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(BBC)   Mapping children's chances in life. If you live in the US, you need to give your congressman a kick in the ass   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 20
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2059 clicks; posted to Politics » on 26 Jun 2013 at 10:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-26 10:37:41 AM
Paid leave is available for mothers and fathers of infants in California.
 
2013-06-26 10:43:30 AM

mgshamster: Paid leave is available for mothers and fathers of infants in California.


The maps were done at a country level, because otherwise you would have to iteratively go down to the laws of every state, region, country, city, etc., which would probably take years to collate.
 
2013-06-26 10:45:16 AM
Came here to say that the maps were a bunch of BS as far as the United States is concerned, but was beaten to it.  As noted, different states have different standards.
 
2013-06-26 10:45:29 AM
That map implies Japan's shrinking population isn't due in large part to the extreme sexism in the workplace that forces mothers out.
 
2013-06-26 10:50:50 AM

rich_mitch: Came here to say that the maps were a bunch of BS as far as the United States is concerned, but was beaten to it.  As noted, different states have different standards.


Doesn't make it right. Side stepping the issue is condoning it IMHO. At very minimum there should be a guaranteed paid maternity leave here is the US.
 
2013-06-26 10:52:58 AM
Apparently there is no law preventing us from smoking in schools here in the US. Sweet. First day back in August I am going to light one up in front of my students...you know....cuz the map said it was okay.
 
2013-06-26 10:56:34 AM
On the question "Is smoking banned in schools," it said "no" for the United States. Do we really allow smoking in schools? Surely it is banned at the state and local level in most places, even if the federal government doesn't ban it at the national level.

And on the question of "Do Constitutions guarantee the right to educate for children with disabilities," it says "no" for the U.S. and 'yes" for the U.K. -- despite the fact that the UK has parliamentary sovereignity, where the (uncodified, unwritten) constitution can be changed by a simple act of parliament. Not all constitutions are equally firm bulwarks against the whims of change.*

So I am rather suspicious about the accuracy of this map.

*This is a pun, not a typo.
 
2013-06-26 10:57:20 AM

Into the blue again: rich_mitch: Came here to say that the maps were a bunch of BS as far as the United States is concerned, but was beaten to it.  As noted, different states have different standards.

Doesn't make it right. Side stepping the issue is condoning it IMHO. At very minimum there should be a guaranteed paid maternity leave here is the US.


To heck with that, we need guaranteed paid paternaty leave more.
 
2013-06-26 11:00:25 AM

Saiga410: Into the blue again: rich_mitch: Came here to say that the maps were a bunch of BS as far as the United States is concerned, but was beaten to it.  As noted, different states have different standards.

Doesn't make it right. Side stepping the issue is condoning it IMHO. At very minimum there should be a guaranteed paid maternity leave here is the US.

To heck with that, we need guaranteed paid paternaty leave more.


LOL, on a selfish level I agree with you. But we gotta start somewhere! First we get it for the woman, then we can claim discrimination!
 
2013-06-26 11:08:55 AM
What about a map of countries that produce over-simplified world maps containing arbitrary criteria?
 
2013-06-26 11:25:16 AM
Came for 'Muh America', leaving satisfied.
 
2013-06-26 11:33:56 AM
Uh....ya.  Why the hell does the constitution have to have the right for children with disabilities?  Does it even say in the constitution norms have the right to an education?

The education one also seems pretty BSy as the bachelors degree for teaching you know...has teaching classes.  I know my wife needed a degree in education and if I wanted to get into teaching physics I would need to take multiple classes or have a masters.

For the smoking, wtf is subnational level?  So ontario having a smoking ban (not sure which) means Canada gets a yellow while pretty much every state in the US bans smoking in school and it gets a red?  Fark off map guy.

The discrimination based on race we fail because its not in the constitution?  jesus christ.  Tell that to Paula Deen.

This seems entirely focused way to much on the consitution and what it says, rather than looking even at the federal level to see that half this shiat the US does.
 
2013-06-26 11:47:31 AM
US drinking age at 21 is very unique. Couldn't be driving safety, since Europe has much more strict DWI laws and enforcement.

Must have something to do with the KKK being a primary sponsor of prohibition -- not to many other countries had the KKK.
 
2013-06-26 01:10:55 PM
Wait.  Even motherf*#%ing IRAN allows mothers to have paid maternity leave!??

media.tumblr.com
 
2013-06-26 01:27:02 PM

xria: mgshamster: Paid leave is available for mothers and fathers of infants in California.

The maps were done at a country level, because otherwise you would have to iteratively go down to the laws of every state, region, country, city, etc., which would probably take years to collate.


Yeah, I know.  I just wanted to point out that here in California, both my wife and I can take time off when our son is born (in two months).

It's only 6 weeks, and it for partial pay only, but I believe California is the only state in the US that allows for time off.

