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(Huffington Post)   Meet the police officer with a photographic memory that can identify almost anyone   (huffingtonpost.com ) divider line
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8331 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Jun 2013 at 8:32 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-29 11:37:50 PM  

ajgeek: Isn't that particular trait a double edged sword?


I don't think it's in the original canon, but I remember a Sherlock Holmes story where the somewhat simple house keeper was actually a prodigious memory man who was feeding safe combinations to a burglar. The story ended with the memory man stumbling upon a vicious murder scene and regretting his memory because it was now full of blood and gore.
 
2013-06-29 11:43:13 PM  

Molavian: Fish in a Barrel: ...and his assistant: MC Clap Yo Handz.

[media.tumblr.com image 218x209]

Bravo!


Thank you.  And thank you!
 
2013-06-29 11:53:36 PM  

CruiserTwelve: fusillade762: So that's Jordan and I'm assuming at least one other person.

Assumptions don't count. Give me another example. C'mon, there's lots of them so it should be easy, right?


If they didn't even interview people who scored too high it IS safe to assume other people were also denied. He's just the only one who sued, so he's the only one who made the news. No one else is likely to sue now after his suit got slapped down, so you're not likely to hear about it.

But you can continue being deliberately dense if you like.
 
2013-06-30 12:02:32 AM  

fusillade762: CruiserTwelve: fusillade762: So that's Jordan and I'm assuming at least one other person.

Assumptions don't count. Give me another example. C'mon, there's lots of them so it should be easy, right?

If they didn't even interview people who scored too high it IS safe to assume other people were also denied. He's just the only one who sued, so he's the only one who made the news. No one else is likely to sue now after his suit got slapped down, so you're not likely to hear about it.

But you can continue being deliberately dense if you like.


Assumptions don't count. Unless you're the arresting officer.
 
2013-06-30 12:17:08 AM  
Now he just needs to team up with the Ghost Who Never Lies in order to remove all crime from his jurisdiction.

I'm curious to see if his photographic memory holds up in court proceedings, as if it can be legally recognized as more legitimate than any other testimony.
 
2013-06-30 12:41:43 AM  

CruiserTwelve: Digitalstrange: Surprised they hired him, a lot of police forces screen for people too smart to find interest in the work.

Really? Name two.


Here's two:
  
http://www.policeone.com/bizarre/articles/3467939-Cardboard-cop-cred it ed-with-collar-Recruit-too-smart-for-academy-class/

Complete with "The hiring board stated most law enforcement officers nation wide have an average IQ of between 98 and 105."
 
2013-06-30 01:03:24 AM  

Weatherkiss: Now he just needs to team up with the Ghost Who Never Lies in order to remove all crime from his jurisdiction.

I'm curious to see if his photographic memory holds up in court proceedings, as if it can be legally recognized as more legitimate than any other testimony.


testimony from *any* police officer or investigative agent is held to be more truthful than any other testimony as it is.  Just look at the "defendant says vs. cop says" on traffic tickets, etc.
 
2013-06-30 03:28:12 AM  
Nobody has mentioned that in England this guy isn't really a cop. This guy is more like a WalMart greeter for the police department. I don't know why he would be stopping anyone.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police_Community_Support_Officer
 
2013-06-30 04:55:32 AM  

fusillade762: If they didn't even interview people who scored too high it IS safe to assume other people were also denied. He's just the only one who sued, so he's the only one who made the news. No one else is likely to sue now after his suit got slapped down, so you're not likely to hear about it.

But you can continue being deliberately dense if you like.


So you have no second case and you're admittedly relying on an assumption.
 
2013-06-30 05:00:22 AM  

deffuse: Here's two:
  
http://www.policeone.com/bizarre/articles/3467939-Cardboard-cop-cred it ed-with-collar-Recruit-too-smart-for-academy-class/


Thank you. You're the first one to actually find a second case. So, do you think these two cases, about 17 years apart, support the statement that "a lot of police forces screen for people too smart to find interest in the work.?"
 
2013-06-30 06:04:50 AM  

CruiserTwelve: fusillade762: If they didn't even interview people who scored too high it IS safe to assume other people were also denied. He's just the only one who sued, so he's the only one who made the news. No one else is likely to sue now after his suit got slapped down, so you're not likely to hear about it.

