. Sheesh. Keep up...
 
2013-07-01 03:38:41 PM  
He's afraid cyber attacks will temporarily damage part of the internet. So he wants to get rid of the whole internet forever.

I wonder if he's worried about getting the flu this winter. If so, I have a foolproof suggestion for him:

img2.timeinc.net
 
2013-07-01 03:38:53 PM  
The invention of the telephone brought us bomb threats.
The invention of the wheel brought us tanks.
The invention of fire-making brought us, er, fires....

/I got nothing
 
2013-07-01 03:38:55 PM  
Back in the 80s there was a major update to the export technologies laws in the US. Turns out the Russians were undertaking a campaign of industrial espionage and this was the response but the reason for it wasn't published at the time so many heads were scratching in the tech and scientific press. I remember there was something about it in OMNI every other issue. (Yes, I'm old.)

Looks like the ChiComs are doing the same thing. Translation: they cannot innovate themselves (go figure, in a command economy where political orthodoxy is rewarded and free thought punished -- really?) so they're resorting to stealing.
 
2013-07-01 03:40:19 PM  
So this guy thinks Live Free or Die Hard was a documentary?
 
2013-07-01 03:40:52 PM  
I heard a fascinating Ted Talk recently about how the entire educational system has been basically rendered obsolete by the Internet.  The premise was that the educational system, as it exists today, was essentially created to churn out cogs in the "human computer" necessary to run and maintian the British Empire,  As such it focused on memorization of large quantitites of facts, the ability to do basic arithmentic in your head quickly, and to be able to write legibly and efficently.

Now that the collective human computer that ran the empire has been replaced with actual computers, and to a large extent the network of computers we call the internet, what real utilityis there to memorizing large quantities of facts, when you can almost always retrieve those same facts at a moment's notice? Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving  than it is to simply memorize it?
 
2013-07-01 03:40:55 PM  
Why in the flaming fark would you want to have an internet-enabled missile?

"AGM-65D Says: About to go off-target into an orphanage! #YOLO (👍 like this)"
 
2013-07-01 03:40:58 PM  

gameshowhost: It certainly does make for a nice means to propel falsehoods around the globe before the truth has a chance to get its socks on.


it is a truth that must be protected by lies
 
2013-07-01 03:41:40 PM  

Carousel Beast: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

You need more coffee.


If you can't figure that out by yourself, no wonder you're a Space Nutter. You have the attention span of a gnat.
 
2013-07-01 03:42:10 PM  
This guy does not comprehend 1/100th of what the internet does, and that's a fairly conservative estimate.
 
2013-07-01 03:42:11 PM  
I got to "..the convenience of GPS.." and realized he thought that GPS was part of the internet and I stopped right there.  Too many stories to read to read a knuckle dragging, mouth breathing, waste of DNA.  Robert J. Samuelson, you sir are an idiot.
 
2013-07-01 03:43:44 PM  
Article written by Bizarro Thomas Friedman.
 
2013-07-01 03:45:26 PM  
The internet allows the ownership class to extract wealth from the serfs faster.
 
2013-07-01 03:45:51 PM  
I was gonna comment on how ridiculous this is but I would rather look at cute cats on Reddit, save 2,000 pornographic images to my hard drive using an automated Firefox extension, and read Gwyneth Paltrow's Twitter and I forgot what I was going to say but ROFLMAO U mad bro?
 
2013-07-01 03:45:58 PM  
The internet is not a problem.  How people use the internet is the problem.  He cites the US's defense system's vulnerabilities.  It's not the internet's fault that our government and their trillions in defense spending didn't think that opening their most sensitive information to remote access utilizing generic platforms is the internet's fault?  It's not even a hacker's fault.  If you ask me, they're practically begging to be hacked.  Guys, take a couple cool billion of the taxdollars you have but brun and take your shiat offline until you come up with a better, never used anywhere else, extra encrypted and more secure structure with strict and specific audits and corrections on who can acess your information.
 
2013-07-01 03:47:48 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: The internet allows the ownership class to extract wealth from the serfs faster.


It provides the copious stream of noise and distraction to create pliable sheep that don't even think they're serfs.
 
2013-07-01 03:48:09 PM  
the convenience of GPS

Internet. GPS. Wat.

cyberwar
power grids, pipelines, communication and financial systems, business record-keeping and supply-chain operations, railroads and airlines, databases of all types (from hospitals to government agencies)


Ok, but if people stop putting things on the internet that don't belong there... And if classified systems had their other connections to the outside world (peripheral busses, CD/DVD writable drives, jacks of all kinds) removed or atleast locked down...

