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(Epicurious)   Fark Food Thread: Grilling. Direct or indirect heat, dry rub or slathered in sauce, smoked with wood chips, soaked cedar planks, whatever: it is time to revisit a FoodThreadFavorite. Break out those recipes.. or just snark about the 'right way'   (epicurious.com) divider line 205
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1332 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jun 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-20 02:56:07 PM
skin-on bone-in chicken pieces.  Start on hot side or cool side?  HALP!?
 
2013-06-20 02:56:12 PM
I got baby back ribs marinating at home right now. They'll be slow baked here starting in about an hour soon as I can bail out of work and remote in from home.
 
2013-06-20 02:58:17 PM
When I BBQ grill a steak I just use a little S&P
 
2013-06-20 03:00:08 PM

moogrum: Start on hot side or cool side? HALP!?


I would start skin-side down on the hot side, and then flip it to indirect heat once the skin has nice color and texture.
 
2013-06-20 03:01:10 PM
That is a pretty wide topic range subby, ya may want to get a bit more specific.

moogrum: skin-on bone-in chicken pieces.  Start on hot side or cool side?  HALP!?


I'd start hot side then move them to the cold side when I was happy with the color.  Assuming you are just grilling and not trying to smoke them or anything anyways.
 
2013-06-20 03:07:56 PM
Dude, you just asked a huge heap of questions.  The answer to all of them is, "depends on the situation."  I hope that helps.
 
2013-06-20 03:08:23 PM

PolloDiablo: moogrum: Start on hot side or cool side? HALP!?

I would start skin-side down on the hot side, and then flip it to indirect heat once the skin has nice color and texture.


How do you avoid the skin sticking on the hot side?
 
2013-06-20 03:09:22 PM
Beef Spare Ribs:

Kind of a biatch to find (at least unmutilated) but worth it.  Ask your butcher.

Remove the silver skin from the back.  Rub them with Montreal Seasoning and paprika.  Mix 1/3 apple cider vinigar, 1/3 water and 1/6 worchestor + 1/6 soy sauce in a spray bottle.

Smoke over cherry wood smoke around 220 for 3-4 hours.  Every hour or so rotate em around just right and spray them down with your mop.
Stick in the oven at 190 for a few hours until just almost perfect (cover them, they will get goopy looking, thats fine)
Grill them off for a few moments on low until they tighten up.  Eat!
 
2013-06-20 03:09:32 PM
Chicken, pulled pork starts out vacuum tumbled with marinade. Then pressure smoked.
Steaks souis vide, then seared on high heat.
Turkeys are fried.
Ducks are smoked.
Pork chops, both smoked and souis vide. Depends on what I feel like.
Elk -depending on the cut, just grilled or pressure smoked then put into a stew
Rabbit - slow cooked in stew.
Cut up chicken -vacuum tumbled with whatever marinade I want and grilled.
Buffalo. Ground up and made into burgers.
Chicken legs rather than wings due to cost. Vacuum tumbled with a mild hot sauce for a marinade and tossed into the turkey fryer.

As I write this on my back patio looking at a commercial smoker, turkey fryer, pressure smoker, rotisserie, and portable ice machine. My green egg got smashed in a storm and has yet to be replaced. I got a pizza oven instead for this year.
 
2013-06-20 03:10:20 PM

moogrum: PolloDiablo: moogrum: Start on hot side or cool side? HALP!?

I would start skin-side down on the hot side, and then flip it to indirect heat once the skin has nice color and texture.

How do you avoid the skin sticking on the hot side?


clean your grates and have a thin layer of oil on them

//making beef ribs this weekend so that one came to mind.....
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 03:13:26 PM

exvaxman: Chicken, pulled pork starts out vacuum tumbled with marinade. Then pressure smoked.
Steaks souis vide, then seared on high heat.
Turkeys are fried.
Ducks are smoked.
Pork chops, both smoked and souis vide. Depends on what I feel like.
Elk -depending on the cut, just grilled or pressure smoked then put into a stew
Rabbit - slow cooked in stew.
Cut up chicken -vacuum tumbled with whatever marinade I want and grilled.
Buffalo. Ground up and made into burgers.
Chicken legs rather than wings due to cost. Vacuum tumbled with a mild hot sauce for a marinade and tossed into the turkey fryer.

