If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(New York Magazine)   Tear-jerking video of dog burying dead puppy was not compassion... it was food preparation   (nymag.com) divider line 139
    More: Followup, cooking, dog burying, The Christian Post, Museum of Natural History, compassion, Daily Intelligencer, dogs  
•       •       •

15589 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jun 2013 at 5:04 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



139 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-06-27 05:07:07 PM
Dogs is better people than people.
 
2013-06-27 05:07:13 PM
So the morale of the story is dead puppies are delicious?
 
2013-06-27 05:07:53 PM
Hoarders: Animal Planet Edition, Thursday nights @8
 
2013-06-27 05:08:09 PM
Soylent Gray is DOGGGGGGGS!
 
2013-06-27 05:08:15 PM

Reminds me of one of my old Paintshoops...

i253.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-27 05:08:33 PM
Awwwwww how cute is that?
 
2013-06-27 05:12:24 PM
I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.
 
2013-06-27 05:14:36 PM

Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.


Given the internet tears that have been shed, yes, yes they did.
 
2013-06-27 05:14:46 PM

Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?


Yes.  based purely on comments, it seems like MOST people thought it was grief.
 
2013-06-27 05:15:34 PM

buckets_of_fun: So the morale of the story is dead puppies are delicious?


Maybe, but they aren't much fun.
 
2013-06-27 05:16:51 PM
Michael Pollan's latest book is partly about fermenting. Up in Iceland they'll bury a type of shark and let the microbes work on it for a year or so. It comes out smelling none-too-good, but it's a delicacy. To them. I'll bet, to a dog, that pup will be delish.
 
2013-06-27 05:17:02 PM
I for one cannot WAIT to get on Facebook this afternoon to see how this has blossomed into a many-headed tirade about anthropomorphism versus OMFG YOULIBSRALLRETARDS! to it obviously being Obama's fault because his wife has or had bangs - and of course we all know what THAT means!!
 
2013-06-27 05:17:30 PM

Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.


The Libtards at HuffPo do.
 
Ral
2013-06-27 05:18:44 PM
Well duh.  Dogs don't bury their dead.  That's ridiculous.
 
2013-06-27 05:19:23 PM

Tumunga: Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.

The Libtards at HuffPo do.


2/10.  No one uses libtard in a non-ironic fashion.
 
2013-06-27 05:19:27 PM
Six weeks later the dog dug it back up. 'Oh, I forgot about this. Hahaha. Hubba hubba hubba hubba hubba.'
 
2013-06-27 05:21:10 PM

Dear Jerk: Michael Pollan's latest book is partly about fermenting. Up in Iceland they'll bury a type of shark and let the microbes work on it for a year or so. It comes out smelling none-too-good, but it's a delicacy. To them. I'll bet, to a dog, that pup will be delish.


I don't think they bury food as any kind of preparation. I think it's more to keep other predators from getting at it.

That said: Don't anthropomorphize dogs. They hate that.
 
2013-06-27 05:21:25 PM
Good god, people are farking stupid. Dogs don't bury their own. Unless when you lost ol' Rover, Sparky went out back and buried him for you? Didn't think so.
 
2013-06-27 05:21:40 PM
Does it make me a dick because I LOL at the dog tamping the tail down repeatedly?
 
2013-06-27 05:23:19 PM
When the cat got squished under the garage door we buried him in the back yard.   The dog dug him up and gnawed on him like a chew toy.
 
2013-06-27 05:23:26 PM
When I was growing up I was at a friend's house who had a huge pit bull. The little old lady next door had a Chihuahua. One day while we were on his porch his dog came up with the Chihuahua in his mouth and it was dead. We panicked. We figured maybe we could just reattach it to its leash and hope the little old lady thought her dog died on its own. A few hours later we hear her screaming! We run over and she's holding her dead dog. She asked who would do such a thing? We said it looks like it died on its own. She said "It died two days ago. Someone dug it up and reattached it to its leash!"
 
2013-06-27 05:23:32 PM
Up until now, I thought my cat was grieving for it's turds. Considering that, it also makes sense why my dog goes and digs them up to eat them as well.
 
2013-06-27 05:23:35 PM
Your dog expects you to feed it whether you are alive or not.
 
2013-06-27 05:24:12 PM

buckets_of_fun: So the morale of the story is dead puppies are delicious?


The moral of the story is that there is no moral as far as the dog is concerned.

media.tumblr.com
 
2013-06-27 05:25:14 PM

Dear Jerk: Six weeks later the dog dug it back up. 'Oh, I forgot about this. Hahaha. Hubba hubba hubba hubba hubba.'


He's a happy boy
(happy boy)
 
2013-06-27 05:26:45 PM

Rapmaster2000: Tumunga: Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.

The Libtards at HuffPo do.

2/10.  No one uses libtard in a non-ironic fashion.


Typical democRAT dismissing a strong conservative without addressing any points.
 
2013-06-27 05:26:59 PM

buckets_of_fun: So the morale of the story is dead puppies are delicious?


No, the morale of the story is low.
The morel of the story is an edible mushroom found in early spring.
The moral of the story is, a dog may not know why it buries a pup, but it may a cur to it later.
 
2013-06-27 05:28:31 PM
4 beggin strips.
 
2013-06-27 05:28:36 PM

Spam Pajamas: When I was growing up I was at a friend's house who had a huge pit bull. The little old lady next door had a Chihuahua. One day while we were on his porch his dog came up with the Chihuahua in his mouth and it was dead. We panicked. We figured maybe we could just reattach it to its leash and hope the little old lady thought her dog died on its own. A few hours later we hear her screaming! We run over and she's holding her dead dog. She asked who would do such a thing? We said it looks like it died on its own. She said "It died two days ago. Someone dug it up and reattached it to its leash!"


I thought it was a rabbit and being put back in its hutch.  But what do I know, it was your childhood.
 
2013-06-27 05:28:52 PM

iheartscotch: Dogs is better people than people.


People are a bit gamey.
 
2013-06-27 05:30:53 PM

Bukharin: iheartscotch: Dogs is better people than people.

People are a bit gamey.


Indeed.
 
2013-06-27 05:32:18 PM
I don't always eat dead puppies, but when I do, I bury them first.
 
