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(BBC)   PSA: 'Free range eggs' is supposed to mean a bit more than 'we rolled them around in the yard for a bit'   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 49
    More: Dumbass, Dorset, PSA, trading standards  
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4665 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Jun 2013 at 1:37 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-28 01:38:19 PM
The only word that means anything as far as labeling eggs is "organic," which means that the the chickens are fed only organic foods, are not treated with antibiotics except in cases where the flock is infected with something, and have access to the outdoors (although that access might be a very small pen).

Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them. The "free range" eggs you buy in a store are no different from the eggs this couple was selling.

/6-chicken flock at home
 
2013-06-28 01:41:33 PM
egg roll trifecta?
 
2013-06-28 01:42:24 PM
Everything I have read about eggs has convinced me that any fresh egg is an excellent and delicious source of sustenance.
 
2013-06-28 01:43:55 PM
Well how much exercise and open space does an egg even need?
 
2013-06-28 01:44:17 PM
These are my eggs, and this is their Range Rover!  They're free to range and rove!
 
2013-06-28 01:46:01 PM

Pocket Ninja: The only word that means anything as far as labeling eggs is "organic," which means that the the chickens are fed only organic foods, are not treated with antibiotics except in cases where the flock is infected with something, and have access to the outdoors (although that access might be a very small pen).

Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them. The "free range" eggs you buy in a store are no different from the eggs this couple was selling.

/6-chicken flock at home


Unless "Organic" labeling is being certified by some group it's still so vague as to not mean much.
 
2013-06-28 01:46:03 PM
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-06-28 01:46:20 PM

Pocket Ninja: The only word that means anything as far as labeling eggs is "organic," which means that the the chickens are fed only organic foods, are not treated with antibiotics except in cases where the flock is infected with something, and have access to the outdoors (although that access might be a very small pen).

Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them. The "free range" eggs you buy in a store are no different from the eggs this couple was selling.

/6-chicken flock at home


Uh, 6/10?
How do you even respond to a serious PN post?

/Hold me
//So cold
 
2013-06-28 01:46:22 PM
Is there such thing as "rifle range" eggs?
*pictures a flock of egg-laying chickens scrabbling away from gunfire*
 
2013-06-28 01:47:00 PM
selling eggs with the producer's stamps removed

Incurring the immediate wrath of the Federal Egg Answering Room
 
2013-06-28 01:48:17 PM
Thems 'free range' eggs.  It's funny how the stupid are separated from their money so easily.
 
2013-06-28 01:49:45 PM

SwiftFox: selling eggs with the producer's stamps removed

Incurring the immediate wrath of the Federal Egg Answering Room


That's no joke.  You should be afraid of messing with the Federal Egg Answering Room unless you want to shell out some serious chickenfeed.
 
2013-06-28 01:50:03 PM

Pocket Ninja: The only word that means anything as far as labeling eggs is "organic," which means that the the chickens are fed only organic foods, are not treated with antibiotics except in cases where the flock is infected with something, and have access to the outdoors (although that access might be a very small pen).

Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them. The "free range" eggs you buy in a store are no different from the eggs this couple was selling.

/6-chicken flock at home


Even the "organic" label is being stretched.  If there is a buck to be made, someone is going to scratch and peck at the laws and regs to make it.

//Four Three chickens (and a random dove that shows up to eat what they've tossed out of the coop).
 
2013-06-28 01:52:11 PM

Pocket Ninja: The only word that means anything as far as labeling eggs is "organic," which means that the the chickens are fed only organic foods, are not treated with antibiotics except in cases where the flock is infected with something, and have access to the outdoors (although that access might be a very small pen).


"Organic" tends to be "no antibiotics, ever". Treatment-based antibiotics are generally called "humane".
 
2013-06-28 01:54:03 PM

Pocket Ninja: /6-chicken flock at home


I used to do that, then realized I could buy eggs in 5-dozen pallets at Winco for about $6 a pallet...or about 10 cents each egg.

/gave away my hens
 
2013-06-28 01:55:09 PM

Whiskey Dickens: Pocket Ninja: The only word that means anything as far as labeling eggs is "organic," which means that the the chickens are fed only organic foods, are not treated with antibiotics except in cases where the flock is infected with something, and have access to the outdoors (although that access might be a very small pen).

Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them. The "free range" eggs you buy in a store are no different from the eggs this couple was selling.

/6-chicken flock at home

Uh, 6/10?
How do you even respond to a serious PN post?

