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(Daily Mail)   Seeing the world through the eyes of a dementia sufferer is an experience you won't soon forget   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 71
    More: Sad, suffering, dementia  
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15853 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Jun 2013 at 3:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-25 01:26:18 AM  
An 8-minute long experience is not getting "into the mind" of a dementia patient. It's a staged inconvenience, something equivalently meaningful to an extra round through a traffic circle.
 
2013-06-25 01:42:09 AM  

Pocket Ninja: An 8-minute long experience is not getting "into the mind" of a dementia patient. It's a staged inconvenience, something equivalently meaningful to an extra round through a traffic circle.


Look, kids -- Big Ben! Thorazine!
 
2013-06-25 03:12:52 AM  
I wonder how long before they have this as a feature at the amusement park.
 
2013-06-25 03:16:39 AM  
Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.
 
2013-06-25 03:19:50 AM  

themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.


I hate to be the one to tell you this, but you might have dementia.
 
2013-06-25 03:20:32 AM  
When you start getting older and falling deeper into dementia, old habits reappear. What seemed normal is now frightening and it takes all you've got to fight that feeling of dread. It feels like everywhere you go things are working against you and everyone is after you.

It's pretty heavy, man.
 
2013-06-25 03:26:44 AM  
To experience dementia, try to read this sign.

i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2013-06-25 03:29:42 AM  

themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.


I would hate to be the one that tells you, but you might have dementia yourself.
 
2013-06-25 03:32:27 AM  

Pocket Ninja: An 8-minute long experience is not getting "into the mind" of a dementia patient. It's a staged inconvenience, something equivalently meaningful to an extra round through a traffic circle.


When I was in college, a bunch of rich crackers junior decided to protest the plight of the homeless by getting some brand new North Face tents and sleeping bags and having a weeklong camp out in front of their dorms. Words could not express my disgust.
 
2013-06-25 03:33:27 AM  

farkingismybusiness: themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.

I would hate to be the one that tells you, but you might have dementia yourself.


Actually, it's mostly step 1 that's weird. The rest I think I get.
 
2013-06-25 03:34:57 AM  
Nice headline subby
 
2013-06-25 03:37:19 AM  

themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.


I sorry to tell you this, but I think you might have dementia.
 
2013-06-25 03:37:57 AM  
My grandmother has it.....has......? What were we talking about? Come here kitty.....
 
2013-06-25 03:38:50 AM  
Or you could just try to read some Politic threads.
 
2013-06-25 03:40:58 AM  
Before I click this: Is this just another beer ad?
 
2013-06-25 03:45:54 AM  

farkingismybusiness: themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.

I sorry to tell you this, but I think you might have dementia.


I'm sorry to tell you this, but I think you might have Alzheimer's.
 
2013-06-25 03:47:17 AM  
Find paper, write note to family, make it nice and short, set table, fold towel. drink some water and wait a minute this sounds like instructions for suicide.
 
2013-06-25 03:49:48 AM  
I'm glad I live in a state where assisted suicide is legal, because if I ever get like that I don't want to be around anymore.
 
2013-06-25 03:50:25 AM  

The All-Powerful Atheismo: farkingismybusiness: themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.

I sorry to tell you this, but I think you might have dementia.

I'm sorry to tell you this, but I think you might have Alzheimer's.


i.qkme.me

themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.


I hate to be the one to tell you this, but you might have dementia.
 
2013-06-25 03:51:28 AM  

farkingismybusiness: themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.

I hate to be the one to tell you this, but you might have dementia.


I'm glad to tell you this, because I think I can give you a clean bill of health.
 
2013-06-25 03:51:46 AM  

C18H27NO3: I wonder how long before they have this as a feature at the amusement park as a daily segment on Fox News.

 
2013-06-25 03:57:19 AM  

themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.


I won't say you have dementia like everyone else. I agree with you, that taken literally it doesn't make sense.  That, however, is the point.  You fill in the blanks to compensate. Someone with dementia loses information in the transmission of instructions (what the printed sheet shows by different sized letters, half words, and bolding) .  For example, Step 1: Cut a hole in the box.  Were it reduced to 1: Hole in box, you would still know what to do.  For someone with dementia, Step: cut a box, what, hole, huh?

/fark, I'm depressed now
 
2013-06-25 03:57:50 AM  
Why am I feeling deja vu right now?
 
2013-06-25 04:05:37 AM  

Point02GPA: Or you could just try to read some Politic threads.


Or just od on acid.

That was an interesting (not fun) night.
 
2013-06-25 04:05:43 AM  

themindiswatching: Why am I feeling deja vu right now?


 i1.ytimg.com
APPROVES
 
2013-06-25 04:10:15 AM  

themindiswatching: Those instructions seem confusing even without the glasses.