In the mid-1980s, most of these systems were self-contained. They relied on dedicated phone lines and private communications networks. They were hard to infiltrate.

My ass. They were hard to find and hard to understand, but then once you did there was basically no security. Because no one bothered to test anything and anyone reporting an "open door" into a system was treated with hostility and suspicion. You were more likely to be in trouble and the problem was more likely to be left hanging open.

Since then, many systems switched to the Internet. The architects of these conversions apparently underestimated the risk of sabotage.

It's all been done stupidly, certainly. See my above "start pulling cables and disconnecting things" idea. Really why does "internet" get read as "the internet, which all things must necessarily be connected to like a giant swallowing monster"?

As yet, there has been little. One publicized incident occurred in 2012 when hostile software ("malware") infected an estimated 30,000 computers of Aramco, Saudi Arabia's oil company. Business operations suffered, but oil production and delivery continued.

You're forgetting that anything truly bad gets swept under the rug, for reasons of insurance rates and lost customers and lost investors and so on.

What I'm getting at is, yes, obviously the internet has brought all kinds of trouble. But that's not intrinsic to the internet itself: Hire network administrators with brains, pay them what they're worth, and this all gets easier.
 
2013-07-01 03:49:07 PM  
I hates the interwebs
www.washingtonpost.com
 
2013-07-01 03:51:53 PM  
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed.

i275.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-01 03:52:07 PM  
Too late...

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-01 03:52:57 PM  

Magorn: I heard a fascinating Ted Talk recently about how the entire educational system has been basically rendered obsolete by the Internet.  The premise was that the educational system, as it exists today, was essentially created to churn out cogs in the "human computer" necessary to run and maintian the British Empire,  As such it focused on memorization of large quantitites of facts, the ability to do basic arithmentic in your head quickly, and to be able to write legibly and efficently.

Now that the collective human computer that ran the empire has been replaced with actual computers, and to a large extent the network of computers we call the internet, what real utilityis there to memorizing large quantities of facts, when you can almost always retrieve those same facts at a moment's notice? Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving  than it is to simply memorize it?


I haven't been to a doctor's visit in about 5 years without a doctor referring to their computers for diagnosis.  The memorization portion of Med School is going to be redundant.  The practical /physical application of care unto patients will remain.  Until the robots take over.
 
2013-07-01 03:53:10 PM  
Those damn kids need to get their internet off my lawn.
 
2013-07-01 03:53:14 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Carousel Beast: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

You need more coffee.

If you can't figure that out by yourself, no wonder you're a Space Nutter. You have the attention span of a gnat.


Words have meanings, dearie. And indoor plumbing was iterative, not transformative. You have some terrific examples on there, don't get me wrong, which is why I didn't resort to the normal ad hominem you usually deserve. Hell, you seem like a pretty good guy, despite your odd technological fetishes, but you should really work on not being a douche 95% of the time.

/If 9 out of 10 people disagree with you, odds are you're the one that's wrong.
 
2013-07-01 03:53:39 PM  
Dear cloud-yelling article writer person:
OK look bud, these guys said the same thing 40 years ago and they were one HELL of a lot more entertaining than you.
So just. shut. up.
www.themusicslut.com
 
2013-07-01 03:53:53 PM  

p the boiler: We are getting things easier as we can do almost everything on line - but it helps consolidate wealth, takes money from local economies, takes jobs away,


That's only partially correct. What the internet has done is created a more efficient system. It's delivering goods without involving as many middlemen. While this hurts some local businesses, it helps others. Even a business as monolithic as Amazon adds something to the local economies of the cities where its customers live. It also subtracts something.

If you're running the bookstore in town, you probably don't like Amazon. If you own the UPS franchise, you do- except when demand grows to the point where you have to buy a new truck and hire another driver. Of course, your loss there is the truck-selling-guy's gain...

There are simply some businesses where it doesn't make sense for every little town to have a b&m presence. We'll keep correcting until we reach something close to the proper balance.
 
2013-07-01 03:54:10 PM  
And take porn watching back to the stone age?  The hell you say!!!!!
 
2013-07-01 03:54:17 PM  
www.washingtonpost.comIf I could, I would repeal the Internet and bring us all back to the days when a mustache was a sign of being manly, not "ironic."
 
