If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Huffington Post)   So, this summer, I think we're going to go to the Land of Those Who Speak Normally to catch a Stink Onions Cubs game   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 37
    More: Strange, Atlas of True Names, literal translation, atlas  
•       •       •

3391 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Jun 2013 at 3:43 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-06-21 08:23:44 AM  
having lived in iowa, i'd say "land of the palefaces" is about right.
 
2013-06-21 03:48:02 PM  
When I think of "land of the rebellious one", I definitely think of the land of Marys.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-21 03:51:34 PM  
Town by the Mountain of the Mountains for Atlanta struck me.  I can find no etymology for that.  Most agree that it was pulled out of the air as a feminized version of Atlantic (as was the style at the time) by a railroad executive.
 
2013-06-21 03:52:20 PM  
How do they get Land of the Flowland People from Indiana?
 
2013-06-21 03:52:49 PM  
I was born in the City of the South Wind People. My father came from the Red Peoples' City and my mother hailed from the People of Moderate Weather. In August I am moving to be with the People of the Valley. Mostly for the climate.
 
2013-06-21 03:54:43 PM  
Also, did they really have to translate Philly as "sibling love"?  At least "brotherly love" connotes unity and not incest.
 
2013-06-21 03:56:33 PM  
Walla Walla, Washington is NOT "little swift river." It means "many waters" as the Walla Walla Indians didn't pluralize nouns, they repeated it meaning "more than one."
Unless that's another town near Walla Walla. Then it can be "little swift river."  

/Walla Walla
//Not Adam West!
///or am I?????
 
2013-06-21 03:56:47 PM  
Depending on where you draw the limits of Standard American English, the Land of The People Who Speak Normally is entirely valid. What the fark is wrong with the way the rest of you talk, anyway?
 
2013-06-21 03:59:13 PM  
 
2013-06-21 03:59:59 PM  
ehhh....to be pedantic, "Arizona" is believed to be the anglicized "a'li shonak", which is an indian word meaning "little spring", and the same language is believed to be where "Tucson" comes from, "tchuk-shon", or "dark spring" / "black spring".  the "shonak" and "shon" are supposedly variants of "spring" in an idnian language.
 
2013-06-21 04:00:20 PM  

jaytkay: How do they get Land of the Flowland People from Indiana?


I thought it was a latinized way of saying "Land of the Indians".
 
2013-06-21 04:02:00 PM  

fastbow: They get Des Moines right? The city of the Shiatfaces?

http://www.desmoinesregister.com/article/20030914/ENT/70323017/Is-De s- Moines-just-some-dirty-joke-


Nah, they played it safe and called it "of the monks."

They also gave the name "The Lovely One" to a city that no one has EVER called lovely.
 
2013-06-21 04:03:00 PM  
H-Town, Big D, The Big Apple, City of Brotherly Love. The Motor City
 
2013-06-21 04:03:55 PM  

jaytkay: How do they get Land of the Flowland People from Indiana?


Indiana is essentially derived from "India", which historically refered to the peoples near/beyond the Indus river. With the name "Indus" being derived from the Sanskrit word generally meaning river.
 
2013-06-21 04:04:25 PM  
I was greatly disapoint with Colorado.
 
2013-06-21 04:04:39 PM  
The mid-Atlantic comes across pretty badass with Land of the Way, New Isle of Spears, and Land of the Rebellious One.
 
2013-06-21 04:05:22 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: The mid-Atlantic comes across pretty badass with Land of the War, New Isle of Spears, and Land of the Rebellious One.


FTFM
 
2013-06-21 04:05:57 PM  
Approves:

img.fark.net
 
2013-06-21 04:06:47 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: TuteTibiImperes: The mid-Atlantic comes across pretty badass with Land of the War, New Isle of Spears, and Land of the Rebellious One.

FTFM


Much more badass than the land of virgins.
 
2013-06-21 04:07:15 PM  

studleystudstutterson: jaytkay: How do they get Land of the Flowland People from Indiana?

Indiana is essentially derived from "India", which historically refered to the peoples near/beyond the Indus river. With the name "Indus" being derived from the Sanskrit word generally meaning river.


Are you a wizard?

Interesting, thanks.
 
2013-06-21 04:09:15 PM  

ariseatex: Much more badass than the land of virgins Totalfarkers



huh?
 
2013-06-21 04:10:08 PM  

fickenchucker: Approves:

[img.fark.net image 248x198]


I'm soooo happy I scrolled through the thread first.  Well done.  I hope you like blue 3
 
2013-06-21 04:16:18 PM  

blatz514: fickenchucker: Approves:

[img.fark.net image 248x198]

I'm soooo happy I scrolled through the thread first.  Well done.  I hope you like blue 3



--Good Land fist bump--
 
2013-06-21 04:17:36 PM  
St. Heelholder:

img.fark.net

Also known as:  A whale's Vagina
 
2013-06-21 04:34:35 PM  
I live in the ranch of the little rocky cliffs, a neighborhood northeast of St. Heelholder.  I love going to the beach and then having a nice fancy dinner in swampy lowlands.  Some people say swampy lowlands is really named after sparkly gemstones, but the locals know differently.
 
