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(Slate)   The majority of American's don't know how to use a knife and fork, have table manners that make a drunk chimpanzee look civilized   (slate.com) divider line 276
    More: Obvious, Americans, Emily Post, position of trust, Williams College, common courtesy, tables  
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9700 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jun 2013 at 1:27 AM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-27 12:07:40 AM
oh look. it's this topic...again...

In Europe the use the fork exclusively in their left hand. In america we tend to switch hands after cutting. in Asia they use chopsticks instead of forks. in parts of Africa and the middle east they eat with their hands. people do different things in different parts of the world. If you get upset over how people use their utensils to feed themselves, you have way too much time to worry over pointless shiat and you need a hobby.
 
2013-06-27 12:13:13 AM
We'll write an article about how happy we were to get a compliment, that, if any of our American friends had paid to a foreigner in similar circumstances would have resulted in an article about awful and presumptuous we are.  Thanks DOMA.
 
2013-06-27 12:24:59 AM
i1079.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-27 12:36:22 AM
And don't even get me started on their misuse of apostrophe's.
 
2013-06-27 12:40:05 AM
Well played Philoe.

2 points. Don't understand why anyone gives a fark and I don't understand why Americans don't just keep the damn fork in their left hand, either. I have always done it that way, but I'm ambidextrous. Don't understand juggling your utensils.
 
2013-06-27 12:41:19 AM

Confabulat: And don't even get me started on their theyre misuse of apostrophe's.


Dubmass.
 
2013-06-27 12:57:23 AM
Eat with your fingers.  That will show them.
 
2013-06-27 12:57:25 AM
From the honourable authour of other great works, such as;

 'Using the proper colour metre stick'
and
'Wearing your pyjamas in the bathe'

/what, our cultures aren't identical? You don't say...
 
2013-06-27 01:11:54 AM

log_jammin: in Asia they use chopsticks instead of forks.


And it's mostly for shoveling food into your face, not so much for picking things up.
 
2013-06-27 01:29:19 AM
And there grammer aren't so goods niether.
 
2013-06-27 01:31:54 AM
I've been complimented for the same thing, I cut with my right hand and keep the fork in my left.  But I do it because I'm left handed, so eating that way is natural.

I was raised, though, with the rule that eating with your weak hand, while holding your knife in your strong hand, was uncivilized.  The idea was much like that presented in the article, that you were being polite by not brandishing your knife.  It's very similar to the reason you shake hands or salute with your right.

I was quite surprised when complimented on it, I had been admonished regularly as a child for not swapping.  The (usually elderly) person attempting to "correct" me would often be ameliorated once I explained my left handedness, but not always even then.
 
2013-06-27 01:32:01 AM
I only use spoons.  Soundgarden made me infamous in song.
 
2013-06-27 01:32:40 AM
Look, I know what a fork is for.

But howcome there's gotta be three of them?
 
2013-06-27 01:33:36 AM
The cut-and-switch method is the proper American method. It evolved to be a more elegant method than the European left-hand fist grip style.

When in Rome, and all that.
 
2013-06-27 01:34:03 AM
newzealandbakerdreamer.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-06-27 01:36:10 AM
cdn-static.cnet.co.uk

Confabulat: And don't even get me started on their misuse of apostrophe's.


api.ning.com
 
2013-06-27 01:36:11 AM
Oh, well excuse us primitive 'Merkinz for the way we handle the cutlery, Nigel Van Buttbutt. We didn't know our lives were subject to your approval.
 
2013-06-27 01:37:21 AM

Bonanza Jellybean: And there grammer aren't so goods

well niether.

FTFY

/Perfectly cromulent American
//Left hand holds the fork
///the devil hand!
 
2013-06-27 01:37:35 AM
The proper response would have been "you give even half a shiat about how 'elegant' my fork-holding method is? You must be an exceedingly miserable person."
 
2013-06-27 01:39:11 AM
I'm American. I never switch hands. Doesn't even occur to me to do it. Too inefficient. Don't care what anyone else thinks.
 
2013-06-27 01:42:04 AM
Interesting. I don't think I've seen anyone in my family switch hands, and I'm the sole lefty in the family.

Fiancé has a story of a WWII (?) P.O.W. that was shot on the spot in a restaurant because he switched, immediately identifying himself as an American.

/when in Rome
//a concept Americans seem to always have had trouble with
 
2013-06-27 01:42:29 AM

vwarb: The proper response would have been "you give even half a shiat about how 'elegant' my fork-holding method is? You must be an exceedingly miserable person."


This. If you judge people solely by how they hold utensils, you're a horrible person who nobody should be forced to endure. Table manners should focus on more relevant things, like not farting or making a mess at the table (though ripping a loud one on a communal bench is a great way to tickle everyone at the table).
 
