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(KING 5 News)   Representative Liz Pike (R-eally? WA) Plays the 'Blame All Teachers' Card   (king5.com) divider line 125
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2425 clicks; posted to Politics » on 25 Jun 2013 at 8:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-25 08:37:08 AM
Remember kiddies: Anyone who takes a public salary is a leech.

/Most of all state representatives.
 
2013-06-25 08:40:14 AM
I don't care what the profession or what the circumstances- cutting out merit raises or built in COLAs coupled with the actual increase in cost of living is nothing more than the business saying to the employee that he is worth less to them this year than he was last year.

Mocking people when you've just made that statement is pretty tasteless.
 
2013-06-25 08:40:15 AM
A life in the day of a WA State Representative...

Then

Instead, I chose to work a career in private sector business

LOL WAT

She's self loathing, but has managed to place that anger on to teachers for some bizarre reason. Republican's republic'n, I guess.

BTW, if you support the concept of corporation, you support unions.
 
2013-06-25 08:51:12 AM
The big difference between the U.S. public education system and others in the world is that we have unions that only care about the adults in the system.

The big difference is that in the countries that are beating us, teachers are held in high esteem.  They're paid well, schools are well-funded, and if a problem arises - the government fixes it instead of trying to shift money to private schools.  Not having school districts run by fundamentalist wackos who are more likely to try to ban Harry Potter and established science because they teach Satanism helps too.

For me, it's all about priorities and spending less money that the state takes in. If we do this, we will have a reserve for emergencies and economic downturns so that we can avoid raising yet more taxes.

And other countries probably don't have politicians who consider their children's education to not be a 'priority' or bad schools to not be an emergency worth of raising taxes.

I am a State Representative with core values in smaller, more efficient government, more personal responsibility and less reliance on government in our everyday lives who doesn't realize that she gets paid more than teachers, with better benefits, and gets more days off than they do.  And I don't have to deal with petulant, whiny children - I get to BE ONE.
 
2013-06-25 08:51:15 AM
Execute the biatch, and her constituants it's the only way.
 
2013-06-25 08:58:44 AM
My fiance is history and civics teacher in a public high school. I Wish she had all the time off that people think they get. She has been grading research papers for the last month addition to preparing her daily plans. and creating the final exams all on 4 hours of sleep a night.

She has this crazy idea that she has to be a good effective teacher, not just an easy one. She says that the kids appreciate it.
 
2013-06-25 09:09:55 AM
I'm always shocked that more people aren't taking advantage of the sweet, sweet high-paying, low work, no stress job that is teaching in these threads.

// From what I hear, you barely have to pass college, and from then on it's smooth sailing until you retire at 55 making 6 figures on a pension.
 
2013-06-25 09:10:14 AM
So, to be sure, this waste of oxygen will not be receiving a pension for her government job, yes? And I am sure that she is hard at work, 60-80 hours a week in the capital building, filibustering for fetuses or something.

Average starting wage for teachers in Washington State in 2012: $36,474. Average for all Teachers in Washington State: $52,926.

Oh, I am sure you feel you made the wrong decision, Pike. Oh, let's not forget that these teachers are often having to supply their own classrooms out of pocket.

When you factor in the hours spent after class working, I would wager they work more hours per year than the average worker, or congressman. Those summer months? Often spent working, making ends meet. When you figure out what they actually make an hour, it's embarrassing. These are college educated People, responsible for the education if the children in your state, and you show some goddamned respect. They at least deserve that, if not a consummate wage.

Get your priorities in order, stop your whining, and do your job.
 
2013-06-25 09:27:41 AM

KyngNothing: I'm always shocked that more people aren't taking advantage of the sweet, sweet high-paying, low work, no stress job that is teaching in these threads.

// From what I hear, you barely have to pass college, and from then on it's smooth sailing until you retire at 55 making 6 figures on a pension.


4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-25 09:29:35 AM
Critics have said the letter is condescending and ignores the work teachers do outside of classroom hours.

Those critics are right. Teachers stay late, they work at home, they never really leave that shiat behind during the school year, yet they don't get paid for the extra hours.