2013-06-21 04:55:01 PM  

SearchN: I was greatly disapoint with Colorado.


I have been for years.

//lude
 
2013-06-21 05:07:54 PM  
Some Canadian Provinces:

New Found Land = New Found Land.  Oh, you're no fun any more!

Nova Scotia = New Scotland = New Burnt Land (to scotch, to scorch, to burn, to brown as in Butterscotch)

New Brunswick = Black Bear Country. Bruns comes from a cognate of brown or black (brun) or bears (bruins), or split the difference and call it Place of the Brown/Black Bears. Brantgoose means Burnt Goose because it comes from the same Indo-European root (b-r-n) Can also mean Bruno's village. Wyck is from the Latin Vicus, a district, region, ward, neighbourhood. Vicinity is from the same root. Bruno is derived from bear, IIRC.

Prince Edward Island = Island of Prince Prosperity Guard
Old English Eadweard, literally "prosperity-guard," from ead "wealth, prosperity" + weard

Quebec = Place of the Narrows.
The Indian villagers that occupied the site of Quebec city for a couple of thousand years before Jacques Cartier's first visit (1535) would have called their village this because Quebec is the place where the river narrows noticeably.

Ontario = Great Big Sea
Named after the lake, which is named after the Ontario tribe, which is named after the lake. It means "Great Lake or Beautiful Lake". Strictlyl, the english word sea can be used of non-salt water bodies and also of marshes, as can the French word "mer". Near Ottawa we have a Mer Bleue, which is a marsh.

Manitoba = Land of Manitou, the Great Spirit

Saskatchewan = Swift River

Alberta = All Bright
Female form of Albert, which means noble, bright and has the same etymological origin as the family name Albright

British Columbia = Land of the Dove of Britain

Canadian place names aren't nearly as fanciful or imaginative as American place names.

Of course, we didn't kill all the Indians before we could ask them for place names. Just kidding. Neither did you.

One of the funny things about some New Brunswick place names is that they are Native American place names, but the native that the railroad asked to name them was a Deleware India from about a thousand miles South of New Brunswick (Canada).

So if you ask an Indian what the place name means and he shakes his head, he may simply not have a clue. Nobody in New Brunswick speaks Delaware in all probability.
 
2013-06-21 05:32:45 PM  
Awe, I live in the land of friends. Too bad that I'm a misanthrope.
 
2013-06-21 05:55:47 PM  

Bonzo_1116: I live in the ranch of the little rocky cliffs, a neighborhood northeast of St. Heelholder.  I love going to the beach and then having a nice fancy dinner in swampy lowlands.  Some people say swampy lowlands is really named after sparkly gemstones, but the locals know differently.


Greetings from Where The Sun Breaks Through The Mist, "neighbor".
 
2013-06-21 06:31:03 PM  

VogonPoet: Bonzo_1116: I live in the ranch of the little rocky cliffs, a neighborhood northeast of St. Heelholder.  I love going to the beach and then having a nice fancy dinner in swampy lowlands.  Some people say swampy lowlands is really named after sparkly gemstones, but the locals know differently.

Greetings from Where The Sun Breaks Through The Mist, "neighbor".


Leucadia?
 
2013-06-21 06:39:08 PM  
I read Alabama as "Land of the thicker creatures". I guess that's somewhat accurate.
 
2013-06-21 07:45:41 PM  
boy, i thought the system didnt allow the same EXACT link to be submitted. i guess that changed
 
2013-06-21 08:59:05 PM  
Reddish Land....

Yeah....*looks out my window* Not seeing it... I see asphalt instead.
 
2013-06-21 09:38:42 PM  

Bonzo_1116: VogonPoet: Bonzo_1116: I live in the ranch of the little rocky cliffs, a neighborhood northeast of St. Heelholder.  I love going to the beach and then having a nice fancy dinner in swampy lowlands.  Some people say swampy lowlands is really named after sparkly gemstones, but the locals know differently.

Greetings from Where The Sun Breaks Through The Mist, "neighbor".

Leucadia?


Temecula
 
2013-06-21 09:47:45 PM  
The biggest city in "The Land of Folks" translates as... "Portland". That's some fine etymoligizin' there, Lou!

Also, visit Tristan da Cunha:
img.fark.net

"Where's your house?"
"It's halfway between Down-where-the-Minister-land-his-things and East Jew's Point."
 
2013-06-21 09:49:33 PM  

VogonPoet: Bonzo_1116: VogonPoet: Bonzo_1116: I live in the ranch of the little rocky cliffs, a neighborhood northeast of St. Heelholder.  I love going to the beach and then having a nice fancy dinner in swampy lowlands.  Some people say swampy lowlands is really named after sparkly gemstones, but the locals know differently.

Greetings from Where The Sun Breaks Through The Mist, "neighbor".

Leucadia?

Temecula


LOL. So that's what it means!  I always thought it was some kind of skin disease.

"I'd go out this Saturday, but my Temecula is flaring up."
 
2013-06-22 02:23:13 PM  
Continue on north of the place of rotting stinking onions and stop at the "Little Fort" of Waukegan.
 
Displayed 37 of 37 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report