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(Costa Mesa Daily Pilot)   Leigh Steinberg says that researchers are tantalizingly close to technologies that will reduce 90% of the energy wave that can cause concussions, the primary cause of long trm brane injruy adn permnaet branid amge   (dailypilot.com) divider line 27
    More: Cool, Leigh Steinberg, photons, engineers, concussion, space launch  
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1589 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 Jun 2013 at 8:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-24 08:44:25 AM  
I read that as "...reduce 90% of the energy wave that can cause consciousness..." and I have beer in my fridge so I thought maybe I could score some grant money.
 
2013-06-24 08:59:15 AM  
On the prevention front, I met with a woman with a new helmet design, that will be announced soon, that attenuates 90% of the energy wave that occurs from a blow to the head.

I don't believe it. I don't care what novel materials you have, or what interesting designs you've built into your helmet. There are constraints to how much padding you can have in a helmet, and those constraints limit how much you can spread the same amount of energy out over a period of time. At some point, you're going to have to surrender to the peak impulse.
 
2013-06-24 09:02:24 AM  
Bake the hall in the candle of his brain!
 
2013-06-24 09:09:34 AM  
Popular Science did a great, detailed article on better helmet designs, and how NOBODY will manufacture them, because they are making good money using the safety standards they've rigged for years, and the upgrade to new technology would expose the manufacturers to lawsuits, as well as obsolrting their entire product lines overnight.

So, enjoy your full body paralysis, accident victims, but know that the shareholders for those companies are doing farking GREAT.
 
2013-06-24 09:12:05 AM  

t3knomanser: On the prevention front, I met with a woman with a new helmet design, that will be announced soon, that attenuates 90% of the energy wave that occurs from a blow to the head.

I don't believe it. I don't care what novel materials you have, or what interesting designs you've built into your helmet. There are constraints to how much padding you can have in a helmet, and those constraints limit how much you can spread the same amount of energy out over a period of time. At some point, you're going to have to surrender to the peak impulse.


Read as "tantalizing close to getting some grants/investment money".
 
2013-06-24 09:25:27 AM  
The peak impact can't be reduced. You can't take something moving at 10-15 MPH and bring it to a stop suddenly without impact to the brain inside the skull. Physics says that happens regardless of how much you pad the outside.

Sports like boxing, football, or foot ball all have interaction with the head in bad ways.

/bad sports, in my opinion.
 
2013-06-24 09:37:37 AM  

farker99: You can't take something moving at 10-15 MPH and bring it to a stop suddenly without impact to the brain inside the skull.


Worse- you take something moving at 6m/s in one direction, and change its velocity to 6m/s in the opposite direction and  then a sudden stop when it hits the turf.

farker99: bad sports, in my opinion.


The only thing bad is that people try and downplay the cognitive effects. The "rub some dirt on your brain damage" approach clouds the issue and prevents people from making informed decisions about what they do with their bodies. "Look, you have a very high probability of being turned into a drooling idiot. Which is why we're going to give you millions of dollars."
 
2013-06-24 09:41:28 AM  

t3knomanser: On the prevention front, I met with a woman with a new helmet design, that will be announced soon, that attenuates 90% of the energy wave that occurs from a blow to the head.

I don't believe it. I don't care what novel materials you have, or what interesting designs you've built into your helmet. There are constraints to how much padding you can have in a helmet, and those constraints limit how much you can spread the same amount of energy out over a period of time. At some point, you're going to have to surrender to the peak impulse.


Easy, make a bigger helmet.
 
2013-06-24 09:54:44 AM  

DoBeDoBeDo: Easy, make a bigger helmet.


There are constraints about how big you can make that helmet and still have something wearable. Plus, the bigger the helmet gets, the heavier it gets. And you know what that means? It means an increase in paralyzing neck injuries when people's heads get twisted around. There's more leverage (because the helmet is larger in radius) and more momentum (because the helmet is larger in mass).

As an aside, that's why they don't put padding on the outside of the helmets, by the way. They tried it, but padding has far more friction than the helmet, meaning collisions were far more likely to torque the neck.
 
2013-06-24 10:04:12 AM  
Great. Now I've got Bob Nelson's schtick about "dain bramage" running through my head.

/because the mind is a terrible thing
 
2013-06-24 10:41:02 AM  

t3knomanser: On the prevention front, I met with a woman with a new helmet design, that will be announced soon, that attenuates 90% of the energy wave that occurs from a blow to the head.

I don't believe it. I don't care what novel materials you have, or what interesting designs you've built into your helmet. There are constraints to how much padding you can have in a helmet, and those constraints limit how much you can spread the same amount of energy out over a period of time. At some point, you're going to have to surrender to the peak impulse.


Article doesn't say what the current standard is.  20%? 80%?

