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(AZ Family)   Broken pipes cause a water shortage in the Grand Canyon. If only there was some kind of seemingly-endless liquid source nearby powerful enough to carve the earth's most massive gorge down through a mile of dirt and rock   (azfamily.com) divider line 45
    More: Interesting, Grand Canyon, water shortages  
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2551 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Jun 2013 at 9:26 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-29 09:31:01 AM
You go right ahead and drink from the Colorado, subby.
 
2013-06-29 09:34:26 AM

Wolf_Blitzer: You go right ahead and drink from the Colorado, subby.


farm4.static.flickr.com
 
2013-06-29 09:35:05 AM
Crap! Was that our water supply? Cause I peed in it while we were tubing yesterday.

/Probably a law against taking it, Subby. They take water pretty seriously on the Colorado.
 
2013-06-29 09:40:43 AM

Wolf_Blitzer: You go right ahead and drink from the Colorado, subby.


4.bp.blogspot.com


www.adventureleadership.ca
 
2013-06-29 09:40:51 AM
If only you wouldn't have to carry it up a mile vertically on donkeys, Subby. You're never been there, have you?
 
2013-06-29 09:41:48 AM

Kimpak: Wolf_Blitzer: You go right ahead and drink from the Colorado, subby.

[farm4.static.flickr.com image 375x500]


Clever. Yes, I get that you can bring your own purification gear - and so did TFA. So, what are we doing here again?
 
2013-06-29 09:42:14 AM

Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: If only you wouldn't have to carry it up a mile vertically on donkeys, Subby. You've never been there, have you?


/FTFM.
//Damn Autocorrect
 
2013-06-29 09:42:51 AM

Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: If only you wouldn't have to carry it up a mile vertically on donkeys, Subby. You're never been there, have you?


The article says that the shortage is at Phantom Ranch, which is at the bottom of the canyon.
 
2013-06-29 09:43:22 AM
I it would probably take as long to cut the red tape, extract, process, and deliver that water as it did to carve that gorge.
 
2013-06-29 09:43:55 AM
My hat's off to anyone who'd dare to fix a water pipe that goes straight down a canyon wall.
 
2013-06-29 09:44:17 AM

Wolf_Blitzer: Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: If only you wouldn't have to carry it up a mile vertically on donkeys, Subby. You're never been there, have you?

The article says that the shortage is at Phantom Ranch, which is at the bottom of the canyon.


Oops. Foot, meet mouth.
 
2013-06-29 09:44:38 AM
Water doesn't like to go up. Pumping it up that vertical mile is not the right way to get water to the rim.

The pressure at the bottom of a mile High pipe is the same as a mile down in the ocean.
 
2013-06-29 09:45:29 AM
Maybe I should rtfa
 
2013-06-29 09:51:44 AM

Bravo Two: Wolf_Blitzer: You go right ahead and drink from the Colorado, subby.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 850x567]


[www.adventureleadership.ca image 440x440]


Since everyone's a comedian, I'll reiterate: Yes you can purify the river water, which is just what the Park Service is telling hikers to do. But you'd need a larger treatment system at the bottom to handle all the people normally going to Phantom Ranch, and there isn't one. Which is why it's closed until they fix the pipeline.
 
2013-06-29 09:53:41 AM
Probably has something to do with Nik Wallendas prayers.
 
2013-06-29 09:59:35 AM
Emphasis on the word "seemingly".
 
2013-06-29 10:00:53 AM

geopb: Water doesn't like to go up. Pumping it up that vertical mile is not the right way to get water to the rim.

The pressure at the bottom of a mile High pipe is the same as a mile down in the ocean.


This!!!
 
2013-06-29 10:08:57 AM
Is subby talking about the Flood? We can't have another flood because of rainbows.
 
2013-06-29 10:18:32 AM
So you're saying the water can be filtered? Well goddamn, have you hydro-geniuses alerted the Park Service to your discovery?
 
2013-06-29 10:40:27 AM
Silly Subby, everyone knows there's no water in the river because of all those evil people living in cities drank it up.
 
2013-06-29 10:53:14 AM
Do you hear that?

That's the sound of Xanterra raising  the price of their bottled water ten fold.
 
2013-06-29 11:05:36 AM

Bravo Two: Wolf_Blitzer: You go right ahead and drink from the Colorado, subby.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 850x567]


[www.adventureleadership.ca image 440x440]




www.outdooroutlet.com
 
2013-06-29 11:05:50 AM

Gunny Walker: Crap! Was that our water supply? Cause I peed in it while we were tubing yesterday.

/Probably a law against taking it, Subby. They take water pretty seriously on the Colorado.


This.  Every drop is somebody's property...
 
2013-06-29 11:16:12 AM

Bladel: Gunny Walker: Crap! Was that our water supply? Cause I peed in it while we were tubing yesterday.

/Probably a law against taking it, Subby. They take water pretty seriously on the Colorado.

This.  Every drop is somebody's property...


I'll pass on the rights to  Gunny Walker's former property.
 
2013-06-29 11:21:07 AM

Wolf_Blitzer: Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: If only you wouldn't have to carry it up a mile vertically on donkeys, Subby. You're never been there, have you?