2013-07-01 03:54:54 PM  
As someone who has won the internets right here on this very site, I refuse to give it back!
 
2013-07-01 03:54:57 PM  
This reminds me why I never read the Opinion page. The fark do I care what people think? I'm more interested in the actual, you know, news section of the newspaper. (And the comics, of course.)
 
2013-07-01 03:55:01 PM  
For those foretelling the death of education due to the Internet:

Please remember that the hallmark of a GOOD education is not that it provides facts, but that it contextualizes facts.  Google can, indeed, tell you when Columbus crossed the Atlantic.  And Wikipedia might be able to tell you a lot about his life.  But if you want a good and complete answer to why he crossed then (and not 10 years earlier or later), then you need to understand the Moorish occupation of Spain, its recapture by Christians, the political competition between Spain, Portugal, and Italy for the favor of the Vatican, the rising demand for exotic goods caused by the slow uptick in discretionary spending money among the small landowners in Europe and Britain, the problems posed by the Venetian monopoly on the Silk Road, and on, and on, and on.

I'm not aware of any website, or series of them, that does anything approaching a good job of weaving these sorts of webs of knowledge together for you.  The Columbus Wiki certainly isn't going to give you much of a start.  The teacher is the synthasizer of knowledge, pulling disparate threads together in order to create a meaningful tableau of knowledge.  The web isn't going to replace that any time soon.  And the first few websites/applications that start to do even a passable job of that aren't going to be free.  They'll be competitively priced with what they're replacing.
 
2013-07-01 03:56:53 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.


The Thermos.
 
2013-07-01 03:57:27 PM  

Carousel Beast: Words have meanings, dearie. And indoor plumbing was iterative, not transformative.


Really? Really???

Anyways, I hope your Musk Mars Condo (TM) doesn't have an outhouse, iterative or not, snookums honey-pie.
 
2013-07-01 03:57:52 PM  
Not green enough for you Al?

/DNRTFA
 
2013-07-01 03:59:28 PM  

Uberunder: For those foretelling the death of education due to the Internet:

Please remember that the hallmark of a GOOD education is not that it provides facts, but that it contextualizes facts.  Google can, indeed, tell you when Columbus crossed the Atlantic.  And Wikipedia might be able to tell you a lot about his life.  But if you want a good and complete answer to why he crossed then (and not 10 years earlier or later), then you need to understand the Moorish occupation of Spain, its recapture by Christians, the political competition between Spain, Portugal, and Italy for the favor of the Vatican, the rising demand for exotic goods caused by the slow uptick in discretionary spending money among the small landowners in Europe and Britain, the problems posed by the Venetian monopoly on the Silk Road, and on, and on, and on.

I'm not aware of any website, or series of them, that does anything approaching a good job of weaving these sorts of webs of knowledge together for you.  The Columbus Wiki certainly isn't going to give you much of a start.  The teacher is the synthasizer of knowledge, pulling disparate threads together in order to create a meaningful tableau of knowledge.  The web isn't going to replace that any time soon.  And the first few websites/applications that start to do even a passable job of that aren't going to be free.  They'll be competitively priced with what they're replacing.


Christopher Columbus directed the Harry Potter movies, Poindexter.
 
2013-07-01 04:00:38 PM  
If I could, I would repeal the Internet. It is the technological marvel of the age, but it is not - as most people imagine - a symbol of progress. Just the opposite. We would be better off without it. I grant its astonishing capabilities: the instant access to vast amounts of information, the pleasures of YouTube and iTunes, the convenience of GPS and much more. But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies, and it brings with it a terrifying danger: cyberwar.  [snip]  So much depends on the Internet that its vulnerability to sabotage invites doomsday visions of the breakdown of order and trust.

By this idiotic logic, we should ban all technology. Electricity is bad because people get dependent on it, and then when the power goes out they can't heat their homes or cook meals or even buy gasoline for their cars, which means terrorists can ruin us simply by cutting off the power. Indoor plumbing is bad because when the toilet breaks or clogs people have no way to safely dispose of their own waste. Satellite communications are bad because if the satellites break down or the signal is blocked people are helpless and have no way of keeping in touch .....
 
2013-07-01 04:03:00 PM  

Joelogon: Of course a newspaper columnist would say that. Newspaper readership and classified ad revenue would go back up.