But you can continue being deliberately dense if you like.

So you have no second case and you're admittedly relying on an assumption.


Yes, you're right. Only one person has EVER been excluded from a police force because they scored too high on an intelligence test, That's a reasonable assumption.
 
2013-06-30 06:11:45 AM  

fusillade762: CruiserTwelve: fusillade762: If they didn't even interview people who scored too high it IS safe to assume other people were also denied. He's just the only one who sued, so he's the only one who made the news. No one else is likely to sue now after his suit got slapped down, so you're not likely to hear about it.

But you can continue being deliberately dense if you like.

So you have no second case and you're admittedly relying on an assumption.

Yes, you're right. Only one person has EVER been excluded from a police force because they scored too high on an intelligence test, That's a reasonable assumption.


Shhh, it's cop math. Two's as high as it goes.
 
2013-06-30 06:42:18 AM  

CruiserTwelve: deffuse: Here's two:
  
http://www.policeone.com/bizarre/articles/3467939-Cardboard-cop-cred it ed-with-collar-Recruit-too-smart-for-academy-class/

Thank you. You're the first one to actually find a second case. So, do you think these two cases, about 17 years apart, support the statement that "a lot of police forces screen for people too smart to find interest in the work.?"


Cruiser twelve - those two cases exist. By existing they, by definition, support the proposition that police forces screen for people to make sure they won't get bored etc. Just like if you could find a statement by someone saying 'We don't screen for this' would support your position. Critical reasoning 101.
 
2013-06-30 07:35:06 AM  
But can he identify all the donuts that were in the box?
 
2013-06-30 08:12:24 AM  
But can he crash through a window whilst shooting both his guns?
 
2013-06-30 10:16:28 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-06-30 11:33:19 AM  

deffuse: Cruiser twelve - those two cases exist. By existing they, by definition, support the proposition that police forces screen for people to make sure they won't get bored etc. Just like if you could find a statement by someone saying 'We don't screen for this' would support your position. Critical reasoning 101.


The statement was "A lot of police forces screen for people..." Are two cases "a lot?"

My argument is that this is not a common practice as some would believe, in fact it's a very uncommon practice. Most police agencies do not screen out people with high IQ's, in fact they welcome them.
 
2013-06-30 02:23:38 PM  

Molavian: CruiserTwelve: Digitalstrange: Surprised they hired him, a lot of police forces screen for people too smart to find interest in the work.

Really? Name two.

You ever met a cop?  It's not like they're the sharpest tools in the shed.


Ill take sweeping generalizations for $1000, Alex...

Ive been a cop for over 20 years now and theres just as many brilliant officers as there are dumbshiats.  Someone better at statistics than I am can probably give you a breakdown...you know, cross section of the population and all that.
 
2013-06-30 02:31:05 PM  

Litterbox: Molavian: CruiserTwelve: Digitalstrange: Surprised they hired him, a lot of police forces screen for people too smart to find interest in the work.

Really? Name two.

You ever met a cop?  It's not like they're the sharpest tools in the shed.

Ill take sweeping generalizations for $1000, Alex...

Ive been a cop for over 20 years now and theres just as many brilliant officers as there are dumbshiats.  Someone better at statistics than I am can probably give you a breakdown...you know, cross section of the population and all that.


As far as statistics, what percentage of Fark stories involve cops as the protagonists of the tale?
 
2013-06-30 04:12:57 PM  

Litterbox: Molavian: CruiserTwelve: Digitalstrange: Surprised they hired him, a lot of police forces screen for people too smart to find interest in the work.

Really? Name two.

You ever met a cop?  It's not like they're the sharpest tools in the shed.

Ill take sweeping generalizations for $1000, Alex...

Ive been a cop for over 20 years now and theres just as many brilliant officers as there are dumbshiats.  Someone better at statistics than I am can probably give you a breakdown...you know, cross section of the population and all that.


Well, of course as I mentioned up thread the board said that the average IQ was between 98 and 105 - that's almost perfectly aligned to the population bell curve. Whether or not they test to stop curve been to weighted at either end is somewhat different of course.
 
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