The article says that the shortage is at Phantom Ranch, which is at the bottom of the canyon.


Phantom ranch is a very cool place. It's a dozen or so limestone buildings at the bottom of the canyon. The buildings are probably 100 years old; built out of local materials.

The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules. Everything from the forks to the bunks came down on a mule; as there is no other cost effective way to get anything to the bottom.

/ you can book a night at the bottom; the reservation service opens 6 months in advance and fills in days if not hours.

// if you do go to the canyon, do not attempt to go rim to river and back in one day; it's not Disney world and people still die on the trail
 
2013-06-29 11:31:40 AM

iheartscotch: Wolf_Blitzer: Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: If only you wouldn't have to carry it up a mile vertically on donkeys, Subby. You're never been there, have you?

The article says that the shortage is at Phantom Ranch, which is at the bottom of the canyon.

Phantom ranch is a very cool place. It's a dozen or so limestone buildings at the bottom of the canyon. The buildings are probably 100 years old; built out of local materials.

The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules. Everything from the forks to the bunks came down on a mule; as there is no other cost effective way to get anything to the bottom.

/ you can book a night at the bottom; the reservation service opens 6 months in advance and fills in days if not hours.

// if you do go to the canyon, do not attempt to go rim to river and back in one day; it's not Disney world and people still die on the trail


I was there (Grand Canyon, not Phantom Ranch) last November, which is a great time to go as long as there's not a ton of snow on the rim. I can't imagine trying to hike there this time of year, the heat in the inner gorge has to be brutal. I stopped at the recommended day-hike turnaround point, so rim to river is still on my bucket list (screw that, if I get the chance I'll do the full Kaibab trail North-to-South Rim). Amazing place.
 
2013-06-29 11:42:41 AM
I can't understand why this was greenlit.
 
2013-06-29 11:44:13 AM

Wolf_Blitzer: iheartscotch: Wolf_Blitzer: Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: If only you wouldn't have to carry it up a mile vertically on donkeys, Subby. You're never been there, have you?

The article says that the shortage is at Phantom Ranch, which is at the bottom of the canyon.

Phantom ranch is a very cool place. It's a dozen or so limestone buildings at the bottom of the canyon. The buildings are probably 100 years old; built out of local materials.

The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules. Everything from the forks to the bunks came down on a mule; as there is no other cost effective way to get anything to the bottom.

/ you can book a night at the bottom; the reservation service opens 6 months in advance and fills in days if not hours.

// if you do go to the canyon, do not attempt to go rim to river and back in one day; it's not Disney world and people still die on the trail

I was there (Grand Canyon, not Phantom Ranch) last November, which is a great time to go as long as there's not a ton of snow on the rim. I can't imagine trying to hike there this time of year, the heat in the inner gorge has to be brutal. I stopped at the recommended day-hike turnaround point, so rim to river is still on my bucket list (screw that, if I get the chance I'll do the full Kaibab trail North-to-South Rim). Amazing place.


Actually, most days, the inner gorge; down by the river, is a lot cooler than it is at the rim. I've been rim to river once. Getting down is the easy part; getting back out again is the hard part.

I recommend phantom ranch highly; if you don't stay there, you'd have to camp. If you are less than 180 pounds, you can ride one of the mules down. My uncle did that; he said that he would have preferred his own 2 feet. But, if you take a mule; you're guarenteed a bunk.

/ My dad has been rim to river 4 times; I think my mom is trying to kill him
 
2013-06-29 12:01:34 PM
My wife and I hiked on the Bright Angel Trail not two weeks ago.  Being that it was our first time, we did a short trip - 3 miles.  Started at 7:30am, got out a little after 10am.  We each carried 3 liters of water plus assorted snacks.  Perhaps a bit of overkill but we didn't want to be caught unaware.  We are both in good shape and still went through almost 2/3rds of our water by the time we got out.

Now, one thing the rangers tell you is that you shouldn't hike between 10am - 4pm.  That's because the sun is high enough that the canyon walls don't provide much shade and the place turns into a roaster (not much wind down there either).

As we were coming out (10a-ish), we saw people who were just starting down into the canyon.  A bunch of them were going to the same place we had turned around at and they were carrying a single bottle of water.  Like something you get from a gas station.   I worry about those people.
 
2013-06-29 12:49:44 PM
The nice part about the bright angel trail is that there are two or three huts on the way up with cold freshwater taps, so you don't need to carry all your water up, you can refill your bottles as you go. I think it takes like 8 hours to hike up, so you really only need two bottles each or so, or camelback. I can't wait to take my wife there in a year or two, I'm trying to get get into outdoorsy stuff.
 
2013-06-29 01:01:14 PM

Wolf_Blitzer: You go right ahead and drink from the Colorado, subby.


My personal choice:

www.uphill.com
 
2013-06-29 01:38:06 PM

iheartscotch: Wolf_Blitzer: Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: If only you wouldn't have to carry it up a mile vertically on donkeys, Subby. You're never been there, have you?

The article says that the shortage is at Phantom Ranch, which is at the bottom of the canyon.