Before, or after, the worldwide economic collapse?
 
2013-07-01 04:03:49 PM  
By the same logic:

I would have repealed the locomotive in the early 1800's.
The telegraph in the late 1800's.
The telephone.
etc...

In other words, we can't move forward because some incredibly unlikely scenario may happen and destroy the world.
 
2013-07-01 04:06:23 PM  

Goddess of Atheism: If I could, I would repeal the Internet. It is the technological marvel of the age, but it is not - as most people imagine - a symbol of progress. Just the opposite. We would be better off without it. I grant its astonishing capabilities: the instant access to vast amounts of information, the pleasures of YouTube and iTunes, the convenience of GPS and much more. But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies, and it brings with it a terrifying danger: cyberwar.  [snip]  So much depends on the Internet that its vulnerability to sabotage invites doomsday visions of the breakdown of order and trust.

By this idiotic logic, we should ban all technology. Electricity is bad because people get dependent on it, and then when the power goes out they can't heat their homes or cook meals or even buy gasoline for their cars, which means terrorists can ruin us simply by cutting off the power. Indoor plumbing is bad because when the toilet breaks or clogs people have no way to safely dispose of their own waste. Satellite communications are bad because if the satellites break down or the signal is blocked people are helpless and have no way of keeping in touch .....


But on the other hand, wouldn't it be nice if instead of bombing the crap out of another country to gain air superiority and cut off supply lines, isn't it great to have the internet so we can just clicky a few buttons and shut them down?  Bombs cost money!
 
2013-07-01 04:07:27 PM  
But then we wouldn't have free porn sites like cliti.com.
 
2013-07-01 04:07:44 PM  
I wonder what percentage of the people responding to this article were adults before the Internet came into being?
 
2013-07-01 04:08:57 PM  
so, let's stop something good and beneficial because, occasionally, that good and beneficial think might not perform as well as promised.
 
2013-07-01 04:09:11 PM  

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel


Yes, what would the world be like if we had not dropped some crap on the moon and a few other planets? Would the sky still be blue?
 
2013-07-01 04:09:21 PM  
He's afraid cyber attacks will temporarily damage part of the internet. So he wants to get rid of the whole internet forever.

Thanks. That is what I got out of it as well and was wondering if he was really using an argument that stupid or if I was misreading it.
 
2013-07-01 04:09:42 PM  

Goddess of Atheism: If I could, I would repeal the Internet. It is the technological marvel of the age, but it is not - as most people imagine - a symbol of progress. Just the opposite. We would be better off without it. I grant its astonishing capabilities: the instant access to vast amounts of information, the pleasures of YouTube and iTunes, the convenience of GPS and much more. But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies, and it brings with it a terrifying danger: cyberwar.  [snip]  So much depends on the Internet that its vulnerability to sabotage invites doomsday visions of the breakdown of order and trust.

By this idiotic logic, we should ban all technology. Electricity is bad because people get dependent on it, and then when the power goes out they can't heat their homes or cook meals or even buy gasoline for their cars, which means terrorists can ruin us simply by cutting off the power. Indoor plumbing is bad because when the toilet breaks or clogs people have no way to safely dispose of their own waste. Satellite communications are bad because if the satellites break down or the signal is blocked people are helpless and have no way of keeping in touch .....


Well maybe not electricity generally, but that ALternating Current stuff is downright dangerous, it uses voltage so high they could actually KILL a human being, or even an elephant I hear...
 
2013-07-01 04:10:28 PM  
All that porn ain't gonna watch itself...
 
2013-07-01 04:12:08 PM  
Movie night at this idiot's house...

www.hrrc.org
 
2013-07-01 04:14:44 PM  
"Repeal"?

Only a columnist could think reality can be changed instantly with some well-placed authoritative words.  Just repeal the authority for it, and POOF!  Reality changes!  He says it like he's repealing agriculture.  Repealing the scientific method.  Repealing alphabets.

"Just say the magic words that will make the bad things go away!"

What are the odds that he's big on the State running people's lives?

"He received his bachelor's degree in 1967 from Harvard University, where he majored in government."

Naturally.
 
2013-07-01 04:14:45 PM  
FTA: I grant its astonishing capabilities: the instant access to vast amounts of information, the pleasures of YouTube and iTunes, the convenience of GPS and much more.

I stopped reading right there. If you have no idea that GPS is not part of, nor facilitated by the internet, then you have lost a lot of credibility.
 