Others agreed with Pike that teachers have far more benefits than their peers in the private industry.

By "peers in the private industry", you must mean "teachers in private schools, since those are the only "peers" a teacher has in employment. Guess what? private school teachers get summers off as well, unless it is a year round school, and there are public schools with the same programs, so I would guess that once again, these people have no idea what they're farking talking about.
 
2013-06-25 09:31:14 AM
Republicans, as a party, seek to:
1. Ban abortion, ensuring a greater supply of poor children of single parents
2. Cut food stamps, S-CHIP, TANF, et cetera, ensuring a greater supply of hungry, poor children
3. De-fund public schools, ensuring a greater supply of ignorant, skill-less, poor children
4. Eliminate the EPA, ensuring a greater supply of mercury-laden, poor children

All of which lead to a larger burden on social services while reducing the quality or our labor force, ensuring an endless-loop cycle of poverty.

Jesus Christ, lady, teachers may not be heroes but let's not pretend that they're a bunch of do-nothing layabouts with no purpose and no effort in their lives.  Teaching is time-consuming and frustrating work.
 
2013-06-25 09:31:32 AM

Karac: The big difference between the U.S. public education system and others in the world is that we have unions that only care about the adults in the system.

The big difference is that in the countries that are beating us, teachers are held in high esteem.  They're paid well, schools are well-funded, and if a problem arises - the government fixes it instead of trying to shift money to private schools.  Not having school districts run by fundamentalist wackos who are more likely to try to ban Harry Potter and established science because they teach Satanism helps too.

For me, it's all about priorities and spending less money that the state takes in. If we do this, we will have a reserve for emergencies and economic downturns so that we can avoid raising yet more taxes.

And other countries probably don't have politicians who consider their children's education to not be a 'priority' or bad schools to not be an emergency worth of raising taxes.

I am a State Representative with core values in smaller, more efficient government, more personal responsibility and less reliance on government in our everyday lives who doesn't realize that she gets paid more than teachers, with better benefits, and gets more days off than they do.  And I don't have to deal with petulant, whiny children - I get to BE ONE.


The problem is that:

It is extremely difficult to get rid of bad teachers (due to the Unions).
Pensions are too generous, everyone else that is not in a Union (w/pension) has to save money to retire.
 
2013-06-25 09:33:35 AM

Mikey1969: By "peers in the private industry", you must mean "teachers in private schools, since those are the only "peers" a teacher has in employment.


Also, what do private schools do with poor-behaving kids?  Expulsion.  Special needs?  Exclusion.  Problems at all?  Expulsion.

PS teachers have to absorb all the problems from other educational venues.
 
2013-06-25 09:34:02 AM

deeyablo: Those summer months? Often spent working, making ends meet.


Yep, quite often bartending or waiting tables. Usually the only jobs they can find that will just let them show up and work the summer and then leave again when the summer ends. They don't take a 3 month vacation, living off the piles of gold they have been hoarding in their cave with their pet dragon, Smaug.
 
2013-06-25 09:34:06 AM
What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?

Why do we have teachers protesting that they don't get a 5% annual raise just because they exist?

I am sick of this stuff, these unions are getting out of control and we need more politicians to put them back in their place.

Chris Christie is doing this in New Jersey. A few years ago he gave the teachers unions a choice, freeze the salaries going into next year and the state would help you with your budget OR keep your raises and the districts have to make up the differences in other areas, like teacher cuts, student activities, and so forth. Out of the 600+ school districts in NJ less than 50 went with freezing teacher salaries. Even one district the superintendent took a 80K year pay cut to save two teachers, the only district out of 600 where an administrator took a pay cut.

This is sickening, as a tax payer you all should be appalled by the actions of these unions. The NJEA, the State wide teachers union in New Jersey, went as far as stating that any district that amended their contracts to freeze wages into the next school year will receive little or no support from the state wide union.

