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(Wired)   The NSA has become the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever   (wired.com) divider line 58
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2309 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Jun 2013 at 11:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-26 08:37:24 AM
The NSA has become the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever

...in the history of the United States.

FTFY.

And if you are just learning this now, you haven't been paying attention.
 
2013-06-26 09:23:10 AM
The Stasi still has them beat.
 
2013-06-26 09:56:36 AM

Aarontology: The Stasi still has them beat.


What does it say about the NSA when you have to compare them to communist East Germany for sheer scale purposes?
 
2013-06-26 10:24:47 AM
Potentially?

/Don't encourage them
 
2013-06-26 10:50:36 AM

Marcus Aurelius: Aarontology: The Stasi still has them beat.

What does it say about the NSA when you have to compare them to communist East Germany for sheer scale purposes?


Socialist East Germany. The Stasi never had this broad of a tool.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-06-26 10:51:05 AM
Does the CIA overthrowing foreign democracies and replacing them with pro-US dictatorships in places like Chile and Iran and Guatemala count as intrusive?
 
2013-06-26 10:56:21 AM

Marcus Aurelius: Aarontology: The Stasi still has them beat.

What does it say about the NSA when you have to compare them to communist East Germany for sheer scale purposes?


And that's just for the stuff we know about.
 
2013-06-26 11:07:03 AM
Has become? Someone hasn't been reading their James Bramford. Operation Shamrock anyone?

/seriously, go read The Puzzle Palace
 
2013-06-26 11:15:32 AM
The author seems overly fascinated by Utah's polygamist history.
 
2013-06-26 11:20:33 AM

Three Crooked Squirrels: The author seems overly fascinated by Utah's polygamist history.


The NSA knows all about it thanks to Verizon's family and family and family plan.
 
2013-06-26 11:24:19 AM

dittybopper: The NSA has become the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever

...in the history of the United States.

FTFY.

And if you are just learning this now, you haven't been paying attention.


particularly since TFA is over a year old...
 
2013-06-26 11:30:40 AM
A known organization with a known purpose being the most covert...  Somewhere, there's a disconnect in understanding.
 
2013-06-26 11:31:49 AM
This surprises you? Their nickname is No Such Agency.
 
2013-06-26 11:32:44 AM

vpb: Does the CIA overthrowing foreign democracies and replacing them with pro-US dictatorships in places like Chile and Iran and Guatemala count as intrusive?


No, see -- that's cool because it keeps us out of wars.

/have actually heard libertarians make this argument
//"no nation building! i mean, like, not in public!"
 
2013-06-26 11:33:35 AM
Old news is old news. Thread going read in 3...2...1...
 
2013-06-26 11:47:15 AM
i149.photobucket.com
/on vacation
 
2013-06-26 11:52:43 AM
i would like to know if they've had any successes?  they knew enough info to be on guard for 9/11 and didn't share info with fbi.  and since then, they've had even more access to info, and i've heard even less of them.

at least the fbi and cia do something with all their ill-gotten info.  it's like the nsa is just curious.  an agency of ineffectual peeping toms.  cut the funding, let the fbi and cia do the job.  at least they have accountability to some one.  kind of.

/ enjoy reading my lame ass-emails, nsa dude
 
2013-06-26 12:01:00 PM
Is this greenlight a joke?  The article's from March of 2012.
 
2013-06-26 12:04:09 PM

pute kisses like a man: i would like to know if they've had any successes?  they knew enough info to be on guard for 9/11 and didn't share info with fbi.  and since then, they've had even more access to info, and i've heard even less of them.

at least the fbi and cia do something with all their ill-gotten info.  it's like the nsa is just curious.  an agency of ineffectual peeping toms.  cut the funding, let the fbi and cia do the job.  at least they have accountability to some one.  kind of.

/ enjoy reading my lame ass-emails, nsa dude


The job of the NSA is to listen.  That's why it seems like an agency of 'ineffectual peeping toms'.  It doesn't like to distribute data outside of the agency because it can no longer exercise control over it, and that increases the risk that it will be leaked.

So, for example, they might send the FBI a summary of what they think is important, but it may or may not be what the FBI wants or needs.  They won't send the raw intercepts, though.

Prior to 9/11, though, there was a major wall between the NSA and the FBI that actually prevented them from talking back and forth in any substantive way, which is why some of the data that the NSA had on the hijackers didn't get back to the FBI.  That was because of the revelations in the 1970's of domestic spying, and the subsequent passage of FISA.

Since 9/11, the government has been trying to find ways to side-step FISA without actually out-and-out ignoring it.  Don't blame the NSA, though:  They are just doing what they are being told to do.  Blame the executive and legislative branches, because they are the ones who are telling them what to do (mainly, the executive).
 
2013-06-26 12:04:35 PM

thomps: dittybopper: The NSA has become the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever

...in the history of the United States.

FTFY.

And if you are just learning this now, you haven't been paying attention.

particularly since TFA is over a year old...


There is a better article in this month's edition:

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/06/general-keith-alexander-cyb er war/

Also read Richard A. Clarke's "Cyberwar" to understand how screwed up the thinking is at that level.   Clarke actually calls out things that happened in "Live Free or Die Hard" as an example of what hacker's can do.
 
2013-06-26 12:05:07 PM
The NSA has become the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever

... and has been so since it was founded during the Cold War.

Let's stop saying "on a clear day the sky is blue" and start discussing what to do about it alfarkingready.
 
2013-06-26 12:31:33 PM
Apparently this reached Threat Level Midnight over a year ago and no one listened.
 
2013-06-26 12:34:46 PM
Obvious tag in hiding?

