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(Wimp)   Man who received deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson's disease turns his neurostimulator off to show the before and after effects   (wimp.com) divider line 46
    More: Interesting, Parkinson's disease  
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4587 clicks; posted to Video » on 23 Jun 2013 at 7:04 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-23 07:10:41 PM
He sounds British.

How much of our soul should we be prepared to give up for that same procedure here in the USA?
 
2013-06-23 07:20:19 PM

ng2810: He sounds British Australian.

How much of our soul should we be prepared to give up for that same procedure here in the USA?


FTFY.  Honestly, couldn't you tell by the seig heil he was doing?

Anyway.  Yeah, you'd pay several generations of debt for it, but at least you'd be steady enough to whip that credit card out comfortably.
 
2013-06-23 07:24:59 PM

Psychopusher: ng2810: He sounds British Australian.

How much of our soul should we be prepared to give up for that same procedure here in the USA?

FTFY.  Honestly, couldn't you tell by the seig heil he was doing?

Anyway.  Yeah, you'd pay several generations of debt for it, but at least you'd be steady enough to whip that credit card out comfortably.


If I was in his place and facing a life w/o it, I'd be willing to spend almost anything.
 
2013-06-23 07:27:58 PM
holy fark that is farking scary
 
2013-06-23 07:30:52 PM

phlegmmo: Psychopusher: ng2810: He sounds British Australian.

How much of our soul should we be prepared to give up for that same procedure here in the USA?

FTFY.  Honestly, couldn't you tell by the seig heil he was doing?

Anyway.  Yeah, you'd pay several generations of debt for it, but at least you'd be steady enough to whip that credit card out comfortably.

If I was in his place and facing a life w/o it, I'd be willing to spend almost anything.


Tried to do some searches on the average cost and there seems to be some variation.  One site for a place in Michigan says $30,000 plus physician and MRI fees.  Another said $40-50k for unilateral and double that for bi-lateral.  Another site talking about people going to India for care sited the average cost in America as being "1,00,000. ", which I assume meant $100,000.
  In any case, most insurance does cover this procedure.
 
2013-06-23 07:42:31 PM

ng2810: He sounds British.

How much of our soul should we be prepared to give up for that same procedure here in the USA?


Roughly paraphrasing from The Economist, US health care is focused on testing, other countries are focused on making you well.
 
2013-06-23 07:45:48 PM
That was... wow...

I'll take his claim of not faking it at face value, since for a moment there it looked like his facial muscles went slack.  That's not something you can easily do consciously.
 
2013-06-23 07:55:48 PM

Psychopusher: ng2810: He sounds British Australian.


My guess is he's a Kiwi.
 
2013-06-23 07:58:49 PM

Psychopusher: ng2810: He sounds British Australian.


How old is thfity-nine in American English?
 
2013-06-23 08:16:57 PM
There was a radio story on NPR the other day that said that in most parkinson patients tested with a "neuro stimulator" the placebo effect was amazingly prevalent.


Namely, they could simply "tell" the patient that they were turning on the stimulator, and it would have the same effect as actually turning it on.    (the effects lasted on average only 25% as long as actually turning the device on, but was still there).

Some of the words used in the above (like "most", etc...) may be slightly inaccurate... just recounting from a story I heard in passing yesterday.


<citation needed.gif>
 
2013-06-23 08:25:30 PM

edmo: ng2810: He sounds British.

How much of our soul should we be prepared to give up for that same procedure here in the USA?

Roughly paraphrasing from The Economist, US health care is focused on testing, other countries are focused on making you well.


Testing as in R&D type testing or testing as in ordering 30 different bloodworks 15 stool samples, 20 range of motion/football combine graphings, 10 DNA swabs etc over a 3 week period to diagnose a sore throat that cleared up 7 days into testing?
 
2013-06-23 08:36:37 PM

Reyito: There was a radio story on NPR the other day that said that in most parkinson patients tested with a "neuro stimulator" the placebo effect was amazingly prevalent.


Namely, they could simply "tell" the patient that they were turning on the stimulator, and it would have the same effect as actually turning it on.    (the effects lasted on average only 25% as long as actually turning the device on, but was still there).

Some of the words used in the above (like "most", etc...) may be slightly inaccurate... just recounting from a story I heard in passing yesterday.


<citation needed.gif>


You ask for citation, after citing an unidentified NPR broadcast?

At this point, you need to turn on your anti-shill device.
 
2013-06-23 08:42:51 PM
Thing is, it's not always that effective.  An elderly friend had the procedure done and it hasn't much helped. Makes things slightly worse for his wife, unfortunately, with that thingy protruding from his head.  Extra sad, for he's a vastly intelligent man and Parkinson's has just about destroyed his ability to communicate.

For those who had it done and it works, bravo.  I wish them well, and hope for Doug's improvement somehow.
 