/Hold me
//So cold


Caught off guard by an honest reply.  I heard a bit on NPR about "cage free".   Basically they are still in a hut to never see the light of day, just not in a cage so they are free to peck away at the one that died.  "cage free" eggs apparently cost twice as much.

I was more comforted more by the Colbert report about doubling the cage size.
 
2013-06-28 01:56:26 PM

Pocket Ninja: The only word that means anything as far as labeling eggs is "organic," which means that the the chickens are fed only organic foods, are not treated with antibiotics except in cases where the flock is infected with something, and have access to the outdoors (although that access might be a very small pen).

Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them. The "free range" eggs you buy in a store are no different from the eggs this couple was selling.



That's true under US standards: EU standards are much more stringent.

From wikipedia:

US "Free Range":

USDA  free range regulations currently apply only to poultry and indicate that the animal has been allowed access to the outside. The USDA regulations do not specify the quality or size of the outside range nor the duration of time an animal must have access to the outside.


EU "Free Range":

The European Union regulates marketing standards for egg farming which specifies the following (cumulative) minimum conditions for the free-range method:

* hens have continuous daytime access to open-air runs, except in the case of temporary restrictions imposed by veterinary authorities,
* the open-air runs to which hens have access is mainly covered with vegetation and not used for other purposes except for orchards, woodland and livestock grazing if the latter is authorised by the competent authorities,
* the open-air runs must at least satisfy the conditions specified in Article 4(1)(3)(b)(ii) of Directive 1999/74/EC whereby the maximum stocking density is not greater than 2500 hens per hectare of ground available to the hens or one hen per 4m<sup>2</sup> at all times and the runs are not extending beyond a radius of 150 m from the nearest pophole of the building; an extension of up to 350 m from the nearest pophole of the building is permissible provided that a sufficient number of shelters and drinking troughs within the meaning of that provision are evenly distributed throughout the whole open-air run with at least four shelters per hectare.


 
2013-06-28 01:57:49 PM
I've been seeing some eggs labeled "certified cruelty free" latley on the carton.
 
2013-06-28 01:58:17 PM
I still can't tell the difference in taste of a store bought / production egg vs. a free range / organic egg. The only difference I can tell is the color of the yolk on a farm raised egg is yellower and brighter.

/10 chicken flock

JC
 
2013-06-28 02:04:16 PM
Knows a thing or two about eggs.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-28 02:05:04 PM

Stone Meadow: I used to do that, then realized I could buy eggs in 5-dozen pallets


jesus man, you eat a lot of eggs... would not want to share an office
 
2013-06-28 02:08:21 PM

Stone Meadow: Pocket Ninja: /6-chicken flock at home

I used to do that, then realized I could buy eggs in 5-dozen pallets at Winco for about $6 a pallet...or about 10 cents each egg.

/gave away my hens


www.squidmobile.com
 
2013-06-28 02:11:59 PM

Pocket Ninja: Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them.


Just here to point out that "free range", "barn" and "caged" all have tight legal definitions in the UK.
 
2013-06-28 02:14:06 PM

Pocket Ninja: The only word that means anything as far as labeling eggs is "organic," which means that the the chickens are fed only organic foods, are not treated with antibiotics except in cases where the flock is infected with something, and have access to the outdoors (although that access might be a very small pen).

Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them. The "free range" eggs you buy in a store are no different from the eggs this couple was selling.

/6-chicken flock at home


Cool.  I have seven.  Had eight but one lived as long as she could...poor girl couldn't even walk in the end.

They make terrific garbage disposals, too.
 
2013-06-28 02:21:52 PM

orbister: Pocket Ninja: Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them.

Just here to point out that "free range", "barn" and "caged" all have tight legal definitions in the UK.


Ok, legit question, my grandmother kept "Layers" (always kept 14 so she would have a good chance of 1 dozen eggs every day) as she called in a 40X30 pen the backyard, the pen had a coop the chickens were free to enter and leave at will, and the coop had a laying box so all she would have to do is open the box and pull out all the eggs. She fed them Purina Chicken Feed, and manipulated the lighting in the coop and pen so they would lay year round.  Under modern guidelines what those eggs be considered.

/Genuinely curious.
 
2013-06-28 02:27:52 PM
Now if they can only do something about those "free-range children" roaming the restaurants.
 
2013-06-28 02:35:04 PM

Tom_Slick: orbister: Pocket Ninja: Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them.

