If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(AZ Family)   Broken pipes cause a water shortage in the Grand Canyon. If only there was some kind of seemingly-endless liquid source nearby powerful enough to carve the earth's most massive gorge down through a mile of dirt and rock   (azfamily.com) divider line 1
    More: Interesting, Grand Canyon, water shortages  
•       •       •

2553 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Jun 2013 at 9:26 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-06-29 11:44:13 AM  
1 votes:

Wolf_Blitzer: iheartscotch: Wolf_Blitzer: Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: If only you wouldn't have to carry it up a mile vertically on donkeys, Subby. You're never been there, have you?

The article says that the shortage is at Phantom Ranch, which is at the bottom of the canyon.

Phantom ranch is a very cool place. It's a dozen or so limestone buildings at the bottom of the canyon. The buildings are probably 100 years old; built out of local materials.

The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules. Everything from the forks to the bunks came down on a mule; as there is no other cost effective way to get anything to the bottom.

/ you can book a night at the bottom; the reservation service opens 6 months in advance and fills in days if not hours.

// if you do go to the canyon, do not attempt to go rim to river and back in one day; it's not Disney world and people still die on the trail

I was there (Grand Canyon, not Phantom Ranch) last November, which is a great time to go as long as there's not a ton of snow on the rim. I can't imagine trying to hike there this time of year, the heat in the inner gorge has to be brutal. I stopped at the recommended day-hike turnaround point, so rim to river is still on my bucket list (screw that, if I get the chance I'll do the full Kaibab trail North-to-South Rim). Amazing place.


Actually, most days, the inner gorge; down by the river, is a lot cooler than it is at the rim. I've been rim to river once. Getting down is the easy part; getting back out again is the hard part.

I recommend phantom ranch highly; if you don't stay there, you'd have to camp. If you are less than 180 pounds, you can ride one of the mules down. My uncle did that; he said that he would have preferred his own 2 feet. But, if you take a mule; you're guarenteed a bunk.

/ My dad has been rim to river 4 times; I think my mom is trying to kill him
 
Displayed 1 of 1 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report