Let me illustrate what these districts were forced to do by the NJEA

Teacher A
Years of experience: 2
Salary $50,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Excellent

Teacher B
Years of experience: 20
Salary: $90,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Adequate

What some districts did to keep with the 5% raise was:

Make Teacher A 4/5ths of a full time teacher (20 percent pay cut)
New Salary $42,000 plus full benefits

Teacher B still full time, tenure, fogged the mirror the longest
New Salary: $94,500 plus full benefits

^^ That is what the NJEA supported, cut some teachers 20 percent while guaranteeing 5% raises to the mirror foggers

* Some districts laid off teacher A

Now both math classes will get larger, more students/teacher ratio, something the NJEA is publically against, but is all for it if they get to keep their raises.
 
2013-06-25 09:34:39 AM

ferretman: It is extremely difficult to get rid of bad teachers (due to the Unions).
Pensions are too generous, everyone else that is not in a Union (w/pension) has to save money to retire.


Bold statements and a good retort, once you justify it.  No blogs please.
 
2013-06-25 09:35:17 AM

deeyablo: So, to be sure, this waste of oxygen will not be receiving a pension for her government job, yes? And I am sure that she is hard at work, 60-80 hours a week in the capital building, filibustering for fetuses or something.

Average starting wage for teachers in Washington State in 2012: $36,474. Average for all Teachers in Washington State: $52,926.


For comparison, Washington state legislators such as this women work 70% of a full-time job.  Even if we don't count the fact that teachers work before and after regular school hours, they get three months 'off' (which usually includes taking continuing education or training classes instead of sipping fruity umbrella drinks on a beach) - which comes to 75% of a 52-week a year job

And compared to the average for all teachers of $52,926 at 75%, she's making $42,106 at 70%.  Not so far apart considering the teachers also have to deal with children and have the responsibility to be scapegoats for the willfully and deliberately ignorant.
 
2013-06-25 09:38:31 AM

dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?


How impoverished must they be for you to feel that they have sufficient pride? Howe much less do you demand they make for the privilege of serving you?
 
2013-06-25 09:42:00 AM

Philip Francis Queeg: dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?

How impoverished must they be for you to feel that they have sufficient pride? Howe much less do you demand they make for the privilege of serving you?


No one is forced to become a teacher
 
2013-06-25 09:42:41 AM

dantheman195: Teacher A
Years of experience: 2
Salary $50,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Excellent

Teacher B
Years of experience: 20
Salary: $90,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Adequate


How did they 'review' a teacher?  How did they compare two of them against each other?

One inescapable fact is that no two teachers teach the same group of students.  Did you take into account that one class might have been an honors class - filled with students pushed by their parents to get a good education and go to college, while the other may be filled with kids simply waiting until they can drop out without the truant officer giving them shiat?

You're trying to base teacher salary and job security off of a condition which is, to a great extent, completely beyond their control.  You might as well be saying you want to get rid of the local weatherman because a tornado hit your town and replace him with one from the next county over where it didn't.
 
2013-06-25 09:43:04 AM

dantheman195: Philip Francis Queeg: dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?

How impoverished must they be for you to feel that they have sufficient pride? Howe much less do you demand they make for the privilege of serving you?

No one is forced to become a teacher


You didn't answer the questions . Try again.
 
2013-06-25 09:46:34 AM

dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?


People like you and the lawmaker FTFA kept telling them they lazy bastards were just in it for an easy job of farking kids over.
 
2013-06-25 09:48:50 AM

Philip Francis Queeg: dantheman195: Philip Francis Queeg: dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?

How impoverished must they be for you to feel that they have sufficient pride? Howe much less do you demand they make for the privilege of serving you?

No one is forced to become a teacher

You didn't answer the questions . Try again.


Whenever I see someone talking about teachers the way he has, I always expect that that person did poorly in school and is bitter about it.
 
2013-06-25 09:50:01 AM

coyo: Philip Francis Queeg: dantheman195: Philip Francis Queeg: dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?

How impoverished must they be for you to feel that they have sufficient pride? Howe much less do you demand they make for the privilege of serving you?

No one is forced to become a teacher

You didn't answer the questions . Try again.