Any Pie Left: Popular Science did a great, detailed article on better helmet designs, and how NOBODY will manufacture them, because they are making good money using the safety standards they've rigged for years, and the upgrade to new technology would expose the manufacturers to lawsuits, as well as obsolrting their entire product lines overnight.

So, enjoy your full body paralysis, accident victims, but know that the shareholders for those companies are doing farking GREAT.


Is that the one that talks about how attached face-shields are better for cuncussive blasts?
 
2013-06-24 10:42:07 AM  

Any Pie Left: Popular Science did a great, detailed article on better helmet designs, and how NOBODY will manufacture them, because they are making good money using the safety standards they've rigged for years, and the upgrade to new technology would expose the manufacturers to lawsuits, as well as obsolrting their entire product lines overnight.

So, enjoy your full body paralysis, accident victims, but know that the shareholders for those companies are doing farking GREAT.


Also, big pharm is trying to kill everyone, and the government knows about a car that runs on water but had the inventors killed.
 
2013-06-24 10:57:46 AM  

t3knomanser: DoBeDoBeDo: Easy, make a bigger helmet.

There are constraints about how big you can make that helmet and still have something wearable. Plus, the bigger the helmet gets, the heavier it gets. And you know what that means? It means an increase in paralyzing neck injuries when people's heads get twisted around. There's more leverage (because the helmet is larger in radius) and more momentum (because the helmet is larger in mass).

As an aside, that's why they don't put padding on the outside of the helmets, by the way. They tried it, but padding has far more friction than the helmet, meaning collisions were far more likely to torque the neck.


Yes but those are constraints on a USEABLE helmet, not on a helmet that stops 90% of the energy of a hit.  :)
 
2013-06-24 10:59:37 AM  

PanicMan: Article doesn't say what the current standard is.  20%? 80%?


Well, the problem is that "energy waves" have nothing to do with anything. The important factor is the peak impulse. That's a function of how much their head's momentum changes in a unit of time, which in turn depends on the total force and how long their head is being accelerated. All padding does is reduce the peak impulse by storing some of the force and releasing it through the padding. Very little energy is actually lost to the deformation of the padding, relative to the total amount of energy (there's a lot of kinetic energy in a linebacker making a tackle). It's not about  energy. It's about impulse.

But even if it were about energy, if this somehow magically absorbed 90% of the energy, it means I could hit you in the head with a sledgehammer and you wouldn't stagger at all. It's absurd. Now, we're hearing this third-hand from somebody that's not a scientist, who was probably told the details by someone who wasn't a scientist. But a 90% reduction in "energy waves" is pure bullshiat. A 90% reduction in concussion incidence for a given amount of peak impulse? That would be something interesting.
 
2013-06-24 11:04:47 AM  

Any Pie Left: Popular Science did a great, detailed article on better helmet designs, and how NOBODY will manufacture them, because they are making good money using the safety standards they've rigged for years, and the upgrade to new technology would expose the manufacturers to lawsuits, as well as obsolrting their entire product lines overnight.

So, enjoy your full body paralysis, accident victims, but know that the shareholders for those companies are doing farking GREAT.


Got a link?
 
2013-06-24 11:15:31 AM  

PanicMan: t3knomanser: On the prevention front, I met with a woman with a new helmet design, that will be announced soon, that attenuates 90% of the energy wave that occurs from a blow to the head.

I don't believe it. I don't care what novel materials you have, or what interesting designs you've built into your helmet. There are constraints to how much padding you can have in a helmet, and those constraints limit how much you can spread the same amount of energy out over a period of time. At some point, you're going to have to surrender to the peak impulse.

Article doesn't say what the current standard is.  20%? 80%?


There is probably information out there, but the best I could find quickly was that the best helmets are more than halve the peak force compared to the worst - so if we assume the worst actually still help a little (say 20-30%?) then the better ones are probably around 60-65%
 
2013-06-24 11:26:44 AM  
Felt like reading Flowers for Algernon.
 
2013-06-24 11:28:04 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2013-06-24 11:33:59 AM  

t3knomanser: On the prevention front, I met with a woman with a new helmet design, that will be announced soon, that attenuates 90% of the energy wave that occurs from a blow to the head.

I don't believe it. I don't care what novel materials you have, or what interesting designs you've built into your helmet. There are constraints to how much padding you can have in a helmet, and those constraints limit how much you can spread the same amount of energy out over a period of time. At some point, you're going to have to surrender to the peak impulse.


Huh? Who are you and how did you dispose of t3k's body?

Let me see.

Columbus's first plane at Kitty Hawk only had 12 bytes of RAM so anything is possible.

3D printing.

Private space colonies.

Nanometamaterials.

Right?