2013-07-01 04:16:28 PM  
considering I cannot remember my wife's phone number nor anyone elses, he may have a point.
 
2013-07-01 04:20:29 PM  

Lt. Cheese Weasel: The world was a better place when morons like Bill Maher and Giraldo Rivera had smaller stages.  Just sayin'....


It was also a better place when people spelled names correctly.
 
2013-07-01 04:21:54 PM  

hitlersbrain: sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel

Yes, what would the world be like if we had not dropped some crap on the moon and a few other planets? Would the sky still be blue?


There's these new things called "satellites."
You may want to look into what they are used for.
 
2013-07-01 04:22:27 PM  

Joelogon: Of course a newspaper columnist would say that. Newspaper readership and classified ad revenue would go back up.


I have a feeling it has less to do with that, and more to do with, "I'm a crotchety old man who is scared of my own kitchen!!!!!"
 
2013-07-01 04:24:17 PM  

Magorn: I heard a fascinating Ted Talk recently about how the entire educational system has been basically rendered obsolete by the Internet.  The premise was that the educational system, as it exists today, was essentially created to churn out cogs in the "human computer" necessary to run and maintian the British Empire,  As such it focused on memorization of large quantitites of facts, the ability to do basic arithmentic in your head quickly, and to be able to write legibly and efficently.

Now that the collective human computer that ran the empire has been replaced with actual computers, and to a large extent the network of computers we call the internet, what real utilityis there to memorizing large quantities of facts, when you can almost always retrieve those same facts at a moment's notice? Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving  than it is to simply memorize it?


Knowing how to retrieve AND critically sort authoritative information from the sea of garbage.  Many folks don't refine the second part, we should be teaching more of that at an earlier level.  Still, does being good at these skills really replace the need to 'know' a large set of operational data?

I disagree with the idea that we have turned our schooling system obsolete.  Even if one grants the idea that the system was designed to turn out little human cogs, the most important thing being taught is how to socialize in groups.  We can already see attention to managing ones' online presence happening.  Ultimately though we are social creatures that in the foreseeable future will have a primary need to learn how to interact with others face to face and in groups.

Are we really smarter because of the net?  Doing math without a calculator used to be much more common, now even those who learned to do high school math without calculators forget from disuse.  Making intuitive leaps is dependent on having a ready set of data memorized.  In some ways I would argue that there is more derivative work that comes from this technology than original, and that IS a big loss.  I agree that there is too much focus on the benefits of the net as a replacement for traditional forms of scholastics, but 'I would repeal the interwebs if I could' isn't helping the discussion and the author comes across as alarmist and misinformed.  He probably spends too much time online.
 
2013-07-01 04:24:29 PM  

hitlersbrain: Yes, what would the world be like if we had not dropped some crap on the moon and a few other planets? Would the sky still be blue?


You anti-technology caveman Luddite! Don't you see? We wouldn't have computers if it wasn't for NASA!

There were no scientists or engineers prior to 1957!

After Yuri Gagarin stole the Promethean fire from the skies and brought wisdom to the planet, we finally started our technological progress!

blatz514: Movie night at this idiot's house...

[www.hrrc.org image 412x250]


profile-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-07-01 04:24:30 PM  

hitlersbrain: sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel

Yes, what would the world be like if we had not dropped some crap on the moon and a few other planets? Would the sky still be blue?


I suppose you could make an argument for the space race defusing the arms race and being the pressure valve for the cold war.  Or I could just have been poking Q A with a stick.
 
2013-07-01 04:25:47 PM  

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe:
sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel

LOL.

What did that transform, and for who?

my god man... TANG!!!


Every once in a while I take people off of "ignore" to see if perhaps they've finally come up with something new or intelligent to contribute.

Nearly as often I am gravely disappointed.
 
2013-07-01 04:26:47 PM  

Madbassist1: considering I cannot remember my wife's phone number nor anyone elses, he may have a point.


Do you search the internet for her phone number each time?
 
2013-07-01 04:27:24 PM  

Tillmaster: What has GPS got to do with the Internet?


It, too, cannot be determined using an IBM Selectric.
 
2013-07-01 04:28:53 PM  
Did anyone click through to read the bio on this guy? He appears to be a college dropout who has written an "economics" column.

But he saw a router once, so he's an expert on the internet apparently.
 