As I write this on my back patio looking at a commercial smoker, turkey fryer, pressure smoker, rotisserie, and portable ice machine. My green egg got smashed in a storm and has yet to be replaced. I got a pizza oven instead for this year.


I still haven't done a turkey fried, I hear good things. I don't have the space or equipment to give it a go, but maybe someday.

My father used to smoke a turkey out on the grill.. someday I'll give that a shot, too. It's been forever since I had a grill. Inner city living has its cons, that's for certain, if you don't have a concrete balcony or back yard.

As for steak sous vide, then seared, grill is great for that, but unless you rig up a cooler to do sous vide, the equipment is not exactly cheap for home use. :/

I think what I miss most without a grill would be doing sausages. In a pan just isn't the same as grilling. Though I'd love to get a good smoker and do up ribs, those also aren't nearly the same done inside as when grilled/smoked.
 
2013-06-20 03:14:16 PM

If you are ever in the Appleton, wi area, check out these folks for all kinds of jerky meats and smoking supplies



Link
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 03:14:35 PM

NickelP: moogrum: PolloDiablo: moogrum: Start on hot side or cool side? HALP!?

I would start skin-side down on the hot side, and then flip it to indirect heat once the skin has nice color and texture.

How do you avoid the skin sticking on the hot side?

clean your grates and have a thin layer of oil on them

//making beef ribs this weekend so that one came to mind.....



Do you use a particular oil (keeping smoke point in mind) or just throw whatever on there? I wonder about that, as compared to stovetop cooking with oils.
 
2013-06-20 03:15:33 PM
Oh man Sunday I grilled some fresh brook trout I caught. Just brushed them with sesame oil and a little bit of salt. 11 fish gone and I only got 2 small tester bites. It dont get much better than that!
 
2013-06-20 03:20:25 PM
While I have a "real" souis vide, they can be made cheaply.
My "outside" unit is a butterball turkey fryer ($50) and a dork food controller ($90?).
I have a commercial vacuum sealer, but got along for years with a goodwill bought food saver that was under  $5. You can do cheaper still with kits, but with the built dork food controller and butterball unit, there was no building/experimenting. It matches my commercial unit.
 
2013-06-20 03:20:45 PM

DGS: NickelP: moogrum: PolloDiablo: moogrum: Start on hot side or cool side? HALP!?

I would start skin-side down on the hot side, and then flip it to indirect heat once the skin has nice color and texture.

How do you avoid the skin sticking on the hot side?

clean your grates and have a thin layer of oil on them

//making beef ribs this weekend so that one came to mind.....


Do you use a particular oil (keeping smoke point in mind) or just throw whatever on there? I wonder about that, as compared to stovetop cooking with oils.


use whatever you want.  For something like that I'd just use pam since it is conveniently packaged.  Smoke point is important when you are frying, if you are just using it to keep shiat from sticking the small amount that will burn really doesn't matter.  Oil matters too for different flavors sometimes but not for something like this.

I scrub mine with one of those grill scrubber things then wipe it down with a paper towel.  Toss that towel and spray oil all over a new one or the grate and wipe it again with the towel between the scrubber and the grate.  If things are sticking it just means the grate isn't clean enough or is shiatty/pitted.
 
2013-06-20 03:24:59 PM
For an inexpensive smoker, check out the "good eats" episode where Alton Brown makes one with a small calrod (electric) burner and a large clay pot. One farmer posted pictures of his some time ago. For smaller items like fish and salts, I use a Cameron smoker. Except when large batches of salt are asked for and I use the "real" smoker.
 