I assumed it was written in some kind of limey jargon. It's total gibberish except the line that sort of hints at pouring a glass of water.
 
2013-06-25 04:12:11 AM  
My mom had alzheimer's. She was diagnosed the summer i graduated high school. It really messed me up watching her struggles with it.

I think the worst part was watching her so called friends basically avoid her, and not answering her phone calls.
 
2013-06-25 04:15:30 AM  

UncleStumpy: My mom had alzheimer's. She was diagnosed the summer i graduated high school. It really messed me up watching her struggles with it.

I think the worst part was watching her so called friends basically avoid her, and not answering her phone calls.


I joke about it, but it really hits close to home for me as well. One of the worst diseases out there in my opinion. Robs you of your identity.
 
2013-06-25 04:20:57 AM  

Point02GPA: Or you could just try to read some Politic threads.


That's more like having schizophrenia.
 
2013-06-25 04:30:47 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: When you start getting older and falling deeper into dementia, old habits reappear. What seemed normal is now frightening and it takes all you've got to fight that feeling of dread. It feels like everywhere you go things are working against you and everyone is after you.

It's pretty heavy, man.


sounds a little like paranoia. being diagnosed with paranoia doesn't make it go away or easier to live with. you just know you were diagnosed a paranoid.
 
2013-06-25 04:34:13 AM  

Point02GPA: Or you could just try to read some Politic threads.


Is English not your first language or are you drunk?


/would accept drunk as an excuse
 
2013-06-25 04:41:20 AM  
I can't tell if it is me or sun/oracle that has dementia when dealing with javax/servlet/http/HttpServlet.

[jackiechanWTFamIreading.jpg]
 
2013-06-25 05:04:31 AM  
www.reed.edu
 
2013-06-25 05:08:00 AM  
And here I was so looking forward to old age.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-25 05:25:09 AM  
Reagan did the simulation for eight years...
 
2013-06-25 05:35:23 AM  
Here is hoping that my memory exercises will help. Evidence is not there, sadly.
 
2013-06-25 05:55:30 AM  
I work in a hospital so I'm really getting a kick out of... getting a kick out of... getting a kick out of?

ENNYway

50% of the patients here have some level of dementia. The implications are SO far reaching. they're more likely to suffer from malnutrition and dehydration because they can be too confused to eat and nurses don't have time for one on one care. They forget they can't stand easily and are very prone to falls. They have to be taken to radiology for tests, which is time consuming and expensive in resources. When you put someone with a degree of cognitive impairment in a strange place (ie A&E waiting room) they get more cognitively impaired, often becoming frightened and aggressive, which is very upsetting for family.
 
2013-06-25 06:08:18 AM  
I can remember relatives being diagnosed with senility back in the 60's, and everyone sort of assumed that it was just part of getting older.  The family knew to slow down for grandma or the crazy uncle, but today it's all about unloading the elderly or medicating them into submission.  This is the trade off, die relatively young (70+) with relatively intact faculties, or live to old age (80+) with many more limitations.
 
2013-06-25 06:22:43 AM  

PreMortem: Point02GPA: Or you could just try to read some Politic threads.

Is English not your first language or are you drunk?


/would accept drunk as an excuse


Drug
 
2013-06-25 06:34:38 AM  
I don't understand what the point of this is supposed to be. For one, no this really isn't going to let you see what it is like to have dementia, and that aside even if it did what of it? It is, sadly, not something that is cured or made any better by people "understanding" it " feeling bad about it". My grandma has Alzheimers (well presumably, you don't actually know what kind of dementia it is until there's an autopsy  but that is the most likely) and it really sucks. She is slowly sliding down the scale, and will continue to do so until she dies. She can still communicate, though it is confused, but can't care for herself to any degree anymore. She had to move to a managed care facility because even simple things had gotten too hard. She's still happy and active for the moment, but unfortunately there's only so long that will last, probably a year max. It is a shiatty, shiatty way to go.

However it won't be solved by pity, it won't be solved by trying to make people feel bad, it'll be solved by research. Grandma isn't going to have it solved, of course, but others. The answer isn't "awareness" the answer is understanding the disorder, and how to stop it. It isn't a social thing, it isn't a political thing, it is a physical thing. Something goes wrong with the brain. Fixing it is in the realm of science and medicine, this isn't something that can be "understood" away.

It really sucks, because it isn't like many other disabilities or infirmities of age where you can make accommodations of various sorts to allow someone to work around it. Your mind just stops working properly. There's fark-all that can be done, other than to have caregivers that take care of the things you can't. It is a serious public health issue and one that needs research.
 
2013-06-25 06:34:44 AM  
Now we just need Virtual Morbid Obesity so people in third world countries can feel how westerns feel.
 
2013-06-25 06:36:13 AM  

HotWingAgenda: Pocket Ninja: An 8-minute long experience is not getting "into the mind" of a dementia patient. It's a staged inconvenience, something equivalently meaningful to an extra round through a traffic circle.

