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(WTKR)   Researchers may have solved oldest unsolved murder in Colonial America. Colonel Mustard last seen running for the border   (wtkr.com) divider line 27
    More: Interesting, Colonial America, unsolved murders, Jamestown, borders  
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5324 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jun 2013 at 10:01 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-27 10:04:10 AM
In the 20 years or so of playing Clue, I've never seen Colonel Mustard do it once.

Miss Scarlet on the other hand, is a murderous biatch.
 
2013-06-27 10:06:42 AM
John, Paul and Ringo wanted for questioning
 
2013-06-27 10:08:55 AM
Subby needs to get off my lawn for missing the obvious "we now know who shot JR" angle.
 
2013-06-27 10:09:09 AM

Pardon Me Sultan: John, Paul and Ringo wanted for questioning


What about George?
 
2013-06-27 10:12:39 AM
How is this "unsolved?"  If they know there was a duel, they know who participated.
 
2013-06-27 10:13:00 AM

theotherles: Pardon Me Sultan: John, Paul and Ringo wanted for questioning

What about George?


They are Curious, George ain't talking.
 
2013-06-27 10:23:36 AM

Raug the Dwarf: In the 20 years or so of playing Clue, I've never seen Colonel Mustard do it once.

Miss Scarlet on the other hand, is a murderous biatch.


I'm just a guest!
 
2013-06-27 10:28:50 AM
If this was a duel, both parties were willing participants.
That would mean this wasn't a "legitimate murder".
 
2013-06-27 10:29:37 AM
I was a colonist like you until I took a bullet to the knee.
 
2013-06-27 10:34:14 AM
'However, the true identity of the colonist remained unknown.'

So, in essence, they haven't solved shiat.  Great story.
 
2013-06-27 10:37:57 AM
Is this the first time where "Old news is exciting!" truly applies?
 
2013-06-27 10:41:08 AM

gnosis301: Raug the Dwarf: In the 20 years or so of playing Clue, I've never seen Colonel Mustard do it once.

Miss Scarlet on the other hand, is a murderous biatch.

I'm just a guest!


But here's what really happened...
 
2013-06-27 10:57:14 AM

reillan: gnosis301: Raug the Dwarf: In the 20 years or so of playing Clue, I've never seen Colonel Mustard do it once.

Miss Scarlet on the other hand, is a murderous biatch.

I'm just a guest!

But here's what really happened...


Or it could have gone like this......
 
2013-06-27 11:14:06 AM
Subby's headline tells us that researchers may have solved the oldest unsolved murder in Colonial America.

The article's headline tells us that researchers may have solved the oldest unsolved murder in Colonial America.

The embedded video's title tells us that researchers may have solved the oldest unsolved murder in Colonial America.

The first line of the article tells us that researchers may have solved the oldest unsolved murder in Colonial America.

Thank God that's been cleared up.

But then there's this. The researchers didn't know it was a murder until they learned of the duel -- there are other ways to be shot other than murder, you know. So the moment they learned about the duel and decided that the body belonged to the loser of that duel is the exact same moment that they knew the body belonged to a murder victim, as well as the exact same moment that they "solved" that murder.

And let's not forget that this murder was only unsolved from the perspective of researchers hundreds of years after the fact. The Jamestown colonists knew exactly what happened when it happened. They knew of the duel, they knew who was involved, and so there was nothing unsolved about it to them. Does a solved murder suddenly become unsolved when ignorant people decide to violate the grave of its victim? And does it suddenly become solved again when those ignorant people find documentation that explains what happened? Does it count as solving a murder when you "discover" written accounts of the murder, read them, and comprehend them?

In other words, can I go to a cemetery, write down the names on the grave markers, research them, find one that belongs to a murder victim, find a newspaper article that says who killed the victim, and then announce that I've solved an unsolved murder?
 
2013-06-27 11:35:30 AM

id10ts: If this was a duel, both parties were willing participants.
That would mean this wasn't a "legitimate murder".


The use of the word "murder" is often confused with homicide. I think that was the case with this story.
 
2013-06-27 11:40:09 AM
That must have sucked to die like that. Infection from the wound seems to be slow and painful.
 