Whenever I see someone talking about teachers the way he has, I always expect that that person did poorly in school and is bitter about it.


Otherwise known as "Scott Walker Syndrome".
 
2013-06-25 09:50:38 AM

ferretman: Karac: The big difference between the U.S. public education system and others in the world is that we have unions that only care about the adults in the system.

The big difference is that in the countries that are beating us, teachers are held in high esteem.  They're paid well, schools are well-funded, and if a problem arises - the government fixes it instead of trying to shift money to private schools.  Not having school districts run by fundamentalist wackos who are more likely to try to ban Harry Potter and established science because they teach Satanism helps too.

For me, it's all about priorities and spending less money that the state takes in. If we do this, we will have a reserve for emergencies and economic downturns so that we can avoid raising yet more taxes.

And other countries probably don't have politicians who consider their children's education to not be a 'priority' or bad schools to not be an emergency worth of raising taxes.

I am a State Representative with core values in smaller, more efficient government, more personal responsibility and less reliance on government in our everyday lives who doesn't realize that she gets paid more than teachers, with better benefits, and gets more days off than they do.  And I don't have to deal with petulant, whiny children - I get to BE ONE.

The problem is that:

It is extremely difficult to get rid of bad teachers (due to the Unions).
Pensions are too generous, everyone else that is not in a Union (w/pension) has to save money to retire.


Teacher's have money withheld from every paycheck to pay for their pension. Where do you get this idea that they somehow aren't saving money like everyone else? They also aren't eligible for Social Security benefits when they hit 65.
 
2013-06-25 09:55:50 AM

dantheman195: Philip Francis Queeg: dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?

How impoverished must they be for you to feel that they have sufficient pride? Howe much less do you demand they make for the privilege of serving you?

No one is forced to become a teacher


But unless you're incredibly stupid, short sighted, or selfish, you WANT people to want to be teachers

Oh. Well, carry on then.
 
2013-06-25 10:01:05 AM

ferretman: Karac: The big difference between the U.S. public education system and others in the world is that we have unions that only care about the adults in the system.

The big difference is that in the countries that are beating us, teachers are held in high esteem.  They're paid well, schools are well-funded, and if a problem arises - the government fixes it instead of trying to shift money to private schools.  Not having school districts run by fundamentalist wackos who are more likely to try to ban Harry Potter and established science because they teach Satanism helps too.

For me, it's all about priorities and spending less money that the state takes in. If we do this, we will have a reserve for emergencies and economic downturns so that we can avoid raising yet more taxes.

And other countries probably don't have politicians who consider their children's education to not be a 'priority' or bad schools to not be an emergency worth of raising taxes.

I am a State Representative with core values in smaller, more efficient government, more personal responsibility and less reliance on government in our everyday lives who doesn't realize that she gets paid more than teachers, with better benefits, and gets more days off than they do.  And I don't have to deal with petulant, whiny children - I get to BE ONE.

The problem is that:

It is extremely difficult to get rid of bad teachers (due to the Unions).
Pensions are too generous, everyone else that is not in a Union (w/pension) has to save money to retire.


Teachers in my state have 14.5% of their lavish salaries deducted towards the pension fund, which is matched by the school.

That generous pension which you so lament is 29% of the average of the best three years of a teacher's salary.
Which is incredibly low even compared to normal full time work, let alone that requiring a college degree.
Teachers save money for retirement. Believe me.
 
2013-06-25 10:01:09 AM

Karac: dantheman195: Teacher A
Years of experience: 2
Salary $50,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Excellent

Teacher B
Years of experience: 20
Salary: $90,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Adequate

How did they 'review' a teacher?  How did they compare two of them against each other?

One inescapable fact is that no two teachers teach the same group of students.  Did you take into account that one class might have been an honors class - filled with students pushed by their parents to get a good education and go to college, while the other may be filled with kids simply waiting until they can drop out without the truant officer giving them shiat?

You're trying to base teacher salary and job security off of a condition which is, to a great extent, completely beyond their control.  You might as well be saying you want to get rid of the local weatherman because a tornado hit your town and replace him with one from the next county over where it didn't.


