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(Buzzfeed)   Fifteen classic children's books banned in certain areas of the United States. Apparently, Winnie the Pooh is a Nazi and an insult to god since he's a talking animal   (buzzfeed.com) divider line 214
    More: Fail, Winnie-the-Pooh, Maurice Sendak, young girls, A.A. Milne, Diary of a Young Girl, United States, Oompa-Loompa, Green Egg  
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18764 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Jun 2013 at 12:11 AM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-30 08:40:39 PM

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: ruta: Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman:

That's basically where it came from.  Here's the "explanation" I found through some searching:

"Green Eggs and Ham, meanwhile, is a thinly disguised account of homosexual seduction. In this kiddie favorite, "Sam I Am" (that is, "Same As I Am") tries to persuade the narrator to "eat" green eggs and ham. Anyone who has traveled in the Spanish-speaking world knows what "eggs" are. The ham, of course, is a long, phallic sausage, perfect for "porking" someone. The protagonist repeatedly denies any interest in the offer, but Sam persists, proposing that he join him in any number of locations, positions, and kinky arrangements. ("Would you, could you, on a boat? Would you, could you, with a goat?") Finally, our hero gives in, just once-and discovers that he enjoys fellating breakfast after all. Sam has made a convert, and the legion of God-Fearing Heterosexuals is diminished by one.
  Actually, The Cat in the Hat leaves an odd aftertaste, with its closing admonition not to tell your parents what you've been up to. Read immediately after Green Eggs and Ham, the moral is clear."

If you didn't write that yourself and it wasn't written by someone else ironically, I'd say that person is so deep in the wardrobe that he's in a ham-handed Christian allegory that is not banned for its occult themes.

/Sexy, dirty, forbidden, thrusting, porking ham-hands.

I'm pretty sure it was intentionally written ironically. The source I got it from is here:  http://reason.com/archives/2002/09/26/ban-this-book


You really got to have a lot of gay on your mind to read all of that into Green Eggs and Ham.
 
2013-06-30 08:51:12 PM

100 Watt Walrus: TV's Vinnie: 100 Watt Walrus: TV's Vinnie: The Stealth Hippopotamus: I'm not a fan of banning books. But the Giving Tree needs to be burned and all records of its existence wiped off the face of the planet!

Let me guess. You have an Ayn Rand RealDoll in your closet, don't you?

Curiously, I just saw this in last week's Entertainment Weekly, and it made me curious: Is it just conservatives who try to ban books? I don't know of any incidents of liberals trying to ban books.

[i.imgur.com image 850x403]

helphelpwerebeingrepressed.jpg

To be fair, it's specifically christians who laughably cry oppression, not Randian socio-political dittoheads.


Not always.
 
2013-06-30 10:24:34 PM
Hmm...well, I've read all of those, own most of them and I've read probably half of them to my 4 year old little girl.  Guess I'm an unfit parent.

/Green Eggs and Ham promotes homosexuality??
//WTF about Brown Bear, Brown Bear
///we even own that one in Spanish
////Oso pardo, oso pardo, ¿que ves ahi?
 
2013-06-30 10:31:31 PM

NotARocketScientist: muck4doo: Anyone else have pancakes at Sambo's?

I remember going to Little Black Sambo's once as a kid while on vacation. It was a Denny's type place. They had a story book about an African kid named Sambo that detailed the kid outsmarting a tiger to avoid being eaten. At the time I didn't see it portraying blacks in a bad light, but I was about 8 at the time and it had not yet occurred to me that people would put effort into making other people look bad based on race.



I remember eating at one on the Oregon coast sometime around 1963.  It had a huge depiction of some black kid tricking a tiger into running around a palm tree until the tiger turned into butter.  The kid was dressed up like I would imagine someone from India would wear (my knowledge being gleaned from the Ripley's Believe It Or Not books my grandmother kept).
 
2013-06-30 10:39:16 PM

orbister: meanmutton: orbister: meanmutton: Because I choose not to use a word that would cause distress to my (biracial) nieces and some of my friends and co-workers

And the word is choose. Drew doesn't let us choose.

It's Drew's website, not ours.

Of course, although the healthy living he makes from this website does depend on the rest of us as unpaid content creators.

That said, I still find it simultaneously funny and depressing that a group of people who are generally cheerfully irreverent are so hung up on one word. Maybe it's a transatlantic thing.


Dude, you live in a country (the UK, for anyone who desn't check profiles)  that criminally prosecutes people for racial slurs.  Criminal frickin' prosecution that can result in prison time.  We just think the people who use it are asshats.

Who is hung up on what?
 
2013-06-30 10:42:49 PM

100 Watt Walrus: TV's Vinnie: The Stealth Hippopotamus: I'm not a fan of banning books. But the Giving Tree needs to be burned and all records of its existence wiped off the face of the planet!

Let me guess. You have an Ayn Rand RealDoll in your closet, don't you?

Curiously, I just saw this in last week's Entertainment Weekly, and it made me curious: Is it just conservatives who try to ban books? I don't know of any incidents of liberals trying to ban books.

[i.imgur.com image 850x403]


Huck Finn, for one.

That said, they tend to spend their censorship trying to censor political speech.
 
2013-07-01 12:15:28 AM

therecksays: therecksays: Banning books? Have we learned nothing for Footloose?

for = from

/facepalm


well, at least you didn't say form... that would mean you are cixelsyd.
 
2013-07-01 01:00:36 AM

Persnickety: R.P.M.: TV's Vinnie: The Stealth Hippopotamus: I'm not a fan of banning books. But the Giving Tree needs to be burned and all records of its existence wiped off the face of the planet!

