Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Washington Post)   Senator from Hawaii points out a wee tiny flaw in the current immigration bill: by determining immigration eligibility by adding up points for education and job experience, we're embracing the insitutional discrimination women face in other countries   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 8
    More: Interesting, Hawaii, immigration bill, Hirono, female senators, discrimination, senator  
•       •       •

870 clicks; posted to Politics » on 24 Jun 2013 at 12:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-06-24 11:35:51 AM  
4 votes:
This is An incredibly salient point.

It's hard to explain just how overwhelmingly disadvantaged women in developing countries are, unless you have seen it first hand. In many if not most developing countries, girls are less likely to be educated (if you have to pay school fees, and you don't have money for all your kids, girls are the first ones to be pulled), less likely to have employment history (if you start pooping out one kid per year at 17, you're not too likely to have much a of a resume, are you), and less likely to ever finish ahead of any men under this system.

The only way many women would make it in would be as dependents, and I can think of few ideas LESS American than 'all men are created equal, except when they got shafted by the unequal system in their home country, then fark you...we don't want your kind here at all'. Not exactly 'give me your tired, your poor, your huddle masses yearning to breathe free', now, is it.
2013-06-24 12:05:57 PM  
3 votes:
Men. We're obligated to address discrimination within our own country, not other countries. It makes choose candidates for immigration based on education and job experience because these people are most likely to contribute to our society. If discriminatory practices by other nations unfairly make certain foreign citizens ineligible for immigration to the US, the fault lies with their home countries, not the US immigration policy.
2013-06-24 12:14:53 PM  
2 votes:
The senator is correct, but so is JesusJuice. It doesn't just affect women, but anyone whose gender/religious/ethnic/etc. group is treated poorly and unable to avail themselves of education, whether due to social or economic causes.

Also, dionysusaur has a pretty good point, I just don't think most of the country or the people who run it really care. They like disposable workers.
2013-06-24 10:04:11 PM  
1 votes:

cptjeff: Ishidan: That poem was probably the best joke France ever played on America.

France gave us the statue, Emma Lazarus, a Jewish girl whose family's New York City roots went back to the revolution, gave us the poem.


In regards to TFA: Sen. Hirono is dead on here, but I suspect that she'll find that for some of her fellow Senators, that's a feature rather than a bug. And by that, I mean to say that Republicans hate women.


It's not an issue of hating women.  It's an issue of immigration being for the benefit of the host country.  The United States is better off if it's accepting doctors before burger flippers.  Immigration policy is not the place to address another country's humanitarian policies.
2013-06-24 02:50:49 PM  
1 votes:
It's a tough choice. Do we use our limited resources to fix humanitarian issues and give poor people a better life, or to help our own country and do what's best for us, even if that means the people we let in are a little less needy than they could be?
2013-06-24 12:24:45 PM  
1 votes:

JesusJuice: Men. We're obligated to address discrimination within our own country, not other countries. It makes choose candidates for immigration based on education and job experience because these people are most likely to contribute to our society. If discriminatory practices by other nations unfairly make certain foreign citizens ineligible for immigration to the US, the fault lies with their home countries, not the US immigration policy.


Bears
Bears
Bears
2013-06-24 12:08:47 PM  
1 votes:
we're also declaring we have neither need nor desire to let in any manuel laborers.
if we don't have a realistic guest worker program, we're gonna have undocs coming in to pick the crops.
2013-06-24 11:45:23 AM  
1 votes:

whistleridge: This is An incredibly salient point.

It's hard to explain just how overwhelmingly disadvantaged women in developing countries are, unless you have seen it first hand. In many if not most developing countries, girls are less likely to be educated (if you have to pay school fees, and you don't have money for all your kids, girls are the first ones to be pulled), less likely to have employment history (if you start pooping out one kid per year at 17, you're not too likely to have much a of a resume, are you), and less likely to ever finish ahead of any men under this system.

The only way many women would make it in would be as dependents, and I can think of few ideas LESS American than 'all men are created equal, except when they got shafted by the unequal system in their home country, then fark you...we don't want your kind here at all'. Not exactly 'give me your tired, your poor, your huddle masses yearning to breathe free', now, is it.


Yeah I was pretty impressed, and have to admit I hadn't thought of it either.  It might help that the Senator's own personal history highlights this very problem so she's likely more aware of it than most.   But not sure what criteria you can replace it with.
 
Displayed 8 of 8 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report