2013-06-27 01:42:40 AM
I'm dainty, so I use shrimp forks and scissors to eat my steak.
 
2013-06-27 01:42:53 AM
I guess I'm gonna start holding my fork like this

farm3.static.flickr.com

Except with the left hand.
 
2013-06-27 01:44:37 AM

Ow! That was my feelings!: Well played Philoe.

2 points. Don't understand why anyone gives a fark and I don't understand why Americans don't just keep the damn fork in their left hand, either. I have always done it that way, but I'm ambidextrous. Don't understand juggling your utensils.


I'm right-handed. I can't throw or write worth shiat with my left hand yet I have absolutely no problem using a fork with it. I also use a mouse with my left hand, but that's mainly a result of years of ten-key data entry.
 
2013-06-27 01:44:45 AM

Peki: Interesting. I don't think I've seen anyone in my family switch hands, and I'm the sole lefty in the family.

Fiancé has a story of a WWII (?) P.O.W. that was shot on the spot in a restaurant because he switched, immediately identifying himself as an American.

/when in Rome
//a concept Americans seem to always have had trouble with


thenewinquiry.com
 
2013-06-27 01:46:59 AM
When I was around nine years old, my parents dragged me to a family friend's wedding in Ohio. The meal was chicken cordon bleu which was fine since mom was in a 'gourmet' club so I was used to eating fancy food sometimes, but she just about smacked me in front of other guests because I cut up my whole piece of chicken instead of cutting a bite, eating it, repeating.

Never forgot that, because for fark's sake, I WAS NINE.

/parents born in '43
//so, so many old fashioned manners at home >.<...
 
2013-06-27 01:48:38 AM
I use two sporks with sharpened edges, alternately cutting and shoveling. When I get in the groove it's like a conveyor belt.
 
2013-06-27 01:49:22 AM
I keep the fork in my dominant hand and cut with the other. It's not hard.
 
2013-06-27 01:50:55 AM
GuidoDelConfuso: I'm American. I never switch hands. Doesn't even occur to me to do it. Too inefficient. Don't care what anyone else thinks.

I'm sort of ambidextrous, but my right hand is dominant due to practice/continued use.

I can't write well with the left ... but I could easily do so if I practiced.

I can mouse with my left hand well enough for general computing tasks (about 70% efficiency), but can not game using the mouse in the left hand whatsoever.

When I eat the proverbial cake and ice cream, I can use either hand (hell for kicks, I sometimes use both, a spoon in one and a fork in the other).

I prefer drinking using the left hand, but my right hand has better knife skills so I do all of my stabbings with the right hand.

I use remote controls with either the left or right.

When I push the clicky thing to open the car door, it's always the left hand. But when I use a key to open the front door of my condo, it's always the right (the hinges are on the left, I once had an office where the door hinges were on the right and that farked me all up, using my right hand to put in the key backward).

Most of the time, it basically comes down to whichever hand is closer ... unless strength is a factor (in which case, I use the right).
 
2013-06-27 01:51:02 AM

ladyfortuna: When I was around nine years old, my parents dragged me to a family friend's wedding in Ohio. The meal was chicken cordon bleu which was fine since mom was in a 'gourmet' club so I was used to eating fancy food sometimes, but she just about smacked me in front of other guests because I cut up my whole piece of chicken instead of cutting a bite, eating it, repeating.

Never forgot that, because for fark's sake, I WAS NINE.

/parents born in '43
//so, so many old fashioned manners at home >.<...


Are you from Fortuna? Cause that's where I'm from,,My parents are from (b 1940)... And all I know is NO ELBOWS ON THE TABLE!!!
 
2013-06-27 01:51:41 AM

Confabulat: And don't even get me started on their misuse of apostrophe's.


Thi's.
 
2013-06-27 01:52:28 AM
Forks should have serrated edges for cutting anyway.
 
2013-06-27 01:52:44 AM

timujin: I've been complimented for the same thing, I cut with my right hand and keep the fork in my left.  But I do it because I'm left handed, so eating that way is natural.

I was raised, though, with the rule that eating with your weak hand, while holding your knife in your strong hand, was uncivilized.  The idea was much like that presented in the article, that you were being polite by not brandishing your knife.  It's very similar to the reason you shake hands or salute with your right.

I was quite surprised when complimented on it, I had been admonished regularly as a child for not swapping.  The (usually elderly) person attempting to "correct" me would often be ameliorated once I explained my left handedness, but not always even then.


I'm cross-handed, which means I do some things strictly left and some strictly right.

I use a fork and knife left-handed. I suppose that should mean that, as an American, I should do it all backwards -- hold the fork in my right, the knife in my left, cut, switch the fork to my left. But I don't, nor could I if I wanted to. Why don't we leftie-diners do the entire process backwards? Thank goodness we're smarter than that, because the whole "cut and switch" thing is retarded, but I've always wondered. Putting it differently, if I, as a leftie, can't use the fork with my right hand, then why is it possible for right-handers to use the fork with their left, before switching? It should be consistent.