2013-06-27 05:32:43 PM
Stop anthropomorphizing your dogs, they hate that!
 
2013-06-27 05:34:26 PM
Your dog wants dog.
 
2013-06-27 05:35:44 PM

Spam Pajamas: When I was growing up I was at a friend's house who had a huge pit bull. The little old lady next door had a Chihuahua. One day while we were on his porch his dog came up with the Chihuahua in his mouth and it was dead. We panicked. We figured maybe we could just reattach it to its leash and hope the little old lady thought her dog died on its own. A few hours later we hear her screaming! We run over and she's holding her dead dog. She asked who would do such a thing? We said it looks like it died on its own. She said "It died two days ago. Someone dug it up and reattached it to its leash!"


Provided it's true, THAT is a CSB.
 
2013-06-27 05:39:31 PM

Shrink: Spam Pajamas: When I was growing up I was at a friend's house who had a huge pit bull. The little old lady next door had a Chihuahua. One day while we were on his porch his dog came up with the Chihuahua in his mouth and it was dead. We panicked. We figured maybe we could just reattach it to its leash and hope the little old lady thought her dog died on its own. A few hours later we hear her screaming! We run over and she's holding her dead dog. She asked who would do such a thing? We said it looks like it died on its own. She said "It died two days ago. Someone dug it up and reattached it to its leash!"

Provided it's true, THAT is a CSB.


That joke has been around longer than dirt.
 
2013-06-27 05:40:01 PM

meat0918: Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.

Given the internet tears that have been shed, yes, yes they did.


reillan: Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Yes.  based purely on comments, it seems like MOST people thought it was grief.


And look, I don't doubt that dogs are capable of feeling emotion.  But this is a complex behavior, and animals don't carry out complex behaviors except by instinct -- instinct that evolves or is bred over a long period of time.  For example, burying stuff to eat/chew up later.  So, even if this dog is terribly sad to see another dog dead, it cannot possibly be going through the exercise of (1) translating that sadness into a conscious decision to give the dog a dignified farewell, (2) deciding that a dignified farewell consists of a burial, and then (3) acting on it.
 
2013-06-27 05:42:51 PM
The Christian Post calls the act "compassionate." The Huffington Post labels it an "astounding act of mourning," and suggests, "If you didn't believe animals have the capability to grieve like people do, you might now change your mind."

Uhm, no I won't? Because dogs aren't people, you 'tard. We bury our dead because of stupid religious (and intelligent sanitary) reasons. Dogs don't think that way. Anyone who believes dogs do think that way is anthropomorphizing them.

This is like that video with the cat that was "giving CPR" to the other cat. Right. Uh huh. Because cats r doctors.

t.qkme.me
 
2013-06-27 05:45:51 PM
One thing that often gets overlooked in these "that dog isn't doing what we think he's doing" stories is the fact that dogs are a subspecies entirely created by human beings.  They've been selectively bred to act according to our preferences.   Dogs simply don't behave in the same ways that wolves or foxes do.

I'm not, by the way, claiming that this guy is wrong.  I'm just saying that "I know what that dog is doing because other beasts do something similar" isn't very convincing.
 
2013-06-27 05:47:12 PM
At least now we know that this dog (daily fail warning) was provided well for for at least 6 years after his owner died.
 
2013-06-27 05:47:16 PM

Ral: Well duh.  Dogs don't bury their dead.  That's ridiculous.


Do they eat their dead? I've never heard of dog cannibalism before.
 
2013-06-27 05:50:06 PM

Spam Pajamas: When I was growing up I was at a friend's house who had a huge pit bull. The little old lady next door had a Chihuahua. One day while we were on his porch his dog came up with the Chihuahua in his mouth and it was dead. We panicked. We figured maybe we could just reattach it to its leash and hope the little old lady thought her dog died on its own. A few hours later we hear her screaming! We run over and she's holding her dead dog. She asked who would do such a thing? We said it looks like it died on its own. She said "It died two days ago. Someone dug it up and reattached it to its leash!"


As always, Mama's Family is relevant:

Cat's meow.
 
2013-06-27 05:50:47 PM
List time I checked animals were still infact animals and not humans,

/Furry
 
2013-06-27 05:51:45 PM

eraser8: One thing that often gets overlooked in these "that dog isn't doing what we think he's doing" stories is the fact that dogs are a subspecies entirely created by human beings.  They've been selectively bred to act according to our preferences.   Dogs simply don't behave in the same ways that wolves or foxes do.

I'm not, by the way, claiming that this guy is wrong.  I'm just saying that "I know what that dog is doing because other beasts do something similar" isn't very convincing.


Fair enough, but this argument would go further if there were evidence of a breed of dog ever having been bred to bury deceased dogs.  Or, short of that, evidence of dogs having regularly engaged in this behavior before, because any trait that doesn't manifest itself won't stay latent for long; it will just die out.
 
2013-06-27 05:52:23 PM
 
2013-06-27 05:53:24 PM

Highroller48: Your dog wants dog.


Heh heh
 
2013-06-27 05:58:18 PM
Meat is meat, and a dogs gotta eat.
 
2013-06-27 06:00:06 PM

Super Chronic: eraser8: One thing that often gets overlooked in these "that dog isn't doing what we think he's doing" stories is the fact that dogs are a subspecies entirely created by human beings.  They've been selectively bred to act according to our preferences.   Dogs simply don't behave in the same ways that wolves or foxes do.

I'm not, by the way, claiming that this guy is wrong.  I'm just saying that "I know what that dog is doing because other beasts do something similar" isn't very convincing.

Fair enough, but this argument...


My argument is simply that we shouldn't be quick to assume a rationale behind dog behavior.

Serious dog behavioral studies began only recently.  It wasn't until a few years ago, for example, that scientists discovered that humans are able to nonverbally communicate with dogs in a way that eludes our closest genetic cousins, chimpanzees (and, dogs' closest relative, the wolf). This, by the way, is true from puppyhood...so, it's not just a matter of training.
 
2013-06-27 06:02:04 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Obligatory


Dead people, on the other hand, are a hoot:

www.familysecuritymatters.org
 
2013-06-27 06:03:28 PM

Super Chronic: Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.


It's a Riyadhi camel heeler.
 