2013-06-20 03:25:42 PM
The right way: whatever tastes good to you and the people you're cooking for.  I get amused by how up in arms people get about grilling/bbq/smoking/etc.

That said, I love my new Kamado smoker/grill.  Only had it a few weeks, but so far I've made chicken:
farm3.staticflickr.com

Chicken pieces:
farm4.staticflickr.com

Pork butt:
farm8.staticflickr.com
l6.yimg.com
farm6.staticflickr.com
(no, that's not Kraft mac&cheese)

and babyback ribs:
farm4.staticflickr.com

I am in love with this thing.  Amazing results with very little effort, once you figure out how to manage the temperatures.  The pork butt cooked for ~14 hours at 235, and the meat was so tender that I was easily able to grab the bone, twist it, and pull it right out.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 03:26:44 PM

exvaxman: For an inexpensive smoker, check out the "good eats" episode where Alton Brown makes one with a small calrod (electric) burner and a large clay pot. One farmer posted pictures of his some time ago. For smaller items like fish and salts, I use a Cameron smoker. Except when large batches of salt are asked for and I use the "real" smoker.


I have one of his books, specifically about 'what to cook with' as opposed to recipes, and he does mention the clay pot cooking as the way he likes to roast chickens. It's tempting to do something different like that. At least, when I have a place to put the clay pot. The idea of doing that indoors just doesn't seem brilliant.
 
2013-06-20 03:27:29 PM

DGS: exvaxman: Chicken, pulled pork starts out vacuum tumbled with marinade. Then pressure smoked.
Steaks souis vide, then seared on high heat.
Turkeys are fried.
Ducks are smoked.
Pork chops, both smoked and souis vide. Depends on what I feel like.
Elk -depending on the cut, just grilled or pressure smoked then put into a stew
Rabbit - slow cooked in stew.
Cut up chicken -vacuum tumbled with whatever marinade I want and grilled.
Buffalo. Ground up and made into burgers.
Chicken legs rather than wings due to cost. Vacuum tumbled with a mild hot sauce for a marinade and tossed into the turkey fryer.

As I write this on my back patio looking at a commercial smoker, turkey fryer, pressure smoker, rotisserie, and portable ice machine. My green egg got smashed in a storm and has yet to be replaced. I got a pizza oven instead for this year.

I still haven't done a turkey fried, I hear good things. I don't have the space or equipment to give it a go, but maybe someday.

My father used to smoke a turkey out on the grill.. someday I'll give that a shot, too. It's been forever since I had a grill. Inner city living has its cons, that's for certain, if you don't have a concrete balcony or back yard.

As for steak sous vide, then seared, grill is great for that, but unless you rig up a cooler to do sous vide, the equipment is not exactly cheap for home use. :/


Pff, sure it is. You just need to be handy with an iron. I made two of these.

Also, exvaxman, you'll get a kick out of this... My next project will be one of these smokers. :)
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 03:28:07 PM

ahab: The right way: whatever tastes good to you and the people you're cooking for.  I get amused by how up in arms people get about grilling/bbq/smoking/etc.

That said, I love my new Kamado smoker/grill.  Only had it a few weeks, but so far I've made chicken:
[farm3.staticflickr.com image 640x427]

Chicken pieces:
[farm4.staticflickr.com image 640x427]

Pork butt:
[farm8.staticflickr.com image 640x427]
[l6.yimg.com image 640x427]
[farm6.staticflickr.com image 640x427]
(no, that's not Kraft mac&cheese)

and babyback ribs:
[farm4.staticflickr.com image 640x480]

I am in love with this thing.  Amazing results with very little effort, once you figure out how to manage the temperatures.  The pork butt cooked for ~14 hours at 235, and the meat was so tender that I was easily able to grab the bone, twist it, and pull it right out.


Damn that looks good. Yeah, I want to get a vertical roasting rack. I have no small amount of envy for that new grill of yours. :D
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 03:29:24 PM

Theaetetus: Pff, sure it is. You just need to be handy with an iron. I made two of these.