2013-07-01 04:30:47 PM  

Magorn: I heard a fascinating Ted Talk recently about how the entire educational system has been basically rendered obsolete by the Internet.  The premise was that the educational system, as it exists today, was essentially created to churn out cogs in the "human computer" necessary to run and maintian the British Empire,  As such it focused on memorization of large quantitites of facts, the ability to do basic arithmentic in your head quickly, and to be able to write legibly and efficently.

Now that the collective human computer that ran the empire has been replaced with actual computers, and to a large extent the network of computers we call the internet, what real utilityis there to memorizing large quantities of facts, when you can almost always retrieve those same facts at a moment's notice? Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving  than it is to simply memorize it?


Ability to make connections between disparate facts in your head.  That is why it is important to actually know facts.
 
2013-07-01 04:30:49 PM  

sno man: I suppose you could make an argument for the space race defusing the arms race and being the pressure valve for the cold war. Or I could just have been poking Q A with a stick.


I wish you'd refrain; he leaks when you do that and "ignore" isn't up to the task.
 
2013-07-01 04:37:15 PM  
Poor Robert J. Samuelsonwww.washingtonpost.com Opinion Writer, this whole thread hates you. Don't worry though - the old man will still be your friend. t.qkme.me
 
2013-07-01 04:40:12 PM  
It's amusing that the asshole is biatching about the internet, but the only reason any of us can read his stupid ramblings is because of the internet.

/insert series of tubes comment here.
//insert "Definition of Luddite" comment here.
 
2013-07-01 04:42:40 PM  
Technology, everything from the pointy stick to the supercomputer, is morally neutral - it's what people choose to do technology that matters.

Clearly the problem in the world today is not one of too much or too little technology - it's that people suck.  We just need to get better people.
 
2013-07-01 04:52:08 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: The internet allows the ownership class to extract wealth from the serfs faster.


I'd say serfs existing has always allowed for that.
 
2013-07-01 04:52:33 PM  
Video killed the radio star.
 
2013-07-01 04:53:33 PM  

robbiex0r: This guy does not comprehend 1/100th of what the internet does, and that's a fairly conservative estimate.


So he comprehends 99% of what the internet does, right?
 
2013-07-01 04:53:48 PM  

Phinn: Only a columnist Harvard graduate could think reality can be changed instantly with some well-placed authoritative words.  Just repeal the authority for it, and POOF!  Reality changes!


FTFY.

/Harvard graduates, irreversibly farking up the country since the 18th Century.
 
2013-07-01 04:54:36 PM  
Nostalgia aside, there's not much point in reliving the 80s and early 90s - The world without the net/
 
2013-07-01 04:56:22 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: Phinn: Only a columnist Harvard graduate could think reality can be changed instantly with some well-placed authoritative words.  Just repeal the authority for it, and POOF!  Reality changes!

FTFY.

/Harvard graduates, irreversibly farking up the country since the 18th Century.


Stereotype much?
 
2013-07-01 04:56:32 PM  
Arguing against the Internet is like arguing against gravity.  The quicker dissemination of information was going to happen.  It used to be libraries.  Now it's electronic.  The hardest thing to figure out is where this takes us next and whether we mature enough to use the connectivity, information and decision making aids in a coherent enough fashion to get there in one piece.  Flip a coin.  Can we still communicate well with each other? Text AND drive?
 
2013-07-01 04:56:48 PM  

Nana's Vibrator: Magorn: I heard a fascinating Ted Talk recently about how the entire educational system has been basically rendered obsolete by the Internet.  The premise was that the educational system, as it exists today, was essentially created to churn out cogs in the "human computer" necessary to run and maintian the British Empire,  As such it focused on memorization of large quantitites of facts, the ability to do basic arithmentic in your head quickly, and to be able to write legibly and efficently.

Now that the collective human computer that ran the empire has been replaced with actual computers, and to a large extent the network of computers we call the internet, what real utilityis there to memorizing large quantities of facts, when you can almost always retrieve those same facts at a moment's notice? Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving  than it is to simply memorize it?

I haven't been to a doctor's visit in about 5 years without a doctor referring to their computers for diagnosis.  The memorization portion of Med School is going to be redundant.  The practical /physical application of care unto patients will remain.  Until the robots take over.