/Still, thanks for pointing it out
 
2013-06-26 02:24:27 PM
Some of these maps are problematic:

The "how many hours are 14 year old protected from working on a school day?" map is kinda surprising. Australia doesn't have protections for that? Really?

Also, the map implies that working 0 hours is better than working 2 hours, which I may or may not agree with. There's something to be said for giving a teenager a safe after-school job. It teaches responsibility and gives them a bit of spending money. I think limits of total number of hours per week (say, no more than four hours per week, two hours per day or something) make more sense.

The alcohol thing is also kinda silly. The age at which you can purchase alcohol should, IMHO, be no higher than the minimum voting age or military service age, whichever is lower. If you can vote for your leaders and die for your country, you should be able to have a beer.

The "does the constitution ban discrimination based on ethnicity thing?" is silly too. Many countries don't have specific Constitutional guarantees spelled out, but common law or legislation with the force of constitutional law is in effect. I think it's especially silly that they list the UK, with its unwritten constitution, as having an explicit Constitutional guarantee.
 
2013-06-26 07:24:40 PM

xria: mgshamster: Paid leave is available for mothers and fathers of infants in California.
The maps were done at a country level, because otherwise you would have to iteratively go down to the laws of every state, region, country, city, etc., which would probably take years to collate.


So, you're saying that in order for the maps to be correct the people making them would have to do a lot more work.

I can't argue.

/I'm a geographer by training
//making maps with that level of detail is exactly what geographers do.
 
2013-06-26 09:05:03 PM
Some of this is totally bunk.

Japan has a legal age for purchasing alcohol, it's 20.  In nearly every public school system in the US, a teaching certificate is required along with a bachelor's degree.  Smoking is banned in schools in Japan.
 
2013-06-27 12:39:04 AM

At my high school the English Teacher's Staff Room was full of smoke*. Smoking may be banned at schools for the pupils but it is not as likely to be banned for the teachers and other adult staff.

The map on smoking bans has three levels 1) national bans; 2) sub-national (state or provincial bans) and 3) not banned. But. of course, not banned doesn't mean that school boards or schools don't ban it or banish it to smoking areas inside or outside of the school. Looking at the Wikipedia article on smoking in Canada, it is hard to say if smoking is banned or not in schools. Alberta forbids the sale of tobacco in schools and Quebec has banned not only smoking in public indoor spaces and workplaces but has gone further and banned ventilated smoking rooms, so you presumably can not smoke in schools at all, or close to the doors.

If "workplaces" include schools, smoking is banned in most provinces from various dates but might be allowed in ventilated smoking rooms in most provinces and thus schools.

The situation seems to be even more complex in the USA. Due to the influence of the Tobacco Lobby, tobacco growers and sundry merchantile interests (such as casinos, tabaconnists, clubs, etc.), the network of bans, partial bans and so forth would be difficult to map. Many states don't seem to have bans at all.

upload.wikimedia.org

upload.wikimedia.org
The map key is a Venn diagram!



*And the occasional Irish coffee.
 
2013-06-27 12:57:16 AM
We seem to be doing fairly well in Canada, but for some reason are behind the curve on breast-feeding.

No breasts please! We're Canadian. (The UK is also behind on this.)

Personally I don't think it is a problem if you use the old-fashioned shawl in the way God intended, to give breast-feeding babies some privacy. We just don't want to see nipples.

Perhaps I should write a letter to my MP and the PM:  STOP THE BAN ON NATURAL NIPPLES. Rubber nipples suck.

I can see room for improvement on a lot of issues.

Perhaps one of the reasons that the US is slower to introduce parental leave (apart from bootstrapy and anti-tax nutters) is that the US still has positive population growth. Many of the countries which offer parental leave have very low birth rates or want even higher birth rates for political reasons.

While some parental leave is a good idea, I know one co-worker who has had four children on the government dime. She was out of the office more than she was in and at half-pay that adds up. She was very bright and hard-working (albeit more conservative than is usual at our employer) but this seems a bit like gaming the system, which since she was part of a professional two-income family was not really all that necessary. She could have done with a lot less leave. So much for the bad feeling between working moms and stay-at-home moms. At half pay for both parents for several months per child, you can be both and have it all!

Milking the generous benefits system of government unionized employees is not just for liberals, apparently. Conservatives will take every cent they can get in government subsidies.

As Canadian Business Magazine once proclaimed on its cover: Government subsidies. If you don't take them, your competitors will! As a liberal  I wouldn't mind seeing a lot of conservatives and well-to-do business people shooed away from the trough so that the needy people can get some swill.

Am I being Obama-ish and steering money towards my "poor people"? So be it. A lot of them work damn hard all their lives for crap pay and squat benefits. Feed my sheep! as Jesus H. Christ put it. I may need some of that swill myself to survive in my old age and poverty.

Anecdotal evidence is weak, but I know there are plenty of conservative school teachers, university professors and public service workers. I had to listen to them rant for thirty years or more.
 
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