2013-06-27 06:04:02 PM
Dogs bury a lot of things.

Dogs do not pray. They prey, they don't pray.
 
2013-06-27 06:04:16 PM
The Obvious tag has been dug up and eaten
 
2013-06-27 06:05:17 PM
And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source.
 
2013-06-27 06:05:50 PM

Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.


Human emotional stupidity knows now bounds.

Where's Ric Romero when you need him?

Would have been great for him to do a story on the actual tendencies of dogs to bury/hoard their food/chewtoys.
 
2013-06-27 06:06:48 PM

omeganuepsilon: Human emotional stupidity knows no bounds.


That's better.
 
2013-06-27 06:08:08 PM
One of my huskies used to bury the groundhogs she killed, but she never mauled or tore them up.  Then the charming job was to disinter them once she was back inside, to prevent her going back to revoltingly decayed corpses later.  My other one simply used to bring me whatever critters she had snagged.
 
2013-06-27 06:09:23 PM

brap: buckets_of_fun: So the morale of the story is dead puppies are delicious?

No, the morale of the story is low.
The morel of the story is an edible mushroom found in early spring.
The moral of the story is, a dog may not know why it buries a pup, but it may a cur to it later.


I'll facepalm myself in the corner.  Thanks.
 
2013-06-27 06:14:04 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source.


Studies have shown that dogs receive a "hit" of oxytocin when they come into affectionate contact with their human.  The human, by the way, also receives a hit..similar to the one a human mother gets when she breast feeds her baby.
 
2013-06-27 06:14:45 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source.


It might have something to do with that, but it might also have something to do with the fact that dogs are a subspecies of the grey wolf which is a social animal that uses physical contact to establish and maintain familial bonds.
 
2013-06-27 06:15:30 PM
Cold dog
 
2013-06-27 06:15:50 PM

kg2095: Ral: Well duh.  Dogs don't bury their dead.  That's ridiculous.

Do they eat their dead? I've never heard of dog cannibalism before.


They'll eat anything if they're hungry enough.  Or just because it'll fit in their mouth.

eraser8: One thing that often gets overlooked in these "that dog isn't doing what we think he's doing" stories is the fact that dogs are a subspecies entirely created by human beings.  They've been selectively bred to act according to our preferences.   Dogs simply don't behave in the same ways that wolves or foxes do.

I'm not, by the way, claiming that this guy is wrong.  I'm just saying that "I know what that dog is doing because other beasts do something similar" isn't very convincing.


Dogs are known for burying bones.  It was even in cartoons.  Why do you think they bury it?  You think this stupid animal is capable of performing some symbolic act of mourning?  Elephants, which are clearly far more intelligent, will mourn for other elephants but even they don't express it in abstract means.  You're looking at a cloud and your human mind is telling you that it looks like a smiley face.  It isn't actually a face.
 
2013-06-27 06:17:22 PM

buckets_of_fun: So the morale of the story is dead puppies are delicious?


No. Dead puppies aren't much fun.
 
2013-06-27 06:20:25 PM
There's no immediate intuitive connection between being sad that someone is dead and buying them in the ground. If an animal were capable of grieving, why on earth would it occur to them to bury the dead?
 
2013-06-27 06:21:12 PM

burning_bridge: kg2095: Ral: Well duh.  Dogs don't bury their dead.  That's ridiculous.

Do they eat their dead? I've never heard of dog cannibalism before.

They'll eat anything if they're hungry enough.  Or just because it'll fit in their mouth.

eraser8: One thing that often gets overlooked in these "that dog isn't doing what we think he's doing" stories is the fact that dogs are a subspecies entirely created by human beings.  They've been selectively bred to act according to our preferences.   Dogs simply don't behave in the same ways that wolves or foxes do.

I'm not, by the way, claiming that this guy is wrong.  I'm just saying that "I know what that dog is doing because other beasts do something similar" isn't very convincing.

Dogs are known for burying bones.  It was even in cartoons.  Why do you think they bury it?  You think this stupid animal is capable of performing some symbolic act of mourning?  Elephants, which are clearly far more intelligent, will mourn for other elephants but even they don't express it in abstract means.  You're looking at a cloud and your human mind is telling you that it looks like a smiley face.  It isn't actually a face.


www.tacojohns.com
OMG, It's smiling at me!

/ Stolen from a current TFD thread.
 
2013-06-27 06:21:14 PM

burning_bridge: You think this stupid animal is capable of performing some symbolic act of mourning?


I have absolutely no idea.  But, I'm not willing to disregard the hypothesis before it's actually tested.

burning_bridge: Elephants, which are clearly far more intelligent, will mourn for other elephants but even they don't express it in abstract means.


And, chimpanzees, quite intelligent and our closest genetic relative, are not able to understand human thinking as well as dogs are.
 
2013-06-27 06:31:43 PM
When I was a kid, I saw a dog do the same thing with a dead possum.
 
2013-06-27 06:35:57 PM

Super Chronic: Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?


Why not? Lots of animals engage in behaviors that are best described as grieving rituals.

Oh... right... because everyone on the internet is totally hardcore and nothing can possibly be nice or sad....
 
2013-06-27 06:36:38 PM

eraser8: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source.

Studies have shown that dogs receive a "hit" of oxytocin when they come into affectionate contact with their human.  The human, by the way, also receives a hit..similar to the one a human mother gets when she breast feeds her baby.


JesseL: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source.

It might have something to do with that, but it might also have something to do with the fact that dogs are a subspecies of the grey wolf which is a social animal that uses physical contact to establish and maintain familial bonds.


People humanize their pets all the time, I think, was what he was saying.

Yeah, dogs can love an individual...cuddle for closeness to that person.

But they also can do this with complete strangers, leaving the (humanizing)owner feeling abandoned and neglected.

It's a dog, not a person.  It is a pack animal, and outside normal human boundaries and concepts of love.

Most dogs treat ALL humans the same general way unless they feel threatened(bark at everyone, cuddle with everyone, playful with everyone, beg for attention to anyone that will give it).  Unless a reason comes along for them to treat that person differently.
 