Well played you two. These are the exact concepts that have driven me to radically change education in my classrooms. Turning the teacher position into a facilitator of information and discourse is critical to creating a better future. Problem is, no one in their right mind would EVER go into education when the personal education required to facilitate large group discussions is the same as the training and mindset required to run a multinational corporation. Hmmm, take pay that is less than a sanitation worker, or run a mulit-million dollar company.

You get what you pay for. If the states offered $100,000 a year entry level for teachers, they would have the best and the brightest in the world applying and would render the teachers union obsolete over night. In one year you could radically change the entire concept of public education.

Or just keep farking that chicken, whatever.
 
2013-07-01 05:27:17 PM  

AeAe: Idiot writes an opinion piece.  The Washington Post publishes it.


See how bad the internet is?! They'll let just anyone type something up and throw it out there!
 
2013-07-01 05:28:21 PM  
Dear Robert J. Samuelson,

How about you stop pretending that you understand the Internet and I won't pretend to be an oped writer. Deal?

RevMark

PS: You sound old.
 
2013-07-01 05:28:38 PM  

Magorn: I heard a fascinating Ted Talk recently about how the entire educational system has been basically rendered obsolete by the Internet. The premise was that the educational system, as it exists today, was essentially created to churn out cogs in the "human computer" necessary to run and maintian the British Empire, As such it focused on memorization of large quantitites of facts, the ability to do basic arithmentic in your head quickly, and to be able to write legibly and efficently.

Now that the collective human computer that ran the empire has been replaced with actual computers, and to a large extent the network of computers we call the internet, what real utilityis there to memorizing large quantities of facts, when you can almost always retrieve those same facts at a moment's notice? Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving than it is to simply memorize it?


the first paragraph are all things that needd to be learned before age 11
The last paragraph contains all the things that need to be learned after age 14.
Ages 12 and 13 are junior high school - all those kids need to be sent to an island ...

Seriously, are you not aware that - still - most of the human endeavour does not take place in cyberspace? Most of it takes place inside buman beings, and they need both sets of those facts.
 
2013-07-01 05:45:08 PM  

Carioca: robbiex0r: This guy does not comprehend 1/100th of what the internet does, and that's a fairly conservative estimate.

So he comprehends 99% of what the internet does, right?


dangit.
 
2013-07-01 05:51:49 PM  

probesport: If I could turn back time, If I could find a way.


Well, I have been putting time in a bottle for a while now.  But there never seems to be enough time to do the things you want to do, once you find them.
 
2013-07-01 05:52:57 PM  

PanicMan: Madbassist1: considering I cannot remember my wife's phone number nor anyone elses, he may have a point.

Do you search the internet for her phone number each time?


If you are unable to comprehend my point from the information already given, I'm not wasting any more time with you. Good day, sir.
 
2013-07-01 06:04:47 PM  
hey guys, he's right.
 
2013-07-01 06:04:48 PM  

elchupacabra: sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: exick: But the Internet's benefits are relatively modest compared with previous transformative technologies

Of which I would provide examples, but I'm pressed for time. Deadlines and such.

Electrification. Indoor plumbing. The Industrial Revolution. Internal combustion. Quantum physics. The transistor. Germ theory. Genetics.

Space Travel

GREAT.  Now we're gonna have THAT argument here.


And 15 minutes later, BOOM! there he is.
 
2013-07-01 06:07:31 PM  

Stephen_Falken: Dear cloud-yelling article writer person:
OK look bud, these guys said the same thing 40 years ago and they were one HELL of a lot more entertaining than you.
So just. shut. up.
[www.themusicslut.com image 850x637]


That's because if a problem came along, they knew that they must whip it.
 
2013-07-01 06:11:17 PM  
Greylight:Are we really smarter because of the net?

No.
imgs.xkcd.com
It just seems that way.
 
2013-07-01 06:17:57 PM  
You can't. F*ck off.

-Sincerely, The Internet
 
2013-07-01 06:29:32 PM  
FTFA "but probably Chinese "

FARK you, from me and my friends around me in China.
 
2013-07-01 06:31:03 PM  

Greylight: Doing math without a calculator used to be much more common, now even those who learned to do high school math without calculators forget from disuse.


Writing without a ballpoint pen used to be much more common, now even those who learned to fill (or earlier, cut) nibs in school forget from disuse.

Technology changes the way we do things, and even the things we do. If you see some detriment in the new system feel free to point it out. But simply noting that things have changed and the skills we consider important have changed not evidence that we need to continue teaching those old skills.
 