Also, exvaxman, you'll get a kick out of this... My next project will be one of these smokers. :)


Oooh, will take a look at those. Seems interesting at a glance, but running out of time at the office. Thanks for the tips.
 
2013-06-20 03:29:47 PM

DGS: Damn that looks good. Yeah, I want to get a vertical roasting rack. I have no small amount of envy for that new grill of yours. :D


If you have a turkey roasting rack, just flip it upside down.  Tada!
 
2013-06-20 03:30:12 PM

ahab: The right way: whatever tastes good to you and the people you're cooking for.  I get amused by how up in arms people get about grilling/bbq/smoking/etc.

That said, I love my new Kamado smoker/grill.  Only had it a few weeks, but so far I've made chicken:
[farm3.staticflickr.com image 640x427]

Chicken pieces:
[farm4.staticflickr.com image 640x427]

Pork butt:
[farm8.staticflickr.com image 640x427]
[l6.yimg.com image 640x427]
[farm6.staticflickr.com image 640x427]
(no, that's not Kraft mac&cheese)

and babyback ribs:
[farm4.staticflickr.com image 640x480]

I am in love with this thing.  Amazing results with very little effort, once you figure out how to manage the temperatures.  The pork butt cooked for ~14 hours at 235, and the meat was so tender that I was easily able to grab the bone, twist it, and pull it right out.


Yum.  I don't have a recipe (lots of them are great) but i figured out finally to make my own damn cole slaw.  I like the ones with poppy seeds in them.  I highly recommend doing that to anyone who takes the time to spend all day on a pork butt.  The difference is amazing.  It takes about 10 minutes (do it a day ahead of time though) and a google search of cole slaw recipes will get you thousands to choose from.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 03:32:20 PM

ahab: DGS: Damn that looks good. Yeah, I want to get a vertical roasting rack. I have no small amount of envy for that new grill of yours. :D

If you have a turkey roasting rack, just flip it upside down.  Tada!


Alas, nope, but I'll definitely keep that in mind. Family likes the roast chickens/turkeys I do in the oven, but I know I have a lot of room to grow when it comes to cooking those, so I'll take all the tips I can get.
 
2013-06-20 03:34:33 PM

Theaetetus: DGS: exvaxman: Chicken, pulled pork starts out vacuum tumbled with marinade. Then pressure smoked.
Steaks souis vide, then seared on high heat.
Turkeys are fried.
Ducks are smoked.
Pork chops, both smoked and souis vide. Depends on what I feel like.
Elk -depending on the cut, just grilled or pressure smoked then put into a stew
Rabbit - slow cooked in stew.
Cut up chicken -vacuum tumbled with whatever marinade I want and grilled.
Buffalo. Ground up and made into burgers.
Chicken legs rather than wings due to cost. Vacuum tumbled with a mild hot sauce for a marinade and tossed into the turkey fryer.

As I write this on my back patio looking at a commercial smoker, turkey fryer, pressure smoker, rotisserie, and portable ice machine. My green egg got smashed in a storm and has yet to be replaced. I got a pizza oven instead for this year.

I still haven't done a turkey fried, I hear good things. I don't have the space or equipment to give it a go, but maybe someday.

My father used to smoke a turkey out on the grill.. someday I'll give that a shot, too. It's been forever since I had a grill. Inner city living has its cons, that's for certain, if you don't have a concrete balcony or back yard.

As for steak sous vide, then seared, grill is great for that, but unless you rig up a cooler to do sous vide, the equipment is not exactly cheap for home use. :/

Pff, sure it is. You just need to be handy with an iron. I made two of these.

Also, exvaxman, you'll get a kick out of this... My next project will be one of these smokers. :)


I really want a sous vide, i'm going to have to take a shot at that.  You can buy electric smokers for < $200 pretty easy.  I don't see the appeal of those things.
 
2013-06-20 03:35:40 PM
What are those wolverine claws. I don't like this.
 