2013-06-27 06:39:15 PM
Ah, personification.  I suspected the dog was saving it for later when I saw the video.  There was a similar video a couple years back of a cat 'massaging' a dead cat.  It was clear to anyone who knew anything about cat behavior that the dead cat had been in heat, but anyone suggesting necrophilia was at play was shouted down in the comments.
 
2013-06-27 06:43:39 PM

Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.


People get offended at eating horse. So to answer your question. People are idiots when it comes to animals.
 
2013-06-27 06:44:40 PM
I grok that

/obscure?
 
2013-06-27 06:46:13 PM
To cite my experience as a dog owner, I can say for a fact that dogs do experience and express various emotions, often more complex than people would expect.  We have Australian Shepherds, they are very intelligent dogs, and very good at solving problems, and making connections between their actions and their consequences, as well as anticipating our response to them...

When our dog detects that we're leaving for a few hours, she walks around the house with her head held low, sits on her "moping chair" and gives us very sad puppy eyes, then proceeds to place her muzzle in the door so we can't close it without pushing her face back inside.  I honestly believe she genuinely gets upset when we leave.

That said, she doesn't write us letters expressing this problem, nor does she do anything else that a human might think of to try in her situation.  I'm pretty sure she'd be sad if one of our other dogs died, but she's not going to bury them.

Dogs don't express emotions like humans do, nor do they cope with things the way we do.  When she gets really upset about us leaving, she'll make a mess out of something so we have to clean it up first, that's pretty much a dog-solution to a problem, she doesn't try to reason with us.
 
2013-06-27 06:46:23 PM

omeganuepsilon: Yeah, dogs can love an individual...cuddle for closeness to that person.

But they also can do this with complete strangers, leaving the (humanizing)owner feeling abandoned and neglected.

It's a dog, not a person.  It is a pack animal, and outside normal human boundaries and concepts of love.


Did you bother to watch the vid at the link?

We do know that the dog's brain is flooded with oxytocin when it comes into affectionate contact with its human.  What I don't personally know is whether the experimenters had a control group to determine whether the neurochemical release is unique between a dog and a familial human or whether all humans prompt this response.  I would hope that the researchers would have utilized a control group...but, I don't know that they did.

In any case, your position seems to be one from personal incredulity (that is, "I can't conceive of it; therefore, it must be false").  My position is, let's test the hypothesis to determine whether it's credible.
 
2013-06-27 06:47:12 PM
Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom:


"And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source."

Add to that it licks your mouth because it is "kissing" you. Not because you have food particles lingering in your teeth.
 
2013-06-27 06:48:34 PM

buckets_of_fun: So the morale of the story is dead puppies are delicious?


Mama says puppie's days are through
she's gonna put him in the stew
 
2013-06-27 06:49:53 PM

Spam Pajamas: When I was growing up I was at a friend's house who had a huge pit bull. The little old lady next door had a Chihuahua. One day while we were on his porch his dog came up with the Chihuahua in his mouth and it was dead. We panicked. We figured maybe we could just reattach it to its leash and hope the little old lady thought her dog died on its own. A few hours later we hear her screaming! We run over and she's holding her dead dog. She asked who would do such a thing? We said it looks like it died on its own. She said "It died two days ago. Someone dug it up and reattached it to its leash!"


even if this story is B.S. in my mind it is true. excellent.
 
2013-06-27 06:54:02 PM
Free puppy?
 
2013-06-27 06:54:41 PM

omeganuepsilon: People humanize their pets all the time, I think, was what he was saying.

Yeah, dogs can love an individual...cuddle for closeness to that person.

But they also can do this with complete strangers, leaving the (humanizing)owner feeling abandoned and neglected.


That doesn't sound entirely different from human behavior. People should know better than to excessively anthropomorphize dogs, but I think sometimes we give ourselves a bit too much credit too.

/I recall giving an English teacher fits by pointing out the "Man's inhumanity to man" is at first glance a contradictory phrase, suggesting that humanity is something man only aspires to.
 
2013-06-27 07:07:34 PM

JesseL: omeganuepsilon: People humanize their pets all the time, I think, was what he was saying.

Yeah, dogs can love an individual...cuddle for closeness to that person.

But they also can do this with complete strangers, leaving the (humanizing)owner feeling abandoned and neglected.

That doesn't sound entirely different from human behavior. People should know better than to excessively anthropomorphize dogs, but I think sometimes we give ourselves a bit too much credit too.


Sometimes?  heh

eraser8: Did you bother to watch the vid at the link?


No, but I also wasn't' contradicting you, no need to be an ass.

I was simply stating a real phenomenon.  A lot of people do humanize their pets, and animals at large even.  That does not mean dogs do not become attached, I flat out stated they do.  But it's not always the case, trying to put it in human terms as an absolute for all dogs won't work.
 
2013-06-27 07:11:18 PM
Buryin is fine, just don't let them start putting us down behind the barn.
 
2013-06-27 07:14:50 PM

JesseL: I recall giving an English teacher fits by pointing out the "Man's inhumanity to man" is at first glance a contradictory phrase, suggesting that humanity is something man only aspires to.


If that gave your English teacher fits, they weren't an English teacher.
 
2013-06-27 07:20:44 PM

doglover: JesseL: I recall giving an English teacher fits by pointing out the "Man's inhumanity to man" is at first glance a contradictory phrase, suggesting that humanity is something man only aspires to.

If that gave your English teacher fits, they weren't an English teacher.


I won't disagree. She wasn't the dimmest teacher I had in high school though.
 
2013-06-27 07:21:05 PM
Biffer Biffer Helluva Sniffer
 
2013-06-27 07:22:01 PM
It's a dog-eat-dog world out there...
 
2013-06-27 07:29:54 PM

omeganuepsilon: That does not mean dogs do not become attached, I flat out stated they do.  But it's not always the case, trying to put it in human terms as an absolute for all dogs won't work.


And, some human mothers don't become attached to their children; some human children don't become attached to their mothers.  That doesn't change the fact that there is demonstrated biological basis for maternal love.

I wasn't trying to be an ass. I was just pointing out that experiment has shown that dogs receive the same sort of boost of the same neurochemical that human mothers experience when they breastfeed.

I was quite open about the fact that I don't know whether this "high" is limited to humans the dog is previously bonded with or whether it occurs in most human-dog interactions, regardless of familiarity.  The truth is, I simply don't know what the correct answer is. So, when people pretend that they do know the reasons for these behaviors, I'll grant you that I can be a little dickish.  It isn't intentional.
 