Just here to point out that "free range", "barn" and "caged" all have tight legal definitions in the UK.

Ok, legit question, my grandmother kept "Layers" (always kept 14 so she would have a good chance of 1 dozen eggs every day) as she called in a 40X30 pen the backyard, the pen had a coop the chickens were free to enter and leave at will, and the coop had a laying box so all she would have to do is open the box and pull out all the eggs. She fed them Purina Chicken Feed, and manipulated the lighting in the coop and pen so they would lay year round.  Under modern guidelines what those eggs be considered.

/Genuinely curious.


Free range and cage free.

But those labels are pretty useless.

The real question is, were they tasty eggs (and chickens)?
 
2013-06-28 02:38:42 PM
They were fined £300 each and ordered to pay a total of £1,178 costs.

Bummer - they were prolly lookin for 3 hots and a cot not getting fined . . .  Gonna be a cold winter.
 
2013-06-28 02:42:35 PM

meat0918: The real question is, were they tasty eggs (and chickens)?


Oh yes best damn eggs I've ever had and they Poached so beautifully fluffy, she kept the coop from the 1940s (there was a war on you know) up until 5 years ago when she turned 95.  3 years ago my Cousin's daughter (her great grand-daughter) joined 4H and her father moved the chicken coop to their backyard 10 miles away.  Tose eggs are just as good since she keeps the chickens the exact same way.
 
2013-06-28 02:43:42 PM

Tom_Slick: orbister: Pocket Ninja: Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them.

Just here to point out that "free range", "barn" and "caged" all have tight legal definitions in the UK.

Ok, legit question, my grandmother kept "Layers" (always kept 14 so she would have a good chance of 1 dozen eggs every day) as she called in a 40X30 pen the backyard, the pen had a coop the chickens were free to enter and leave at will, and the coop had a laying box so all she would have to do is open the box and pull out all the eggs. She fed them Purina Chicken Feed, and manipulated the lighting in the coop and pen so they would lay year round.  Under modern guidelines what those eggs be considered.

/Genuinely curious.


I don't know what's in Purina Chicken Feed; that would be an important determinant of whether they're truly "organic." But I'm assuming she was raising the eggs for herself and family, and possibly to sell at farmer's markets, etc. Most people just call those "local eggs" and assume they actually are all those fake terms you see in the market (ie, cage free, free range, etc.).
 
2013-06-28 02:49:45 PM

Pocket Ninja: I don't know what's in Purina Chicken Feed; that would be an important determinant of whether they're truly "organic." But I'm assuming she was raising the eggs for herself and family, and possibly to sell at farmer's markets, etc. Most people just call those "local eggs" and assume they actually are all those fake terms you see in the market (ie, cage free, free range, etc.).


She and my grandfather ran a General Store, she sold them there until she closed it in the 1980s, then local people would just pull in the driveway and buy her eggs. She sold them as Fresh Eggs.  Nothing more nothing less, just Fresh Eggs.
 
2013-06-28 02:56:10 PM

Tom_Slick: She and my grandfather ran a General Store, she sold them there until she closed it in the 1980s, then local people would just pull in the driveway and buy her eggs. She sold them as Fresh Eggs.  Nothing more nothing less, just Fresh Eggs.


That's the best kind.
 
2013-06-28 02:58:38 PM

Pocket Ninja: Tom_Slick: She and my grandfather ran a General Store, she sold them there until she closed it in the 1980s, then local people would just pull in the driveway and buy her eggs. She sold them as Fresh Eggs.  Nothing more nothing less, just Fresh Eggs.

That's the best kind.


She is also a wiseass so if someone would ask "How Fresh?" the response was always the same. "The eggs were in the chicken last night"
 
2013-06-28 03:08:10 PM
So what's the current risk on salmonella with eggs?  I know it became an issue when we decided stuffing chickens into battery cages to maximize how many we could get in a space, then we started stuffing their weakened, frail bodies with antibiotics to try and contain it... but has the disease gotten resistant, or has it really been eradicated from most of the US supply?

I ask because I want a farking steak tartare again, and be able to give the finger to that old bitty that tells me that I'm going catch food poisoning and die.
 
2013-06-28 03:20:36 PM

Bslim: Everything I have read about eggs has convinced me that any fresh egg is an excellent and delicious source of sustenance.


So one of those egg council creeps got to you too huh?


i.minus.com
 
2013-06-28 03:30:13 PM

Pocket Ninja: The only word that means anything as far as labeling eggs is "organic," which means that the the chickens are fed only organic foods, are not treated with antibiotics except in cases where the flock is infected with something, and have access to the outdoors (although that access might be a very small pen).

Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them. The "free range" eggs you buy in a store are no different from the eggs this couple was selling.

/6-chicken flock at home


THIS.
 
2013-06-28 04:04:51 PM
i1253.photobucket.com
Free lance rooster
 
2013-06-28 04:15:20 PM
Cage Free?

memecrunch.com
 
2013-06-28 05:19:40 PM

Tom_Slick: Ok, legit question, my grandmother kept "Layers" (always kept 14 so she would have a good chance of 1 dozen eggs every day) as she called in a 40X30 pen the backyard, the pen had a coop the chickens were free to enter and leave at will, and the coop had a laying box so all she would have to do is open the box and pull out all the eggs. She fed them Purina Chicken Feed, and manipulated the lighting in the coop and pen so they would lay year round.  Under modern guidelines what those eggs be considered.


I'm neither a lawyer nor a poultryman, but I'm pretty sure these would count as free range in the UK.
 
2013-06-28 05:40:25 PM
What do you want? Egg in your beer?
 
2013-06-28 05:48:44 PM

Tom_Slick: orbister: Pocket Ninja: Words like "free range," "pasture raised," "farm raised," "cage free," and other happy bits of imagery that evoke clucking flocks frolicking across green fields, are completely meaningless terms that have no force of law behind them.

Just here to point out that "free range", "barn" and "caged" all have tight legal definitions in the UK.

Ok, legit question, my grandmother kept "Layers" (always kept 14 so she would have a good chance of 1 dozen eggs every day) as she called in a 40X30 pen the backyard, the pen had a coop the chickens were free to enter and leave at will, and the coop had a laying box so all she would have to do is open the box and pull out all the eggs. She fed them Purina Chicken Feed, and manipulated the lighting in the coop and pen so they would lay year round.  Under modern guidelines what those eggs be considered.

/Genuinely curious.


14 hens in a 40x30 would be considered free range by UK definitions.  What really makes eggs taste bad is hens not allowed any room to move.  You get weak shells, weak yolks and sulphur farts.
 
2013-06-28 05:51:52 PM

DemoKnite: You get weak shells, weak yolks and sulphur farts


Heh.  Sometimes my hens (1/2 acre yard for them) lay the tiny eggs with nothing in them, egg farts.  I use those to replace the pigeon eggs which have decided to live in the chicken coop to control the breeding.
 
2013-06-28 09:45:48 PM
I really really am not sure just why, but the headline made me laugh my frakkin ass off.

/could be the hot weather I just got back inside from
//I think I'd like to meet Tom_Slick's granny too
 
2013-06-28 10:12:04 PM

Kittypie070: I really really am not sure just why, but the headline made me laugh my frakkin ass off.

/could be the hot weather I just got back inside from
//I think I'd like to meet Tom_Slick's granny too


Why? She hasn't washed her vagaygay since last Sunday, she smells worse than wet chicken feathers, and she smokes unfiltered ciggies.

/married to a granny... ;^)
 
2013-06-28 11:15:57 PM
Bah.  I don't have a problem with this.  "free range", "organic", "green", "sustainable" and any other such bullshiat are nothing more than marketing gimmicks created to pull in the suckers among us.  There is no damn difference between a free range egg and a "intensively farmed" egg.
 
2013-06-29 05:22:42 AM
What most people think when they hear free range chickens/eggs
matronofhusbandry.files.wordpress.com

What "free range" is actually like in some cases because some farmers are dishonest and will only meet the minimum requirement.
advocacy.britannica.com
 
2013-06-29 05:23:57 AM

Ima4nic8or: Bah.  I don't have a problem with this.  "free range", "organic", "green", "sustainable" and any other such bullshiat are nothing more than marketing gimmicks created to pull in the suckers among us.  There is no damn difference between a free range egg and a "intensively farmed" egg.


Unless you count "taste".
 
2013-06-29 11:16:15 AM
Day_Old_Dutchie:
"Now if they can only do something about those "free-range children" roaming the restaurants."

Seriously.
 
2013-06-29 11:18:37 AM
WhoGAS:
"Heh.  Sometimes my hens (1/2 acre yard for them) lay the tiny eggs with nothing in them, egg farts."
Never heard of that.

Sometimes my mom's chickens lay eggs without the shell tho, just creepy little see-thru sacs.
 
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