2013-06-23 09:19:04 PM
and not all variations of Parkinsons make a person shaky. The other version has a dementia effect that is equally sucky without much in the way of help aside from meds that only help to a certain degree.

My father in law died last year from the non shaky version.

not a csb. he was a good man.
 
2013-06-23 09:27:09 PM
I remember watching something similar with a guy suffering from Stage 4 Tourettes with all of the major tics, who was practically cured with deep brain stimulation.  Turns the machine off in a forest, and he gets all of the cussing and ball punching that comes with his illness.  Turns it back on and he's perfectly normal.

(I thought it was NOVA or something similar on PBS.  Not sure, though.)
 
2013-06-23 09:34:01 PM

Tillmaster: Reyito: There was a radio story on NPR the other day that said that in most parkinson patients tested with a "neuro stimulator" the placebo effect was amazingly prevalent.


Namely, they could simply "tell" the patient that they were turning on the stimulator, and it would have the same effect as actually turning it on.    (the effects lasted on average only 25% as long as actually turning the device on, but was still there).

Some of the words used in the above (like "most", etc...) may be slightly inaccurate... just recounting from a story I heard in passing yesterday.


<citation needed.gif>

You ask for citation, after citing an unidentified NPR broadcast?

At this point, you need to turn on your anti-shill device.



Think you misunderstood.... Wasn't saying citation for the video, but rather that my own post was sketchy on the facts, so take with a grain of salt.
 
2013-06-23 10:11:19 PM
images4.wikia.nocookie.net

Unimpressed.
 
2013-06-23 10:17:25 PM
fake.
 
2013-06-23 10:35:04 PM

lohphat: Psychopusher: ng2810: He sounds British Australian.

My guess is he's a Kiwi.


he's not a farking kiwi!
 
2013-06-23 11:05:15 PM
The video is from http://www.youngandshaky.com which is New Zealand.

Which has national healthcare.

It's sort of like when you pay your taxes, they pave your roads and build schools, but in this case they build hospitals and take care of people. It's crazy I know, but that's what happens.

/Canadian
 
2013-06-23 11:24:40 PM
I've known of two guys that has this same thing done. One did better for quite awhile but has started to get worse again... and the other went sorta crazy, but they sorted that out.
 
2013-06-23 11:32:11 PM
Yeah, he's a Kiwi.

/Kiwi
 
2013-06-23 11:35:02 PM

phlegmmo: Psychopusher: ng2810: He sounds British Australian.

How much of our soul should we be prepared to give up for that same procedure here in the USA?

FTFY.  Honestly, couldn't you tell by the seig heil he was doing?

Anyway.  Yeah, you'd pay several generations of debt for it, but at least you'd be steady enough to whip that credit card out comfortably.

If I was in his place and facing a life w/o it, I'd be willing to spend almost anything.


Exactly, that's the American health system business model. Health insurance when you don't need it, bankruptcy when you do.
 
2013-06-23 11:35:15 PM

mrbach: The video is from http://www.youngandshaky.com which is New Zealand.

Which has national healthcare.

It's sort of like when you pay your taxes, they pave your roads and build schools, but in this case they build hospitals and take care of people. It's crazy I know, but that's what happens.

/Canadian


Functional modern infrastructure is for commies.
 
2013-06-23 11:45:16 PM
I have seen a couple people go through Parkinson's disease and what a son of a biatch it is to completely loose control of your body while maintaining fairly normal cognitive abilities. Wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy!
That was amazing to watch and I will be sharing it, Thanks Subby!
 
2013-06-24 01:11:20 AM
For once... that's accurate. Loose control is actually the case.

Charles.
 
2013-06-24 01:29:07 AM
Fascinating. I had assumed it was the medication that made sufferers shake like that, and that they would be like living corpses without it.

A friend of mine recently told me he has dystonia. I figured he was only making excuses for his weed habit, but thinking back it makes sense.
 
2013-06-24 04:45:42 AM

Jon iz teh kewl: lohphat: Psychopusher: ng2810: He sounds British Australian.

My guess is he's a Kiwi.

he's not a farking kiwi!


Yes he is, numbnuts.

That was an amazing demonstration.
 
2013-06-24 05:03:59 AM

lohphat: mrbach: The video is from http://www.youngandshaky.com which is New Zealand.

Which has national healthcare.

It's sort of like when you pay your taxes, they pave your roads and build schools, but in this case they build hospitals and take care of people. It's crazy I know, but that's what happens.

/Canadian

Functional modern infrastructure is for commies.


//Trix is for kids
 
2013-06-24 08:10:17 AM
I really hope they worked out all the kinks on that device, or we'll soon be seeing "The Terminal Man" go from fiction to reality.
 
2013-06-24 08:49:08 AM

thisiszombocom: holy fark that is farking scary


^^^ That
 
2013-06-24 09:12:17 AM
I laughed at "the right hand...good for shaking cocktails, while the left hand....is more like the royal wave!"
 