When I was in college, a bunch of rich crackers junior decided to protest the plight of the homeless by getting some brand new North Face tents and sleeping bags and having a weeklong camp out in front of their dorms. Words could not express my disgust.


Seriously? Did you at least punch one of them in counter-counter-protest? I don't usually advocate violence but there are times in life when it's the only tool that will be of use. And it's the only language douchebags understand.

Dude, just hearing you tell that story starts a boiling rage in me.
 
2013-06-25 06:43:29 AM  

farkingismybusiness: I joke about it, but it really hits close to home for me as well. One of the worst diseases out there in my opinion. Robs you of your identity.


Having dementia is not too bad for the person with it, though it can be hell for the family. Getting dementia, on the other hand, is brutally horrible.
 
2013-06-25 06:57:08 AM  
43 posts, and no Harrison Bergeron references? Fark, I am disappoint.
 
2013-06-25 06:59:02 AM  

sycraft: My grandma has Alzheimers (well presumably, you don't actually know what kind of dementia it is until there's an autopsy  but that is the most likely) and it really sucks. She is slowly sliding down the scale, and will continue to do so until she dies. She can still communicate, though it is confused, but can't care for herself to any degree anymore. She had to move to a managed care facility because even simple things had gotten too hard. She's still happy and active for the moment, but unfortunately there's only so long that will last, probably a year max. It is a shiatty, shiatty way to go.


Sigh. I've been in a similar situation. I had to move to look after mine. While it didn't appear to be full-on dementia, the spark was no longer there, and simple tasks became sadly insurmountable. I drove her car when she needed to go the bank (refusal of computers) and I got her groceries and did maintenance around her house. She was on an oxygen machine, to boot. It was very sad to watch, as she was a firebrand in her younger years. This was not a woman you wanted to disappoint or you would get an earful (sometimes a slap-full). But Father Time just wore her down, eventually.

He awaits us all.
 
2013-06-25 07:04:12 AM  

dickfreckle: HotWingAgenda: Pocket Ninja: An 8-minute long experience is not getting "into the mind" of a dementia patient. It's a staged inconvenience, something equivalently meaningful to an extra round through a traffic circle.

When I was in college, a bunch of rich crackers junior decided to protest the plight of the homeless by getting some brand new North Face tents and sleeping bags and having a weeklong camp out in front of their dorms. Words could not express my disgust.

Seriously? Did you at least punch one of them in counter-counter-protest? I don't usually advocate violence but there are times in life when it's the only tool that will be of use. And it's the only language douchebags understand.

Dude, just hearing you tell that story starts a boiling rage in me.


In my city they do "homeless for a night". Same idea. 

To really get the full homeless experience, you should make it a week. For the first 3 days, you get sexually abused. Then you have to stay drunk for 2 days solid to try to get rid of the pain. Then you have to be forbidden from speaking English or doing anything that makes you feel normal or comfortable. THEN you get to spend a night outside.

/Assholes.
 
2013-06-25 07:08:53 AM  

vudutek: 43 posts, and no Harrison Bergeron references? Fark, I am disappoint.


*
 
2013-06-25 07:23:38 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: When you start getting older and falling deeper into dementia, old habits reappear. What seemed normal is now frightening and it takes all you've got to fight that feeling of dread. It feels like everywhere you go things are working against you and everyone is after you.

It's pretty heavy, man.


Exactly. My Mom no longer remembers how to wash her hair and her hair was always very important (being a redhair) and special to her. As an example she had cuttings of her hair going back from when she was a child. Even during the beginning of her Alzheimers and later stages she kept her hair up and then Wham something change and no longer.

The frustration and you are right dread that she is feeling when she can't remember how to do something normal is apparent in her eyes and expressions. the only good is that it normally doesn't last long.

What this test doesn't do is allow the feeling of not know who people are or the not knowing why you are where you are. My Mom is always wanting to go home but can't tell me where home is
 
2013-06-25 07:27:12 AM  
Any step forward in an effort to understand and empathize with that condition is good. I suspect 8 minutes is enough for most care givers and nurses, since it's not the only training they're going to receive when it comes to dementia and Alzheimer care. If it's not enough then they have a base template to work from and improve on.
 
2013-06-25 07:36:51 AM  

sycraft: However it won't be solved by pity, it won't be solved by trying to make people feel bad, it'll be solved by research.


The point of exercises like this isn't to "solve" Alzheimer's. It's to give care staff and others who live or work with people with Alzheimer's a better appreciation of what it's like so they can adapt or modify their practice suitably. In a similar way, pilots learning to fly on instruments may use "foggles", which blur everything except the instrument panel. They don't "solve" clouds, but they help develop skills for cloud flying.
 
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