Professional performance reviews are done yearly in New Jersey school districts and are conducted by the teaching supervisor for the department/building/grade level or however it is organized in that district. Bi-yearly for non-tenured staff (less than 3 years of teaching).

The review is not about the individual students, it is about how the teacher handles those situations. Does the teacher communicate issues to the parents and administration? Just like the weatherman can not make the tornado go out to a open field, it would be more about how he handled the situation and reported it to the news station.
 
2013-06-25 10:01:32 AM
As usual headline from Fark lib is a lie.
 
2013-06-25 10:03:16 AM

factoryconnection: ferretman: It is extremely difficult to get rid of bad teachers (due to the Unions).
Pensions are too generous, everyone else that is not in a Union (w/pension) has to save money to retire.

Bold statements and a good retort, once you justify it.  No blogs please.


http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/bad-teacher-revie w- shock-comedy-doesn-grade-article-1.131188
 
2013-06-25 10:04:36 AM

ferretman: factoryconnection: ferretman: It is extremely difficult to get rid of bad teachers (due to the Unions).
Pensions are too generous, everyone else that is not in a Union (w/pension) has to save money to retire.

Bold statements and a good retort, once you justify it.  No blogs please.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/bad-teacher-revie w- shock-comedy-doesn-grade-article-1.131188


Whoops....wrong link:

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/20-bad-teachers-14-broo kl yn-schools-study-article-1.1241422
 
2013-06-25 10:07:46 AM

ferretman: ferretman: factoryconnection: ferretman: It is extremely difficult to get rid of bad teachers (due to the Unions).
Pensions are too generous, everyone else that is not in a Union (w/pension) has to save money to retire.

Bold statements and a good retort, once you justify it.  No blogs please.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/bad-teacher-revie w- shock-comedy-doesn-grade-article-1.131188

Whoops....wrong link:

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/20-bad-teachers-14-broo kl yn-schools-study-article-1.1241422


I'm retarded (obviously went to public school): http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/raped-girl-family-teachers-fired- a rticle-1.1381512

/This is what happens when I should be paying attention to the webinar I'm involved in.
 
2013-06-25 10:09:03 AM
Good lord - it's not enough to be a judgmental cow anymore, you have to write "open letters" to make sure  everyone knows it.
 
2013-06-25 10:24:30 AM
IlGreven

Remember kiddies: Anyone who takes a public salary is a leech.

/Most of all state representatives.

(for some reason the quote system isnt working for me)

THIS.

I have some friends that as long as we don't talk politics, they are decent people BUT when I worked for a school district in MD, I was totally just taking money from the Government in some kind of handout. I wasnt a teacher, I had to put my 40-60 hours in each week (deadlines), worked summers and did everything a normal computer programmer does in the private sector. Because it was a state job though, I was taking handouts...WTF?

Yes some of the rap is deserved with lazy employees, but you have that in the public and private sector. It is just that the waste in the public sector gets more press with that "OMG UR TAX DOLLERS GOIN' 2 WAIST"
 
2013-06-25 10:31:44 AM
On a given day in my high school, a typical teacher would be in-class for i think 4 of 5 periods, with the other for lunch/admin/prep/marking/etc.  With a class of 25-30 students, that's over a hundred kids per day.

So, State Representative lady, what do YOU think is appropriate compensation for someone whose job requires them to supervise, discipline, control, instruct, and hold the interest of 110 fourteen-year-olds every single day? Apparently you think mockery should be enough for those greedy bastards.
 
2013-06-25 10:36:04 AM

ferretman: Karac: The big difference between the U.S. public education system and others in the world is that we have unions that only care about the adults in the system.

The big difference is that in the countries that are beating us, teachers are held in high esteem.  They're paid well, schools are well-funded, and if a problem arises - the government fixes it instead of trying to shift money to private schools.  Not having school districts run by fundamentalist wackos who are more likely to try to ban Harry Potter and established science because they teach Satanism helps too.

For me, it's all about priorities and spending less money that the state takes in. If we do this, we will have a reserve for emergencies and economic downturns so that we can avoid raising yet more taxes.