2013-06-27 07:30:56 PM

JesseL: doglover: JesseL: I recall giving an English teacher fits by pointing out the "Man's inhumanity to man" is at first glance a contradictory phrase, suggesting that humanity is something man only aspires to.

If that gave your English teacher fits, they weren't an English teacher.

I won't disagree. She wasn't the dimmest teacher I had in high school though.


It's usually a matter of "We have X teachers and Y subjects where X is less than Y. "

Universities can afford to hire lit teachers to teach lit. High schools take the available teachers and whack up the available topics.
 
2013-06-27 07:37:04 PM

Mitch Taylor's Bro: burning_bridge: kg2095: Ral: Well duh.  Dogs don't bury their dead.  That's ridiculous.

Do they eat their dead? I've never heard of dog cannibalism before.

They'll eat anything if they're hungry enough.  Or just because it'll fit in their mouth.

eraser8: One thing that often gets overlooked in these "that dog isn't doing what we think he's doing" stories is the fact that dogs are a subspecies entirely created by human beings.  They've been selectively bred to act according to our preferences.   Dogs simply don't behave in the same ways that wolves or foxes do.

I'm not, by the way, claiming that this guy is wrong.  I'm just saying that "I know what that dog is doing because other beasts do something similar" isn't very convincing.

Dogs are known for burying bones.  It was even in cartoons.  Why do you think they bury it?  You think this stupid animal is capable of performing some symbolic act of mourning?  Elephants, which are clearly far more intelligent, will mourn for other elephants but even they don't express it in abstract means.  You're looking at a cloud and your human mind is telling you that it looks like a smiley face.  It isn't actually a face.

[www.tacojohns.com image 716x541]
OMG, It's smiling at me!



looks like Jennifer
 
2013-06-27 07:42:23 PM

eraser8: That doesn't change the fact that there is demonstrated biological basis for maternal love.


It's that phrasing.  "That doesn't change"

I never tried to change anything.

I'm on the ground between "He loves me" and "He doesn't love you"

Me might, he might not, either is a possibility as each does exist in reality.  I was not attempting to lay down any absolute, but contradict what I saw as an implication of one.

"The weather is hot"
"Today it is, tomorrow may be different."
"That doesn't change that it's hot out!  The thermometer SAYS it's 98 degrees, it right there, are you blind?"

/that's how it rolled out to me

eraser8: I'll grant you that I can be a little dickish.  It isn't intentional.


likewise
 
2013-06-27 07:46:43 PM
gunshowcomic.com
 
2013-06-27 07:47:56 PM

burning_bridge: Elephants, which are clearly far more intelligent, will mourn for other elephants but even they don't express it in abstract means.


Incorrect. Among other things, elephants bury the dead.
 
2013-06-27 07:52:18 PM
Don't anthropomorphize animals. They hate that.
 
2013-06-27 08:02:57 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source.


I don't believe that my dogs are capable of love in any sense relating to the human emotion, but I strongly doubt that the one who up-ended a cooler full of ice water which he then lay in (he's a Spitz and a moron), with air temperatures in the 40s, snuggles me for warmth. Something to do with pack safety, maybe?
 
2013-06-27 08:08:48 PM
Disney films are not documentaries, reality is brutal. Just ask Timothy Treadwell.
 
2013-06-27 08:14:21 PM

Inigo: [gunshowcomic.com image 700x1149]


Hahaha... That reminds me of a friend's dog who used to bury all her treats in the yard for later. Including her favorite treat: ice cubes.
 
2013-06-27 08:19:51 PM

FarkinNortherner: Something to do with pack safety, maybe?


When one wakes up, they all wake up. Advantageous.
 
2013-06-27 08:21:26 PM

brap: buckets_of_fun: So the morale of the story is dead puppies are delicious?

No, the morale of the story is low.
The morel of the story is an edible mushroom found in early spring.
The moral of the story is, a dog may not know why it buries a pup, but it may a cur to it later.


Best use of a pun I've seen in a while.

*tosses you a snausage*
 
2013-06-27 08:30:06 PM
one more time for Roman Hruska!
 
2013-06-27 08:32:35 PM
Of course it has to be something like that. The idea animals aren't just meat robots god put here for us to exploit, and might have emotions just like us, is ridiculous.

And now here are a bunch of scientists.
 
2013-06-27 08:40:06 PM
I mean, we humans tower godlike over everything. Just watch TV to see how incredible we are.

Animals don't even manufacture and adore products.
 
2013-06-27 08:40:47 PM
When I was a child, my beagle had pups. One died after a fall. I remember watching the dog bury her pup.

I think a mama dog will bury her dead pup to avoid attracting predators to her live pups.
 
2013-06-27 08:42:46 PM

J. Frank Parnell: Of course it has to be something like that. The idea animals aren't just meat robots god put here for us to exploit, and might have emotions just like us, is ridiculous.

And now here are a bunch of scientists.


Not sure if PETA, ALF, or Vegan.
 
2013-06-27 08:43:36 PM

FarkinNortherner: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source.

I don't believe that my dogs are capable of love in any sense relating to the human emotion, but I strongly doubt that the one who up-ended a cooler full of ice water which he then lay in (he's a Spitz and a moron), with air temperatures in the 40s, snuggles me for warmth. Something to do with pack safety, maybe?


Maybe you're just a good snuggler :)
 
2013-06-27 08:46:33 PM

omeganuepsilon: Not sure if PETA, ALF, or Vegan.


Nope, but i must have touched a nerve there. Don't worry, man. You're more important to god than all those filthy animals. I didn't mean to upset your christian sensibilities.
 
2013-06-27 08:54:17 PM
I had a dog that used to do this with wildlife it caught.  We fed it fine so it never went back for some things that were a joy to come across.  Most looked like a grisly crime scene.  Fur and tenderized flesh sliding off of a mound of meat.  I'm sure that dog was hoping to come back in a week and find some ground stew.
 
2013-06-27 09:01:47 PM

Kejlina: When I was a child, my beagle had pups. One died after a fall. I remember watching the dog bury her pup.