Let me guess again. For some reason, this helmet story is a lot closer to your sphere of knowledge IRL, so you see it more clearly?
 
2013-06-24 12:12:45 PM  

DoBeDoBeDo: Easy, make a bigger helmet.


img.fark.net
 
2013-06-24 12:46:25 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: t3knomanser: On the prevention front, I met with a woman with a new helmet design, that will be announced soon, that attenuates 90% of the energy wave that occurs from a blow to the head.

I don't believe it. I don't care what novel materials you have, or what interesting designs you've built into your helmet. There are constraints to how much padding you can have in a helmet, and those constraints limit how much you can spread the same amount of energy out over a period of time. At some point, you're going to have to surrender to the peak impulse.

Huh? Who are you and how did you dispose of t3k's body?

Let me see.

Columbus's first plane at Kitty Hawk only had 12 bytes of RAM so anything is possible.

3D printing.

Private space colonies.

Nanometamaterials.

Right?

Let me guess again. For some reason, this helmet story is a lot closer to your sphere of knowledge IRL, so you see it more clearly?


What an abusive cock you are. I'm sure your mother is proud.
 
2013-06-24 12:52:31 PM  

t3knomanser: PanicMan: Article doesn't say what the current standard is.  20%? 80%?

Well, the problem is that "energy waves" have nothing to do with anything. The important factor is the peak impulse. That's a function of how much their head's momentum changes in a unit of time, which in turn depends on the total force and how long their head is being accelerated. All padding does is reduce the peak impulse by storing some of the force and releasing it through the padding. Very little energy is actually lost to the deformation of the padding, relative to the total amount of energy (there's a lot of kinetic energy in a linebacker making a tackle). It's not about  energy. It's about impulse.

But even if it were about energy, if this somehow magically absorbed 90% of the energy, it means I could hit you in the head with a sledgehammer and you wouldn't stagger at all. It's absurd. Now, we're hearing this third-hand from somebody that's not a scientist, who was probably told the details by someone who wasn't a scientist. But a 90% reduction in "energy waves" is pure bullshiat. A 90% reduction in concussion incidence for a given amount of peak impulse? That would be something interesting.


I wonder if they could design a helmet that would actually be deformed by the impact--the "crumple zone" approach.  It would probably be ridiculous for football or hockey, but I could see it for batting helmets where you don't get an impact on every play.
 
2013-06-24 01:04:26 PM  

TopoGigo: What an abusive cock you are. I'm sure your mother is proud.


Why are people so sensitive here? We go from making jokes about people being crushed in front of their kid, but don't you dare tell someone they have unrealistic expectations about science and technology!

/I get it
//Don't mock people's religion
//Alright I get it
 
2013-06-24 01:18:37 PM  

TopoGigo: What an abusive cock you are. I'm sure your mother is proud.


The hilarious part is that I think space colonization is a pipe dream in any nearby time horizon, but because I think it's eventually both  possible and  necessary, I'm a "space nutter" according to <b>QA</b> (oh, I also think robotic space exploration is very important for our understanding of the universe, especially the planet Earth, which is a planet most of us consider fairly important, so yes, total space nutter).

ArkPanda: I wonder if they could design a helmet that would actually be deformed by the impact--the "crumple zone" approach.  It would probably be ridiculous for football or hockey, but I could see it for batting helmets where you don't get an impact on every play.


Bicycle helmets fall into that category- they're not designed to survive an impact, they're designed so that  you survive an impact. I'm not sure how well that would actually translate to batting helmets.
 
2013-06-24 01:49:31 PM  
 
2013-06-24 02:56:27 PM  

t3knomanser: I think it's eventually both possible and necessary, I'm a "space nutter" according to


That's pretty much the definition of a Space Nutter, amigo. How can you contain the contradiction that you know it's a pipe dream while at the same time evangelizing it?

I mean, never mind the fact that it's simply not possible, how would you choose the people to represent "the species" when you send them off to colonize a deadly, empty rock with nothing on it? (Or too much on it.)

Or the fact that you know that making a slightly better bike helmet makes no sense but you must also believe that some pretty unlikely technologies and energy sources have to happen for your "necessary" thing to happen?

What makes it "necessary" BTW? I think if you answer that honestly you have pretty much the blueprint for a Space Nutter.
 
2013-06-24 10:14:58 PM  
I read an article about Filipino basketball.  They were worried about taller international athletes coming into the league, so they imposed height restrictions.

F=MA

We can't really affect acceleration without making football boring (weighted shoes?) but it would be easy enough to put size restrictions in.  Players have bulked up tremendously in recent decades.  If you put weight restrictions in at some of the positions athletes wouldn't bring so much mass to the collision.  Sure, there is something about watching heavyweight boxers slug it out, but the lighter weight classes are usually much better fights.
 
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