And other countries probably don't have politicians who consider their children's education to not be a 'priority' or bad schools to not be an emergency worth of raising taxes.

I am a State Representative with core values in smaller, more efficient government, more personal responsibility and less reliance on government in our everyday lives who doesn't realize that she gets paid more than teachers, with better benefits, and gets more days off than they do.  And I don't have to deal with petulant, whiny children - I get to BE ONE.

The problem is that:

It is extremely difficult to get rid of bad teachers (due to the Unions).
Pensions are too generous, everyone else that is not in a Union (w/pension) has to save money to retire.


That is a complete fallacy. There is no such thing as tenure. Teachers are most certainly NOT protected against vindictive parents, school board members, administrators, or students. Our pensions are tied up in horrible state "investments", and retired teachers in my state haven't had a COLI in over ten years. Hell, I don't even know if I will have a pension when I retire at age 75 (thanks, new retirement "formula!") because the state wants to "reinvest" it into "water projects" and "infrastructure" projects that will go nowhere.

Before you start talking out of your ass, do a little research. I'm sure your teachers taught you how to do that.
 
2013-06-25 10:37:06 AM

THX 1138: On a given day in my high school, a typical teacher would be in-class for i think 4 of 5 periods, with the other for lunch/admin/prep/marking/etc.  With a class of 25-30 students, that's over a hundred kids per day.

So, State Representative lady, what do YOU think is appropriate compensation for someone whose job requires them to supervise, discipline, control, instruct, and hold the interest of 110 fourteen-year-olds every single day? Apparently you think mockery should be enough for those greedy bastards.


I'm in class 6 out of 7 periods a day. My smallest class was 30. My largest was 34. I had 174 students this year, and I teach freshman English.
 
2013-06-25 10:40:40 AM

dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?

Why do we have teachers protesting that they don't get a 5% annual raise just because they exist?

I am sick of this stuff, these unions are getting out of control and we need more politicians to put them back in their place.

Chris Christie is doing this in New Jersey. A few years ago he gave the teachers unions a choice, freeze the salaries going into next year and the state would help you with your budget OR keep your raises and the districts have to make up the differences in other areas, like teacher cuts, student activities, and so forth. Out of the 600+ school districts in NJ less than 50 went with freezing teacher salaries. Even one district the superintendent took a 80K year pay cut to save two teachers, the only district out of 600 where an administrator took a pay cut.

This is sickening, as a tax payer you all should be appalled by the actions of these unions. The NJEA, the State wide teachers union in New Jersey, went as far as stating that any district that amended their contracts to freeze wages into the next school year will receive little or no support from the state wide union.

Let me illustrate what these districts were forced to do by the NJEA

Teacher A
Years of experience: 2
Salary $50,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Excellent

Teacher B
Years of experience: 20
Salary: $90,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Adequate

What some districts did to keep with the 5% raise was:

Make Teacher A 4/5ths of a full time teacher (20 percent pay cut)
New Salary $42,000 plus full benefits

Teacher B still full time, tenure, fogged the mirror the longest
New Salary: $94,500 plus full benefits

^^ That is what the NJEA supported, cut some teachers 20 percent while guaranteeing 5% raises to the mirror foggers

* Some districts laid off teacher A

Now both math classes will get larger, more students/teacher ratio, something the NJEA is publically against, but is all for it if they get to keep their ra ...


My district health insurance for the smallest possible plan to cover me, my husband, and my son costs $1475 a month. That's just medical. Dental is $120 a month. Vision is $87 a month. My salary is $3700 a month. You do the math.

And for the last freaking time: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS FREAKING TENURE. NONE. NADA. ZERO.
 
2013-06-25 10:40:45 AM

tudorgurl: I'm in class 6 out of 7 periods a day. My smallest class was 30. My largest was 34. I had 174 students this year, and I teach freshman English.


Holy fark.  And I thought the situation I described was difficult enough.
 
2013-06-25 10:42:38 AM

dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?


You ever try to pay your bills with pride? Does pride put gas in the car? How many colleges take pride as payment on student loans?
 