I think a mama dog will bury her dead pup to avoid attracting predators to her live pups.


That's the other obvious answer.

Well, rather, it may be an instinct that helped them in the past, not that it's consciously done.

In fact, it's akin to why we do it.  We don't bury out of respect, we started burying and made it into a ritual.

Some tried to keep it in the house with them, but they get sick when the bloated corpse bursts...and learn, eventually "Oh...so  that's why everyone else buries them!"  Eventually wisdom is handed down and people stop  holding onto the dead in the literal sense.

It's simply more sanitary.  Kinda like not shiatting in your kitchen.

We don't even need to think about it, we just go as far away as possible, and poop.  Because poop stinks.
Some dogs do the same, and quite obviously, some will not.  Some will attempt to eat their own poop. So, like humans, some are smarter than others.

We bury our refuse for the same reasons.  We know it draws animals, is unpleasant to sight and smell.

Dogs cannot hand down that wisdom the way we can(well, we can in theory...), so they repeat mistakes, and on occasion when instinct gives them the impetus to bury something, people try to find meaning in it,  because, god.

/shakes head
 
2013-06-27 09:02:12 PM

trappedspirit: I had a dog that used to do this with wildlife it caught.  We fed it fine so it never went back for some things that were a joy to come across.  Most looked like a grisly crime scene.  Fur and tenderized flesh sliding off of a mound of meat.  I'm sure that dog was hoping to come back in a week and find some ground stew.


So you were digging up things the dog buried and never went back for, or are talking about things it killed and didn't bury?
 
2013-06-27 09:04:33 PM

J. Frank Parnell: omeganuepsilon: Not sure if PETA, ALF, or Vegan.

Nope, but i must have touched a nerve there. Don't worry, man. You're more important to god than all those filthy animals. I didn't mean to upset your christian sensibilities.


Because I don't irrationally humanize animals, I have christian sensibilities?

That is rich.

You may want to check my last post.  I did talk about god, but not quite in the way you're assuming.
 
2013-06-27 09:07:50 PM

J. Frank Parnell: trappedspirit: I had a dog that used to do this with wildlife it caught.  We fed it fine so it never went back for some things that were a joy to come across.  Most looked like a grisly crime scene.  Fur and tenderized flesh sliding off of a mound of meat.  I'm sure that dog was hoping to come back in a week and find some ground stew.

So you were digging up things the dog buried and never went back for, or are talking about things it killed and didn't bury?


The former.
 
2013-06-27 09:08:59 PM
It is instinctive behavior to bury for dogs.  The instinct is there like spinning before laying down,   My dogs will circle around extra long and slowly when told to lay down and they don't want to, complete with a loud sigh.  Circling before laying down may be an instinctive thing, but in the moment they can express themselves in ways that are not simply anthropomorphic projections.

It doesn't threaten anyone's "soul" or "superior intellect" to admit that our domesticated dogs are capable of communicating at about the level of a two or three year old.

What is it like to be a bat, er ... dog?  That is the question really being raised here.
 
2013-06-27 09:22:59 PM

J. Frank Parnell: Of course it has to be something like that. The idea animals aren't just meat robots god put here for us to exploit, and might have emotions just like us, is ridiculous.

And now here are a bunch of scientists.


The leap from "animals have emotions" to "animals engage in ritualistic grief rituals" is a mighty big one.
 
2013-06-27 09:26:05 PM

omeganuepsilon: Because I don't irrationally humanize animals, I have christian sensibilities?

That is rich.

You may want to check my last post. I did talk about god, but not quite in the way you're assuming.


it's not about humanizing anything. If i were to tell you a crab has legs, would you say that's impossible because humans have legs, and i'm attempting to humanize crabs?

Religious people are often those who treat animals with disrespect. And i guessed that's where you're coming from. But you could still just be a psycho who likes hurting living things, but doing it to humans might get you arrested, so you do it to animals.
 
2013-06-27 09:27:50 PM

Snapper Carr: J. Frank Parnell: Of course it has to be something like that. The idea animals aren't just meat robots god put here for us to exploit, and might have emotions just like us, is ridiculous.

And now here are a bunch of scientists.

The leap from "animals have emotions" to "animals engage in ritualistic grief rituals" is a mighty big one.


This message brought to you by the Department of Redundancy Department
 
2013-06-27 09:39:50 PM
That don't look like no puppy to me.  Looks more like a Lamb!
3.bp.blogspot.com
When humans struggle they will eat whatever they can find. My dog is picky as a mother farker when it comes to eating because he's well fed. He might go bury left overs, but he rarely digs them back up.
 
2013-06-27 09:55:30 PM

Greylight: It doesn't threaten anyone's "soul" or "superior intellect" to admit that our domesticated dogs are capable of communicating at about the level of a two or three year old.


I wouldn't necessarily back that claim.  They're both smart and incredibly retarded in a variety of ways, and that varies dog to dog and child to child.   I don't think they are comparable.  They are similar, but still alien.  A lot of what we "know" is still conjecture, superstition, and flat out guessing.

Not calling the claim a lie, not meaning offense, just calling it misleading and/or not applicable....wrongly confident?  I hope the concept comesacross anyhow...
 
2013-06-27 09:59:50 PM

omeganuepsilon: Greylight: It doesn't threaten anyone's "soul" or "superior intellect" to admit that our domesticated dogs are capable of communicating at about the level of a two or three year old.

I wouldn't necessarily back that claim.  They're both smart and incredibly retarded in a variety of ways, and that varies dog to dog and child to child.   I don't think they are comparable.  They are similar, but still alien.  A lot of what we "know" is still conjecture, superstition, and flat out guessing.

Not calling the claim a lie, not meaning offense, just calling it misleading and/or not applicable....wrongly confident?  I hope the concept comesacross anyhow...


Man is everything a dog looks for in a pack leader: we like to eat meat and love to throw the OMG BALL!
 
2013-06-27 10:13:16 PM

nmemkha: Man is everything a dog looks for in a pack leader: we like to eat meat and love to throw the OMG BALL!


Then you have a child which becomes more important to you than the dog, and you think the dog will protect your child, but instead tears your child into pieces.

Because dogs are loyal to you. And stupid.
 