Nobody ever tried to switch me, by the way, and I was born in 1961, so my childhood was awhile ago.
 
2013-06-27 01:53:13 AM
Who the fark cares? Have people gotten so pathetic that this is an issue to some? What next, what cheek you raise off the chair when you fart?
 
2013-06-27 01:53:27 AM
I'm left-handed (somewhat ambidextrous) and I've never been a switcher.

I always figured that the reason most people (Americans I guess) shuffle their fork around is that their left hand is just too clumsy or weak to handle a knife or navigating a fork to their mouth so they use their right for all the work and relegate their left to holding things still.
 
2013-06-27 01:53:58 AM
Table manners are a way to show upbringing and respect for others. Knowing etiquette can help you ever dine with people who have power or connections.

But then, if you hang out with people who go to Sizzler for a special occasion, being able to use a fork without hurting yourself is an accomplishment.
 
2013-06-27 01:54:03 AM
People are trained to zig zag. It's the 'correct' way to handle your utensils. If someone from another country or culture gives you a hard time about it, stick them with your fork. That is known as repaying politeness in kind.
 
2013-06-27 01:55:06 AM

bwilson27: ladyfortuna: When I was around nine years old, my parents dragged me to a family friend's wedding in Ohio. The meal was chicken cordon bleu which was fine since mom was in a 'gourmet' club so I was used to eating fancy food sometimes, but she just about smacked me in front of other guests because I cut up my whole piece of chicken instead of cutting a bite, eating it, repeating.

Never forgot that, because for fark's sake, I WAS NINE.

/parents born in '43
//so, so many old fashioned manners at home >.<...

Are you from Fortuna? Cause that's where I'm from,,My parents are from (b 1940)... And all I know is NO ELBOWS ON THE TABLE!!!


No, sorry to disappoint, it's an unrelated joke about my absolute shiatty luck :)
 
2013-06-27 01:55:12 AM
fusillade762: I'm right-handed. I can't throw or write worth shiat with my left hand yet I have absolutely no problem using a fork with it. I also use a mouse with my left hand, but that's mainly a result of years of ten-key data entry.

When doing lots of ten-key entry, I would switch between left mouse/right key, but if my hands got tired, I would reverse it (and push the keyboard as far to the left edge of the desk as it could go without falling off).

I also never got the hand of WASD, so always mapped the numberpad. This became especially important in quake/quake2/quake3 because of mods (needed to bind a shiatload of buttons).
 
2013-06-27 01:55:59 AM
Fork stays in my left because I like to stab and throw a knife with my right.
 
2013-06-27 01:56:09 AM

jtown: Peki: Interesting. I don't think I've seen anyone in my family switch hands, and I'm the sole lefty in the family.

Fiancé has a story of a WWII (?) P.O.W. that was shot on the spot in a restaurant because he switched, immediately identifying himself as an American.

/when in Rome
//a concept Americans seem to always have had trouble with

[thenewinquiry.com image 600x400]


Sometimes there's a right answer...  Just saying, some customs are more efficient.
 
2013-06-27 01:56:57 AM

timujin: I've been complimented for the same thing, I cut with my right hand and keep the fork in my left.  But I do it because I'm left handed, so eating that way is natural.

I was raised, though, with the rule that eating with your weak hand, while holding your knife in your strong hand, was uncivilized.  The idea was much like that presented in the article, that you were being polite by not brandishing your knife.  It's very similar to the reason you shake hands or salute with your right.

I was quite surprised when complimented on it, I had been admonished regularly as a child for not swapping.  The (usually elderly) person attempting to "correct" me would often be ameliorated once I explained my left handedness, but not always even then.


Where were you raised? Westeros? Where I was raised, being stabbed by a dinner guest is not a big risk we typically encounter.
 
2013-06-27 01:57:12 AM
Approves:

i13.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-27 02:00:41 AM
The nuns at my school patrolled the cafeteria to make sure we ate "properly". Cut-and-switch was unacceptable. This was Montreal in the 1980s.
 
2013-06-27 02:02:12 AM

BraveNewCheneyWorld: a right answer...


that was interesting
 
2013-06-27 02:09:34 AM
www.ghostofthefuture.com
 
2013-06-27 02:13:42 AM
i.qkme.me
 
2013-06-27 02:16:43 AM

Omahawg: [www.ghostofthefuture.com image 828x464]


I'll take blue shirt for a Benjamin.
 
2013-06-27 02:16:43 AM

Doc Daneeka: [i.qkme.me image 625x455]


img683.imageshack.us
 
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