2013-06-25 10:42:58 AM

IlGreven: Remember kiddies: Anyone who takes a public salary is a leech.

/Most of all state representatives.


Except for the Pentagon.
 
2013-06-25 10:44:32 AM
I don't get some people.

Let me make sure I get this right... Teachers are somehow supposed to have absolutely no concern about their current financial compensation, or any promise of future tenure bringing the rewards of increased financial security?  Teachers, with their college education, should only have a love of the children?

How incredibly, unforgiveably silly.  "Why don't we continue to take steps to, instead of luring the best and brightest, punish and villify current teachers, making sure we chase away as many talented people from even thinking about the profession as possible?  VOUCHERS FOR EVER!"

Let's recount this, shall we?  Teachers work harder than most.  They have incredibly difficult jobs, often thankless and frustrating, putting in an incredible amount of hours, earning a pension that they are actually paying into (essentially, a 401K with matching) while being denied SS benefits, some working in districts where it's almost impossible to be truly effective because we elect to stuff as many little biters in a room as possible instead of paying for more manageable class sizes, often having to spend more time prepping kids to take some standardized test that will be the primary evaluation of their effectiveness as a teacher, instead of actually giving the kids an education... oh, a test that many kids honestly don't give a flying fark about... and you think you get to complain about them?  Who the hell are you?  Education is the backbone of a functional, competitive society, and you want to, what, take away incentives to become a teacher?  Because, what, freedom?

Die.
 
2013-06-25 10:47:54 AM

dantheman195: What ever happened to the pride of teaching/public service?

Why do we have teachers protesting that they don't get a 5% annual raise just because they exist?

I am sick of this stuff, these unions are getting out of control and we need more politicians to put them back in their place.

Chris Christie is doing this in New Jersey. A few years ago he gave the teachers unions a choice, freeze the salaries going into next year and the state would help you with your budget OR keep your raises and the districts have to make up the differences in other areas, like teacher cuts, student activities, and so forth. Out of the 600+ school districts in NJ less than 50 went with freezing teacher salaries. Even one district the superintendent took a 80K year pay cut to save two teachers, the only district out of 600 where an administrator took a pay cut.

This is sickening, as a tax payer you all should be appalled by the actions of these unions. The NJEA, the State wide teachers union in New Jersey, went as far as stating that any district that amended their contracts to freeze wages into the next school year will receive little or no support from the state wide union.

Let me illustrate what these districts were forced to do by the NJEA

Teacher A
Years of experience: 2
Salary $50,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Excellent

Teacher B
Years of experience: 20
Salary: $90,000 a year plus benefits
Reviews: Adequate

What some districts did to keep with the 5% raise was:

Make Teacher A 4/5ths of a full time teacher (20 percent pay cut)
New Salary $42,000 plus full benefits

Teacher B still full time, tenure, fogged the mirror the longest
New Salary: $94,500 plus full benefits

^^ That is what the NJEA supported, cut some teachers 20 percent while guaranteeing 5% raises to the mirror foggers

* Some districts laid off teacher A

Now both math classes will get larger, more students/teacher ratio, something the NJEA is publically against, but is all for it if they get to keep their raises.


Bull. ESPECIALLY when a union is involved, teacher salaries rise, fall, or freeze together based on the same criteria.

There is no way teacher B gets a raise while teacher A got a cut.

/Unless teacher B had done something to deserve an even bigger raise and their smaller raise represents an equivilant cut off their new salary. But I don't see the math working out to make that possible.
//in my wife's district wages have been frozen for 5 years FOR EVERYONE
///in my district we had several furlough days which EVERYONE took- regardless of seniority
 
2013-06-25 10:48:25 AM
OK, let's say you're an experienced teacher making $60K a year. You "only" work 180 days a year. By comparison, someone in the private sector with two weeks of vacation works about 240 days a year, so compared to someone making $60K in the private sector, you get the same amount of pay for 75% of the work. So the $60K teacher is actually making $80K. So what? Aren't our teachers worth $80K a year? What's the big deal? You're willing to pay top dollar to hire a CEO to steer the development of your company, but you're not willing to pay top dollar to hire a teacher to steer the development of your child? Are you nuts? Jeesh, gimme a friggin  break.
 