2013-06-27 11:50:27 AM
Anybody have any comments regarding the following:

"One doubt is due to the type of bullet.
"That's a combat round. It's almost like a shotgun but it also has a main bullet. So you wouldn't think unless somebody was cheating in the duel that they would have that kind of a load," Kelso says."


I'm not sure what the researcher is trying to describe here.  I've never heard of anything other than a lead ball being used in a muzzle loading pistol.  Cure me of my ignorance, Fark historians!
 
2013-06-27 12:06:09 PM

groppet: That must have sucked to die like that. Infection from the wound seems to be slow and painful.


I'm not sure this guy was alive for the days required to die of infection.  I say that because they would have probably removed the ball in his knee if he was languishing in a bed, dying slowly.  Especially considering the ball wasn't difficult to access, or in a place that would even require a surgical extractor. 
I would guess he died quickly enough that there was no point in attending to his wounds.  Probably not from the knee injury.
 
2013-06-27 12:20:46 PM

Whiskey Dickens: Anybody have any comments regarding the following:

"One doubt is due to the type of bullet.
"That's a combat round. It's almost like a shotgun but it also has a main bullet. So you wouldn't think unless somebody was cheating in the duel that they would have that kind of a load," Kelso says."

I'm not sure what the researcher is trying to describe here.  I've never heard of anything other than a lead ball being used in a muzzle loading pistol.  Cure me of my ignorance, Fark historians!


It was commonly called "Buck and Ball" and was an effective load for smooth bore weapons.
Here are some photos of the load:

upload.wikimedia.org

1.bp.blogspot.com

Interestingly enough, this load is available for modern smooth bore weapons (shotguns):
www.muellersatomics.com


/In before DittyBopper
 
2013-06-27 12:52:19 PM
Thinks he's related?

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
 
2013-06-27 01:06:56 PM

id10ts: If this was a duel, both parties were willing participants.
That would mean this wasn't a "legitimate murder".


came here to say this, dueling was an honorable way of killing someone and not murder at all depending on the time frame.
 
2013-06-27 02:24:27 PM

Whiskey Dickens: groppet: That must have sucked to die like that. Infection from the wound seems to be slow and painful.

I'm not sure this guy was alive for the days required to die of infection.  I say that because they would have probably removed the ball in his knee if he was languishing in a bed, dying slowly.  Especially considering the ball wasn't difficult to access, or in a place that would even require a surgical extractor. 
I would guess he died quickly enough that there was no point in attending to his wounds.  Probably not from the knee injury.


Yeah probably nicked an artery or something and he bled out. Infection is still possible though. Any break in the skin was potentially a death sentence then. No antibiotics so yeah.
 
2013-06-27 02:30:40 PM
RTFA all the way to the end, guys.  They don't say it's murder because to was a duel.  They say it's murder because buck and ball was used, therefore they assume it's cheating.  Cheating in a duel could be considered murder.

They did not, however, establish that the buck and ball was surreptitiously used.  They made an assumption.
 
2013-06-27 06:58:32 PM

theotherles: Pardon Me Sultan: John, Paul and Ringo wanted for questioning

What about George?


Do you know how I know you didn't read the article? Or perhaps you merely skimmed over a central point of the article?
 
2013-06-27 07:12:54 PM

Merry Sunshine: RTFA all the way to the end, guys.  They don't say it's murder because to was a duel.  They say it's murder because buck and ball was used, therefore they assume it's cheating.  Cheating in a duel could be considered murder.

They did not, however, establish that the buck and ball was surreptitiously used.  They made an assumption.


I also wonder if the ball wasn't removed because they assumed the buck was the only ammunition that was needed to be removed.  Without x-rays, the doc would not have known the ball was there, or was just not capable of removing the ball from bone.
 
2013-06-27 07:52:58 PM

Pardon Me Sultan: theotherles: Pardon Me Sultan: John, Paul and Ringo wanted for questioning

What about George?

Do you know how I know you didn't read the article? Or perhaps you merely skimmed over a central point of the article?


(Bangs head on the wall.)
 
2013-06-28 11:33:59 AM
Shot through the lower leg?

media.tumblr.com
 
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