Phantom ranch is a very cool place. It's a dozen or so limestone buildings at the bottom of the canyon. The buildings are probably 100 years old; built out of local materials.

The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules. Everything from the forks to the bunks came down on a mule; as there is no other cost effective way to get anything to the bottom.

/ you can book a night at the bottom; the reservation service opens 6 months in advance and fills in days if not hours.

// if you do go to the canyon, do not attempt to go rim to river and back in one day; it's not Disney world and people still die on the trail


I did a rim to rim hike from south to north, hardest thing I've ever done bar none. Two hours in the swamp cooled air at the ranch was nice.
 
2013-06-29 02:45:26 PM
If only there was some kind of seemingly-endless liquid source nearby

ecowatch.org
 
2013-06-29 02:46:25 PM

iheartscotch: The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules.


What do they do with the sewage?
 
2013-06-29 03:21:29 PM

flondrix: iheartscotch: The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules.

What do they do with the sewage?


I don't really remember, it has been a long time since I was there. They've got water inflow through pipes and showers if I remember right; but, conservation of resources is key. I wouldn't be surprised to discover an outhouse at the bottom.

/ Other than that; the old camping stand-by would hold; go 20 yards into the forest in a downhill direction, dig a hole( not close to any source of water), use hole, shovel dirt back.

// as an Eagle Scout, trust me when I tell you, that's not the most unpleasant thing about camping.
 
2013-06-29 03:56:37 PM

iheartscotch: The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules. Everything from the forks to the bunks came down on a mule; as there is no other cost effective way to get anything to the bottom.


It seems odd that no one could design a ropeway and generator that could handle the incline, but I imagine it's as much for the mystique as cost-effectiveness.
 
2013-06-29 04:29:41 PM

foxyshadis: iheartscotch: The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules. Everything from the forks to the bunks came down on a mule; as there is no other cost effective way to get anything to the bottom.

It seems odd that no one could design a ropeway and generator that could handle the incline, but I imagine it's as much for the mystique as cost-effectiveness.


The canyon isn't straight up and down; there are plateaus, spires, buttes, bluffs and numerous other rock formations that would make any "skyway" like you are describing hard to build. You'd have to build it in stages.

Plus, any ropeway would have to be anchored without the advantage of heavy equipment. I suppose they could carry it down piece by piece and assemble it down at the bottom. But, all the pieces would have to be small enough and light enough to fit on the mule.

/ the scale of the canyon is immense; nearly 2 miles down and about 10 lateral miles from the rim to the river on the nearest side of the rim.

// it hasn't been done since it would be prohibitively expensive; and no one would let you marr the canyon with a cable car either.
 
2013-06-29 05:33:05 PM
The reality is that the river didn't carve down through the canyon. Instead the land rose around the river. Fact.
 
2013-06-29 07:49:22 PM
Weeeell... The Grand Canyon may not the most massive but still a nice one to look at.
farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2013-06-29 08:27:36 PM

geopb: Water doesn't like to go up. Pumping it up that vertical mile is not the right way to get water to the rim.


Water isn't pumped from the river to the rim, it's siphoned from a spring on the north rim to the south rim (which is ~1000 feet lower than the north rim, if I recall).

iheartscotch: Actually, most days, the inner gorge; down by the river, is a lot cooler than it is at the rim. I've been rim to river once.

This is not true at all. Just looking at the vegetation changes from rim (real trees) to river (very desert like) should be enough evidence of that.

 
2013-06-29 08:58:38 PM

flondrix: iheartscotch: The thing that makes it really cool is, everything there goes down on mules. The trash comes back up on mules.

What do they do with the sewage?


Composting toilets I believe (thats what you'll find at the few stops on the way down, at least).
 
2013-06-29 10:46:17 PM
By the way, the river did not carve most of the canyon. A serious of catastrophic floods carved the canyon when lakes gave way through dams created by glaciation.
 
2013-06-30 10:01:13 AM
But it's still only 6,000 years old, isn't it?
 
2013-06-30 01:58:37 PM

Third Leg: geopb: Water doesn't like to go up. Pumping it up that vertical mile is not the right way to get water to the rim.

Water isn't pumped from the river to the rim, it's siphoned from a spring on the north rim to the south rim (which is ~1000 feet lower than the north rim, if I recall).

iheartscotch: Actually, most days, the inner gorge; down by the river, is a lot cooler than it is at the rim. I've been rim to river once.
This is not true at all. Just looking at the vegetation changes from rim (real trees) to river (very desert like) should be enough evidence of that.


Um, you've never been down to the bottom before, have you? There are trees close to the river.

Here's the website for the phantom ranch; you can see several trees in the picture.

http://www.grandcanyonlodges.com/phantom-ranch-704.html (copy/pasta)
 
2013-06-30 08:51:37 PM

wademh: By the way, the river did not carve most of the canyon. A serious of catastrophic floods carved the canyon when lakes gave way through dams created by glaciation.


Where the hell did you get that? That's not even remotely close to accurate. Most of the canyon is 6 million years old, it predates North American glaciation by ~4 million years, and glaciers never reached anywhere near that far south in any case.
 
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