2013-06-25 10:50:21 AM
Some background here: Washington's state Supreme Court recently ruled that the state legislature is failing to meet its constitutionally mandated duty to fully fund basic education. The Court took the highly unusual step of retaining jurisdiction in the case, requiring the legislature to provide periodic status reports documenting the steps being taken to meet that duty. It is generally accepted by all interested parties that complying with the Court's order will cost the state somewhere between $1 billion and $2 billion per year, at a time when the state is hurting for revenue (Washington doesn't have a state income tax, relying instead on sales taxes, so recent economic weakness has hurt revenues dramatically).

What I think is coming is a constitutional crisis. There are those in the legislature who believe that the Court has no authority to demand that the legislature do anything, and they have one vocal ally on the Court. There will be considerable fireworks over the issue in the months and years to come.
 
2013-06-25 10:50:56 AM

clambam: You "only" work 180 days a year.


Nope.
 
2013-06-25 10:53:04 AM

tudorgurl: My district health insurance for the smallest possible plan to cover me, my husband, and my son costs $1475 a month. That's just medical. Dental is $120 a month. Vision is $87 a month. My salary is $3700 a month. You do the math.

And for the last freaking time: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS FREAKING TENURE. NONE. NADA. ZERO.


$1475 a month?  That's seriously criminal.

OH, and English Teacher's rock.  Hey, slayer of "be verbs," you go on with your bad self.  :p
 
2013-06-25 10:54:24 AM

THX 1138: tudorgurl: I'm in class 6 out of 7 periods a day. My smallest class was 30. My largest was 34. I had 174 students this year, and I teach freshman English.

Holy fark.  And I thought the situation I described was difficult enough.


And they're talking about increasing our class sizes because they don't have enough money to hire new teachers. I'm being moved to teach English I Pre-Advanced Placement (which I'm stoked about), but there are only 2 PAP English I teachers...and there's 325 kids signed up for the course. You do the math. They can't have any of the other teachers take on any PAP I courses because they are just as slammed. The other PAP I teacher has two sections of English III, so that means I'm getting the lion's share. That averages out to 35 kids a class. I won't get my stipend for coaching three major UIL events this year (one of them being Lincoln-Douglas debate, which averages about 6-8 hours a week of prep and coaching, and if my kids don't show up to district, I will not get the money), so I have to do that for nothing. Last year I averaged 85-90 hours a week between teaching, grading, tutoring, and lesson planning (most of which was done on the weekends).

At this point in the state of Texas, I am grateful to have a job. They've laid off hundreds of thousands of teachers here because of budget cuts, and the state lege is plaing politics with our educational system.

But I'm the farking enemy.
 
2013-06-25 10:55:35 AM

deeyablo: tudorgurl: My district health insurance for the smallest possible plan to cover me, my husband, and my son costs $1475 a month. That's just medical. Dental is $120 a month. Vision is $87 a month. My salary is $3700 a month. You do the math.

And for the last freaking time: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS FREAKING TENURE. NONE. NADA. ZERO.

$1475 a month?  That's seriously criminal.

OH, and English Teacher's rock.  Hey, slayer of "be verbs," you go on with your bad self.  :p


That's Texas state "health care". And they're reducing services available to us.
 
2013-06-25 10:55:42 AM

deeyablo: tudorgurl: My district health insurance for the smallest possible plan to cover me, my husband, and my son costs $1475 a month. That's just medical. Dental is $120 a month. Vision is $87 a month. My salary is $3700 a month. You do the math.

And for the last freaking time: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS FREAKING TENURE. NONE. NADA. ZERO.

$1475 a month?  That's seriously criminal.

OH, and English Teacher's rock.  Hey, slayer of "be verbs," you go on with your bad self.  :p


And yes, I misued that apostrophe.  I know that will affect my grade.  I am not suggesting anything about your rock.
 
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