/nsa knows where it's at
 
Xai
2013-06-26 12:45:07 PM
Isn't it amazing how even fiscal conservatives fully support paying somewhere in the $15b region per year to spy on every american's personal life for basically no reason?
 
2013-06-26 12:46:25 PM
usahitman.com

Old news is good news...

/Hot, like a Bavarian Fire Drill.
 
2013-06-26 12:47:46 PM
i500.listal.com
 
2013-06-26 12:56:41 PM
Anyone thinking fondly of the old days of the no-intelligence administration?

t3.gstatic.com
 
2013-06-26 01:01:14 PM
The NSA has become the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever...

that you know about, subby.
 
2013-06-26 01:05:59 PM

royone: Anyone thinking fondly of the old days of the no-intelligence administration?

[t3.gstatic.com image 259x195]


I seriously doubt the NSA (or CIA for that matter) is beholden to any administration and it's been like that since at least the 80's.  These organizations sliced off a chunk of governmental power and have been running semi-autonomously for decades.  The only real surprise to me is that it's coming as such a shock to so many people now...
 
2013-06-26 01:08:49 PM

bdub77: Old news is old news. Thread going read in 3...2...1...


well i read it, does that count?
 
2013-06-26 01:23:15 PM

0100010: royone: Anyone thinking fondly of the old days of the no-intelligence administration?

[t3.gstatic.com image 259x195]

I seriously ...


I think I see the problem.
 
2013-06-26 01:32:58 PM
Was going to point out that various european and soviet internal agencies have been by far more intrusive. But I see that's been covered. Yeah reading my email routing headers is horrific and all (oh noes!), but let's not let the rhetoric get too many light years divergent from reality.
 
2013-06-26 01:43:34 PM

vpb: Does the CIA overthrowing foreign democracies and replacing them with pro-US dictatorships in places like Chile and Iran and Guatemala count as intrusive?


Not as intrusive as the NSA storing my tweets in a server room.
 
2013-06-26 02:05:38 PM
No?  Seriously?

I am shocked.  Shocked, I say.  This is brand new information.
 
2013-06-26 02:08:12 PM
cache.ohinternet.com

global3.memecdn.com
 
2013-06-26 02:38:03 PM
NSA listens. NRO watches. NRO is probably feeling pretty smug right about now, since they're watching me type this from orbit. :-)

Read Bamford's books. NSA no doubt can't stand him, but he has consistently written about them for 20 years plus.
 
2013-06-26 03:01:14 PM
dear NSA. please hire me to work at Bluffdale. I'm fully qualified, strong statistics and IT background, and it's less than two hours from here. you already know where to find me.
 
2013-06-26 03:26:51 PM

utah dude: dear NSA. please hire me to work at Bluffdale. I'm fully qualified, strong statistics and IT background, and it's less than two hours from here. you already know where to find me.


You should just just email yourself your resume?
 
2013-06-26 03:47:57 PM

OrbitalFerret: NSA listens. NRO watches. NRO is probably feeling pretty smug right about now, since they're watching me type this from orbit. :-)

Read Bamford's books. NSA no doubt can't stand him, but he has consistently written about them for 20 years plus.


I read "The Puzzle Palace" for the first time when I was part of that infrastructure.
 
2013-06-26 04:41:27 PM
The NSA is trying to top the list of most hated three letter agency. Watch out IRS and TSA!
 
2013-06-26 04:54:20 PM

Elegy: Has become?


Came to say this.
 
2013-06-26 05:04:27 PM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-06-26 05:50:03 PM
But since Obama is running it I know you farkers are allright with it.
 
2013-06-26 08:30:01 PM

dittybopper: OrbitalFerret: NSA listens. NRO watches. NRO is probably feeling pretty smug right about now, since they're watching me type this from orbit. :-)

Read Bamford's books. NSA no doubt can't stand him, but he has consistently written about them for 20 years plus.

I read "The Puzzle Palace" for the first time when I was part of that infrastructure.


Were you a table?

There are just some books that you shouldn't read in certain situations.   Being given Catch-22 as a graduation gift for the Air Force Academy was funny, and cruel.
 
2013-06-26 08:43:41 PM

Aarontology: Three Crooked Squirrels: The author seems overly fascinated by Utah's polygamist history.

The NSA knows all about it thanks to Verizon's family and family and family plan.


Now the author can be fascinated by Utah's voyeurist future.
 
2013-06-26 08:57:05 PM
And you all thought I just used Tor for the sexy images.
 
2013-06-26 09:30:15 PM

Elegy: Has become? Someone hasn't been reading their James Bramford. Operation Shamrock anyone?

/seriously, go read The Puzzle Palace


The cheesy action books I read back in the 80s were always talking about how the NSA was bigger than the FBI and CIA combined, but no one knew about them.
 
2013-06-26 09:37:40 PM
DIA/SOCOM runs them a close second in data mining, though.
 
2013-06-26 09:53:14 PM
Reminds me of this book I read back in the 90s ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Fortress

Synopsis
When the United States National Security Agency's code-breaking supercomputer (TRANSLTR) encounters a new and complex code-Digital Fortress-that it cannot break, Commander Trevor Strathmore calls in Susan Fletcher, their head cryptographer, to crack it. She discovers that it was written by Ensei Tankado, a former NSA employee who became displeased with the NSA's intrusion into people's private lives. Tankado intends to auction the code's algorithm on his website and have his partner, "NDAKOTA", release it for free if he dies. Essentially holding the NSA hostage, the agency is determined to stop Digital Fortress from becoming a threat to national security.
 
2013-06-26 10:18:31 PM

dittybopper: And if you are just learning this now, you haven't been paying attention.


An awful lot of willful ignorance out there.
 
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