Let me guess. You have an Ayn Rand RealDoll in your closet, don't you?

i haven't red Rand in a long time, but wasn't the tree following her belief to live the purpose of a tree?
 
not defending the book.  it was my brothers favorite , but i never liked how it ended.  just saying that Rand would say the tree did what it should have.  i could be way wrong. yay discussion!


Hmm.  Seems to me Rand would see the boy/man as analogous to worthless freeloaders in society who just always take and take while the tree would be well meaning liberals who try to satisfy them to make themselves feel better.  Note that it is always the tree that is happy.  The boy/man never is.  Such is the nature of entitlements.


ya, to be honest, the reasons you stated about the boy/man is reason i hated it.  just tired of people reading to much into a comment and then going full defcon 5 with come backs. a lot of things can be "read" however we want them.  just was trying to point that out.  and failed...=)
 
2013-07-01 01:05:28 AM
I have that "where's Waldo" jigsaw puzzle. BOOBIES!
 
2013-07-01 01:39:04 AM

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Yeah, I'm just saying that having a non-Christian character as one of the virtuous interracial-marrying heroes of one book, and a non-Christian as a virtuous man decreed worthy by Aslan himself in another book, and so on, ultimately isn't nearly as bad as it could've been. Lewis's belief is that ALL good faithful people are worthy of respect and can get to heaven, and that absolutely would not fly with some of the US fundamentalists I know.


It seemed to me that Lewis was saying something more specific and radical than "all good people can get to heaven." I don't have the book in front of me to get Aslan's exact quote to the noble Calormene, but it seemed to imply that anyone who lives a good life IS a Christian whether they know it or not, and anyone who does evil IS whatever we want to call Tash-worship an allegory for, whether they know it or not.
 
2013-07-01 04:08:04 AM

100 Watt Walrus: Curiously, I just saw this in last week's Entertainment Weekly, and it made me curious: Is it just conservatives who try to ban books? I don't know of any incidents of liberals trying to ban books.


Banning books is the opposite of being liberal. It's the conservatives and the PC crowd who ban books.
 
2013-07-01 04:14:08 AM
meanmutton: Huck Finn, for one.

That said, they tend to spend their censorship trying to censor political speech.


No, liberals don't ban books. You're talking about Political correctness. Political correctness isn't liberal; it's another form of intolerance.

If a white supremacist was invited to a public political debate, the politically correct would try to silence him/her or disrupt the event. Liberals would participate and meet the supremacist's arguments with counterarguments and actual facts.

Again; political correctness is not liberal.
 
2013-07-01 07:54:53 AM

StoPPeRmobile: WizardofToast: Why: All public libraries in Chicago the book because of its "ungodly" influence "for depicting women in strong leadership roles." In 1957, the Detroit Public Library banned the book for having "no value for children of today."

We could ban books for having no value to kids? May be needed for the Twilight series.

At least the Bible is full of tales for children.

One of my favorites.

22 Now as they were making their hearts merry, behold, the men of the city, certain sons of Belial, beset the house round about, and beat at the door, and spake to the master of the house, the old man, saying, Bring forth the man that came into thine house, that we may know him.

23 And the man, the master of the house, went out unto them, and said unto them, Nay, my brethren, nay, I pray you, do not so wickedly; seeing that this man is come into mine house, do not this folly.

24 Behold, here is my daughter a maiden, and his concubine; them I will bring out now, and humble ye them, and do with them what seemeth good unto you: but unto this man do not so vile a thing.

25 But the men would not hearken to him: so the man took his concubine, and brought her forth unto them; and they knew her, and abused her all the night until the morning: and when the day began to spring, they let her go.

26 Then came the woman in the dawning of the day, and fell down at the door of the man's house where her lord was, till it was light.

27 And her lord rose up in the morning, and opened the doors of the house, and went out to go his way: and, behold, the woman his concubine was fallen down at the door of the house, and her hands were upon the threshold.

28 And he said unto her, Up, and let us be going. But none answered. Then the man took her up upon an ass, and the man rose up, and gat him unto his place.

29 And when he was come into his house, he took a knife, and laid hold on his concubine, and divided her, together with her bones, into twelve pieces, and sent her into all the ...


It's even better when you understand what they mean by, "...know him".  Yes, that's exactly what it means.  There is a lot of knowing of people in the bible, come to think of it.
 
2013-07-01 10:58:59 AM

ghostfacekillahrabbit: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Yeah, I'm just saying that having a non-Christian character as one of the virtuous interracial-marrying heroes of one book, and a non-Christian as a virtuous man decreed worthy by Aslan himself in another book, and so on, ultimately isn't nearly as bad as it could've been. Lewis's belief is that ALL good faithful people are worthy of respect and can get to heaven, and that absolutely would not fly with some of the US fundamentalists I know.

It seemed to me that Lewis was saying something more specific and radical than "all good people can get to heaven." I don't have the book in front of me to get Aslan's exact quote to the noble Calormene, but it seemed to imply that anyone who lives a good life IS a Christian whether they know it or not, and anyone who does evil IS whatever we want to call Tash-worship an allegory for, whether they know it or not.


I think that's more or less right, but as backhanded as that may seem...it is beyond the pale, in the view of a lot of the Christians I've known, to suggest that a virtuous devout pagan is literally serving Christ and an asshole who's an avowed "Christian" is not and each will reap his afterlife rewards accordingly.

/not that kind of known
 
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