2013-07-01 06:40:58 PM  

dk47: Ability to make connections between disparate facts in your head.  That is why it is important to actually know facts.


Clearly knowing "things" is important if you want to understand them deeply.

But I'd argue that access to a near-line information system (things you don't know internally but can quickly find and use, like looking up a formula with Google) changes the nature of the things you need to memorize in order to do the same work, and that access to a wider range of data provides the ability to make connections that are not possible when you need to have all the information memorized (as it's simply not possible to memorize all of it).

Which is not so say there aren't downsides, just that there are also advantages, and the same old measurements and ways of thinking might not apply properly to the new techniques available with near-line data. For example, the amount of wheat most people produce in a year is near 0, and by old-timey standards we'd all be worthless citizens. But the world has changed and the way in which we contribute can no longer be accurately measured by our agricultural output alone.
 
2013-07-01 06:55:53 PM  

Carioca: robbiex0r: This guy does not comprehend 1/100th of what the internet does, and that's a fairly conservative estimate.

So he comprehends 99% of what the internet does, right?


www.broodingdetective.com
English does not work that way.
 
2013-07-01 07:37:25 PM  
I saw the name and the paper and said "ah, ha" nevermind.
 
2013-07-01 07:43:37 PM  

Astorix: I saw the name and the paper and said "ah, ha" nevermind.


Pretty much. Old man yells at clouds - only, in this case, the clouds store a significant percentage of man's collected knowledge, in a format that rendered the old man's format largely obsolete (hence his irrationality.)

Adapt or die, mustache boy. Adapt or die.
 
2013-07-01 08:57:39 PM  
Ooh yes, let's go back to the days of job hunting where you copy addresses out of a five-year-old guide to companies, type up a resume and cover letter on a typewriter, mail it out and hope the bimbo HRs or secretaries don't lose or misplace it, then follow up with a phone number no longer valid.
 
2013-07-01 09:04:24 PM  

Tillmaster: What has GPS got to do with the Internet?


they both run on some sort of electricity
 
2013-07-01 09:12:34 PM  

Magorn: Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving than it is to simply memorize it?


Counterpoint:  True evolution of thought doesn't come from access to facts, but an inherent knowledge and application of those facts. Scientific discovery centers around folks who have encyclopedic knowledge of minutae, and their ability to decipher the interactions between them.  Such intimacy with a subject does not occur by perusing a wikipedia entry,
 
2013-07-01 09:24:43 PM  
Hey Samuelson, your blog sucks!
 
2013-07-01 10:56:06 PM  

LarryDan43: The internet provides information to people for free that they should pay for. One day universities are going to be as sorry as the newspapers.


Information is free. Degrees and qualifications are not. This is what people always forget. When looking for employment, the issue is not what you know, but what you can prove you know, and that takes paperwork. Corporations are not going to take every single applicant who says "I know that" and run them through a bunch of tests to see if they actually do. Way too expensive, time consuming, and stupid. The internets are never going to be your teacher unless those lessons and that information can be certified, codified and on par with a formal course of study as recognized by educators and the state.

Would you trust a surgeon who had only read a "Surgery for Dummies" book, or worse, website (ugh) or are you going to look them up (med school, undergrad, residency, experience) along with the names on the fancy diplomas they always have prominently displayed on the wall? Hint: they have them on the wall for a reason.

I can see right now where some dumbass is citing freerepublic, FoxNews and "American Thinker" as thesis footnotes and sources... ugh x2.
 
2013-07-01 11:08:56 PM  
Time for your meds grandpa
 
2013-07-02 12:14:25 AM  
I thought Andy Rooney had died.
 
2013-07-02 09:11:04 AM  
Without the internet, 85% of Farkers would lose their entire life and group of "friends"
 
2013-07-02 10:22:34 AM  

Magorn: Now that the collective human computer that ran the empire has been replaced with actual computers, and to a large extent the network of computers we call the internet, what real utilityis there to memorizing large quantities of facts, when you can almost always retrieve those same facts at a moment's notice? Isn't it now more important to learn HOW to retrieve information, and discriminate the quality of information you are recieving  than it is to simply memorize it?


For the masses, yes. For all those scientists, engineers, physicians, &c, no. They need to have a huge amount of working knowledge and be able to find minute details quickly. If you want to add to society in a creative way, "I'll just look it up on wikipedia" will not do.
 
Displayed 147 of 147 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report