2013-06-27 10:24:13 PM

J. Frank Parnell: omeganuepsilon: Because I don't irrationally humanize animals, I have christian sensibilities?

That is rich.

You may want to check my last post. I did talk about god, but not quite in the way you're assuming.

it's not about humanizing anything. If i were to tell you a crab has legs, would you say that's impossible because humans have legs, and i'm attempting to humanize crabs?


Why even ask that?
I don't claim the dogs don't have emotions or even love.  I'm saying some do, some don't.  Some are smart bastards, some are lazy farkers you can hardly tell are alive.

Passing off a common burial as ritual(in the quasi-religious emotionally moving sense), though, is as preposterous as god is the answer to why the sun comes up.

 The digging is a mundane activity dogs do all the time.  To assume there's more because it resembles what humans do in this circumstance, is a non sequitur, does not follow.


Just for fun before I take off for a bit(dunno how long)
If I decide to drink tonite, and you decide to drink tonite, do we both do so for the same reasons?

Maybe, but without proof, asserting we now know fact is a falsehood.

I'll let you play the human:
Maybe you just broke up with your SO, maybe you want to have a good time with friends, maybe you want to get pleasantly tipsy and play video games or read, maybe you just wanted to go to bed earlier, or are satisfying a toothache.

I'll play the dog:
Maybe, being as my lineage dating back to the 1700s are all severe addicts, drinking is a chronic problem in my family.  Maybe I have gotten drunk for the last 176 days in a row.

But why do I drink tonite?

I can rationalize whatever I want, but when it comes down to it, because of my history and that of my ancestry, it is a pretty sure bet it is because I think I NEED to, and my body actively yearns for it, the very thought of it excites me, if I had a tail it'd be wagging. if my mouth were open I'd be drooling.  I could open wine bottles in my sleep with muscle memory and reflex.

Base principle of the modern usage of Occam's Razor.
 
2013-06-27 11:13:02 PM
During the first or second season of Big Cat Diary a wild buffalo or something killed a kitten of a lioness's litter.  The lioness promptly ate it, without sharing it with the rest of the litter.  It was her own offspring, but the minute it was dead, that "maternal protective instinct" was no longer there - it was just meat.  The mother did her best to protect them during the attack, but the minute it was over she went all Bobby Knight and "if you aren't performing, you aren't worth shiat."

Wild animals do not do things humans do for the same reasons.  It's just coincidence.  Period.  I don't believe for a minute that a human mother would eat her own baby if she was starving, much less if the baby just happened to be killed by happenstance and it was fresh meat.
 
2013-06-27 11:16:00 PM

kg2095: Ral: Well duh.  Dogs don't bury their dead.  That's ridiculous.

Do they eat their dead? I've never heard of dog cannibalism before.


Anything will eat anything if it's hungry enough usually. Even people.

As far as the dog goes. It may or may not have thought the puppy was a good snack. Or, not being quite that hungry, it may have just buried it because that's what you do with organics around your home/den site. Dogs even kick dirt to help cover their poo (although they're not as picky about it as cats usually are.)

 You don't leave organic matter hanging around where you do. At the very least it's generally not healthy/pleasant. At the worst it invites predators...bigger than you are.
 
2013-06-27 11:20:09 PM

omeganuepsilon: eraser8: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source.

Studies have shown that dogs receive a "hit" of oxytocin when they come into affectionate contact with their human.  The human, by the way, also receives a hit..similar to the one a human mother gets when she breast feeds her baby.

JesseL: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source.

It might have something to do with that, but it might also have something to do with the fact that dogs are a subspecies of the grey wolf which is a social animal that uses physical contact to establish and maintain familial bonds.

People humanize their pets all the time, I think, was what he was saying.

Yeah, dogs can love an individual...cuddle for closeness to that person.

But they also can do this with complete strangers, leaving the (humanizing)owner feeling abandoned and neglected.

It's a dog, not a person.  It is a pack animal, and outside normal human boundaries and concepts of love.

Most dogs treat ALL humans the same general way unless they feel threatened(bark at everyone, cuddle with everyone, playful with everyone, beg for attention to anyone that will give it).  Unless a reason comes along for them to treat that person differently.


Except the periodic dog that pines himself to death after his long time master shuffles off this mortal coil.

/dogs cover a wide range of behavior and thought, just like people.
 
2013-06-27 11:26:27 PM

o'really: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom:


"And when your dog snuggles up to you on the couch, it's because he loves you. It has nothing to do with the fact that you're a heat source."

Add to that it licks your mouth because it is "kissing" you. Not because you have food particles lingering in your teeth.


(annoyed sigh)

 No, it licks your mouth because that's an inborn trait from wolves when they ask older pack members for food as puppies (older wolves then puke it up for them).

 It's also a submissive trait due to that.

/it's one thing to anthropomorphize animals.
//it's equally wrong to subscribe zero behavior reasoning to their actions.
///dogs are not robots with a binary "like" and "dislike" programmed for every action they take.
 
2013-06-27 11:28:35 PM

cuzsis: At the worst it invites predators...bigger than you are.


Here on the farm is the usual progression:  something big dies, like a deer that got hit by a car and made it onto the property.  If you leave it, the crows come first, then the turkey vultures.  Those attract the bobcats and the errant hunting dog that has been lost since last year.  Eventually the field mice and rats show up, and those attract the owls, eagles, snakes, and any feral cat within a 200 mile radius.

If any of this is done within earshot or a visible view of our dog, she barks.  And barks.  And barks.  It can take three weeks for a full size deer carcass to eventually get to the level I can run over it with the tractor and turn it into mulch for the yard, and as long as there is another animal around still investigating it, the dog barks.

I can easily see why a dog would bury a dead anything.  Wild dogs do not like other wildlife invading their territory.  A dead animal is like a giant batman light for all other wild animals.
 
2013-06-27 11:34:21 PM

Lsherm: During the first or second season of Big Cat Diary a wild buffalo or something killed a kitten of a lioness's litter.  The lioness promptly ate it, without sharing it with the rest of the litter.  It was her own offspring, but the minute it was dead, that "maternal protective instinct" was no longer there - it was just meat.  The mother did her best to protect them during the attack, but the minute it was over she went all Bobby Knight and "if you aren't performing, you aren't worth shiat."