2013-06-24 09:35:01 AM
fark thats incredible
 
2013-06-24 09:55:49 AM
So fake.

img.fark.net
 
2013-06-24 10:08:47 AM
I like how he stops shaking 1 second before restarting his electricity.
 
2013-06-24 10:51:40 AM

kvinesknows: I like how he stops shaking 1 second before restarting his electricity.


No. Tremors fluctuate. He waited until it wasn't as bad so he could control his dominant hand.
 
2013-06-24 11:08:23 AM

someonelse: kvinesknows: I like how he stops shaking 1 second before restarting his electricity.

No. Tremors fluctuate. He waited until it wasn't as bad so he could control his dominant hand.


no he never.

watch it.. it says.. well I am going to do this now before I cant.. his hand slooowly. moves up... whole body stops trembling at least 1 second before he hits the button.

Could be a "placebo" type effect where is body is like.. oh goodie..  I can stop now.. or he could be faking.. either way.. tremors stop completely BEFORE he pushes the button
 
2013-06-24 01:56:31 PM
I only know one person who has had the procedure. He was over 50 at the time and had been dealing with Parkinson's for almost a decade. Prior to DBS, he was unable to stand on his own, shook almost constantly and couldn't speak above a whisper. His bed had rails to keep him from falling out. With DBS, he gets around okay. Doesn't shake at all and his speaking voice is much louder.  He hasn't tried driving, but I suspect he could.

I suspect that none of the posters dissing the procedure will ever have something like this happen to them. They'll be hale and hearty forever. Not.
 
2013-06-24 02:29:36 PM

kvinesknows: someonelse: kvinesknows: I like how he stops shaking 1 second before restarting his electricity.

Could be a "placebo" type effect where is body is like.. oh goodie..  I can stop now.. or he could be faking.. either way.. tremors stop completely BEFORE he pushes the button


What you may not be considering is that he's a good public speaker.  He knows which ideas he wants to communicate ahead of time and he's probably even practiced turning it off and giving the talk a few times before he shot it.  In fact we may be seeing the best of several videos he shot.
     As the various symptoms manifested he used that as the opportunity to talk about them.  Unfortunately it makes it all look a little to convenient (fake.)
    in this case his polished speaking skills have worked against him.
 
2013-06-24 02:45:01 PM

natazha: I only know one person who has had the procedure. He was over 50 at the time and had been dealing with Parkinson's for almost a decade. Prior to DBS, he was unable to stand on his own, shook almost constantly and couldn't speak above a whisper. His bed had rails to keep him from falling out. With DBS, he gets around okay. Doesn't shake at all and his speaking voice is much louder.  He hasn't tried driving, but I suspect he could.

I suspect that none of the posters dissing the procedure will ever have something like this happen to them. They'll be hale and hearty forever. Not.


I for one am not dissing the procedure. I am merely pointing out the observable fact, he stops shaking before pressing the button.

\
 
2013-06-24 05:17:41 PM

Reyito: There was a radio story on NPR the other day that said that in most parkinson patients tested with a "neuro stimulator" the placebo effect was amazingly prevalent.


Namely, they could simply "tell" the patient that they were turning on the stimulator, and it would have the same effect as actually turning it on.    (the effects lasted on average only 25% as long as actually turning the device on, but was still there).

Some of the words used in the above (like "most", etc...) may be slightly inaccurate... just recounting from a story I heard in passing yesterday.


<citation needed.gif>


I actually know exactly what NPR program it was because I heard the podcast just a week or two ago. It was Radiolab. Here is a link to the episode:

http://www.radiolab.org/2007/may/17/

Fascinating show. But you missed one crucial detail: when it came to Parkinsons and the neurostimulator, yes, there was a placebo effect, but it was short-lived. If they told the patient that the device was on, and it was not actually on, their symptoms would resolve temporarily, but then they would come back a short time later.
 
2013-06-24 09:35:58 PM
Does that guy ever farking blink?
 
2013-06-24 09:53:36 PM
Pretty incredible and looks real to me.  I'm calling fake.
 
2013-06-24 10:02:55 PM

Kirkenhegelstein: Does that guy ever farking blink?


Whenever he gets the urge he just shakes it off.
 
2013-06-24 11:13:37 PM
When you see it on WIMP, its already everywhere else...
 
2013-06-25 03:10:42 AM

mrbach: The video is from http://www.youngandshaky.com which is New Zealand.

Which has national healthcare.

It's sort of like when you pay your taxes, they pave your roads and build schools, but in this case they build hospitals and take care of people. It's crazy I know, but that's what happens.

/Canadian


im payin to keep someone else healthly?  fark that shiat.  if youre unhealthy, take care of yourself.  if you have a disease like this, you just happen to have lost a lottery.  sucks, and I feel bad, but fark off, i have my own problems.
 
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