Wild animals do not do things humans do for the same reasons.  It's just coincidence.  Period.  I don't believe for a minute that a human mother would eat her own baby if she was starving, much less if the baby just happened to be killed by happenstance and it was fresh meat.


Yeah, lions are kind of known for that. I haven't seen it documented regularly in wolves yet. I would be curious to see if they shared the same trait or not. I know they will eat newborn puppies if they are stillborn, or sometimes bury them. That's more of a "keeping the den clean" action though.

 Dogs will sometimes howl when other dogs (pack members) die. I'm pretty sure I've heard of this in wolves too. It's been a long time though, I'd need to go back and do some re-reading.
 
2013-06-27 11:51:37 PM

Voiceofreason01: I grok that

/obscure?


Not at all, Mr. Smith.
 
2013-06-28 12:00:48 AM
cuzsis-
Why the
(annoyed sigh)?

I was basically saying the same thing as you.
 
2013-06-28 02:08:07 AM
That's exactly what I told my wife when she made me watch that.I thought it was amazing that so many people would be watching that thinking "Awww. How cute"
 
2013-06-28 03:03:47 AM
i.qkme.me
 
2013-06-28 03:19:17 AM

cuzsis: Except the periodic dog that pines himself to death after his long time master shuffles off this mortal coil.

/dogs cover a wide range of behavior and thought, just like people.


That's rare if not outright mythical.

Hyper attached dogs will tend to wait in doorways for the master to return, or sleep on their bed every night, or even on the graves of their former owners though, sometimes for a really really long time.(days weeks months, maybe more).

Not sure even that's love though.  Can be explained with dependancy on the alpha and regular anxiety of knowing something is wrong but not knowing what exactly, only that the leader is gone.

The vigilance could have served through evolution as a an alertness.  "The big guy is gone, I'd better keep a lookout now that he's not around to protect us."  Many dogs sit at windows and doorways the whole day the owner is at work, for example. When the alpha leaves, and is gone long enough, they may try to find him.  I think the "mourning" is just the common separation anxiety not being resolved.

My current dog does it.  he know's part of the pack is gone and is not completely whole till they come back. But when we take him to my sister's to dogsit if we need to go somewhere for a few days, and then leave, he settles right in, no anxiety(except for pissing on things in new territory and such conflict with their dog).

Sure, it's bonding, maybe even love, but I'd just about bet that if another alpha(proper) came around the "mourning" would be over fairly quick.  IIRC, when an alpha position in an actual group of pack animals, loyalties shift pretty fast, and no signs are really seen about loss to the exiled one.(when it goes that way). During the fight they're all on edge "omg omg omg omg" the new guy wins, and the plop back down or run the weak one out if he didn't already go.

I don't think it's love as we understand it, so using the term is disingenuous or misleading, imo.
Unwavering loyalty, until dethroned, and then unwavering loyalty again to the new guy.

As I said, alien, different.  sure, they have oxytocin and all the same hormones, but they do slightly different things in the different brain, to the consciousness and the subconsciousness.

Trying to define all that in human terms is anthropomorphizing, maybe even a kind of conceited projection, but not so much any real empathy.
 
2013-06-28 03:27:50 AM

omeganuepsilon: Trying to define all that in human terms is anthropomorphizing,


Worded that wrong, blech, past my bedtime.

Trying to shoehorn them into human proprieties is anthromorphizing.
They evolved in packs completely independant from us from a branch pretty far removed from our own.

Define in human terms where you can, but words like alpha had to be loaned out to describe the hierarchy, because we didn't quite have the term needed.  THAT was a leap in understanding pack animals.  Sure, we can pretend human's had it a very very long time ago, but it's been so long we have no memories of it. We had to generate new information by observation and are winging it even today.

If we ever meet an actual intelligent alien, we're hosed.
 
2013-06-28 04:46:01 AM
What I want to know is how the animal instinct to bury food for later use relates to our burial practices. Sure, today no one is thinking of food, but do we know how long burials have been going on for? Was it even our Homo Sapiens Sapiens ancestors who started it? How far back in the lineage of man does the practice of burial go? At what point did it go from an instinctive thing to a conscious, ritualistic and solemn act?

Or is it completely unrelated?
 
2013-06-28 05:59:30 AM
It's worth remembering that burial of the dead isn't universal among humans. Other cultures do everything from burning the dead to laying them out in open-air towers to be eaten by scavenger birds.
 
2013-06-28 07:11:12 AM
Well, if the surviving dog needs food, what's the problem with that?
 
2013-06-28 07:24:15 AM

eraser8: burning_bridge: You think this stupid animal is capable of performing some symbolic act of mourning?

I have absolutely no idea.  But, I'm not willing to disregard the hypothesis before it's actually tested.

burning_bridge: Elephants, which are clearly far more intelligent, will mourn for other elephants but even they don't express it in abstract means.

And, chimpanzees, quite intelligent and our closest genetic relative, are not able to understand human thinking as well as dogs are.


That is an excellent video, especially as you were able to start it at its starting point as it pertains to this thread.  Kudos.
 
2013-06-28 08:59:07 AM

Voiceofreason01: I grok that

/obscure?


Shoot yourself.
 
2013-06-28 09:20:07 AM
i211.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-28 09:52:24 AM
Can't see how anyone at all familiar with dogs could've mistaken this for grieving.  The dog's just workmanlike about it, and using the sniff test to tell him what parts still need covering.  There's no social sniffing or even curiosity sniffing.  He's smelled carrion from a distance and is just burying it.
 
2013-06-28 03:25:17 PM

Rapmaster2000: Tumunga: Super Chronic: I hadn't seen this until just now, but my response is.... duh.  Did anyone really think a dog was engaging in a spontaneous grieving ritual?

Anyway, curious to know what kind of dog that is.  Looks sorta like a Brittany, though with darker spots.

The Libtards at HuffPo do.

2/10.  No one uses libtard in a non-ironic fashion.


It was ironically non-ironic.
 
2013-06-28 11:13:58 PM
Ironically, this is the last post.
 
2013-06-28 11:28:25 PM

WTFDYW: Ironically, this is the last post.


Wut?
 
Displayed 139 of 139 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report