2013-06-20 03:37:17 PM

DGS: ahab: DGS: Damn that looks good. Yeah, I want to get a vertical roasting rack. I have no small amount of envy for that new grill of yours. :D

If you have a turkey roasting rack, just flip it upside down.  Tada!

Alas, nope, but I'll definitely keep that in mind. Family likes the roast chickens/turkeys I do in the oven, but I know I have a lot of room to grow when it comes to cooking those, so I'll take all the tips I can get.


Rub the spices under the skin.  I can't wait to do a turkey on this thing, just need to have enough time to do it!

NickelP: Yum.  I don't have a recipe (lots of them are great) but i figured out finally to make my own damn cole slaw.  I like the ones with poppy seeds in them.  I highly recommend doing that to anyone who takes the time to spend all day on a pork butt.  The difference is amazing.  It takes about 10 minutes (do it a day ahead of time though) and a google search of cole slaw recipes will get you thousands to choose from.


I cheated on the cole slaw, I won't lie.  Bought a bag of shredded cabbage and a bottle of dressing.  Most of the cooking time for the butt was overnight, and I was wrangling kids and cleaning the house for the in-laws to come over to enjoy the pulled pork.
 
2013-06-20 03:37:33 PM

DGS: Do you use a particular oil (keeping smoke point in mind) or just throw whatever on there? I wonder about that, as compared to stovetop cooking with oils.


Canola is good for grilling, as it has a really high smoke point, but I honestly just use whatever I have laying around (which is more often than not just plain old vegetable)
 
2013-06-20 03:37:52 PM

rappy: What are those wolverine claws. I don't like this.


Wolf claws!  They're amazing for shredding pork/chicken/whatever.
 
2013-06-20 03:39:26 PM
Step 1. Throw out your grill, especially if it's propane
Step 2. Cook whatever you would have grilled an iron skillet on a range and oven
 
2013-06-20 03:41:11 PM

aerojockey: Step 1. Throw out your grill, especially if it's propane
Step 2. Cook whatever you would have grilled an iron skillet on a range and oven


Step 3.  Wonder where the delicious smoke flavor went.
 
2013-06-20 03:42:22 PM
http://www.traegergrills.com/

I'm going to give them a shout out too.  If you are grill shopping take a look. They use wood pellets for fuel (available in all different kinds) and cycle on and off to create smoke.   They aren't perfect for everything but you can make some amazing things on them.  Even burgers taste amazingly better.  They tend to dry out things you smoke more than maybe 6 hours (they have a convection element to them) but overall a very amazing grill.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 03:42:53 PM

PolloDiablo: DGS: Do you use a particular oil (keeping smoke point in mind) or just throw whatever on there? I wonder about that, as compared to stovetop cooking with oils.

Canola is good for grilling, as it has a really high smoke point, but I honestly just use whatever I have laying around (which is more often than not just plain old vegetable)


I use canola inside, and have used it outside. I wondered if that was common or if folks really had a preference for things like grapeseed oils, etc.


aerojockey: Step 1. Throw out your grill, especially if it's propane
Step 2. Cook whatever you would have grilled an iron skillet on a range and oven


I love doing steak on the skillet and finishing in the oven, but I still think you can't do a better sausage than on a grill.
 
2013-06-20 03:42:57 PM
oh damn and we are green
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 03:44:30 PM

NickelP: oh damn and we are green


It's the weekly Thursday food thread. Of course it did.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 03:45:24 PM

NickelP: http://www.traegergrills.com/

I'm going to give them a shout out too.  If you are grill shopping take a look. They use wood pellets for fuel (available in all different kinds) and cycle on and off to create smoke.   They aren't perfect for everything but you can make some amazing things on them.  Even burgers taste amazingly better.  They tend to dry out things you smoke more than maybe 6 hours (they have a convection element to them) but overall a very amazing grill.


Oh man, I am both glad and sad that I clicked that link. Want. And that's the problem. :/
 
2013-06-20 03:47:35 PM

NickelP: http://www.traegergrills.com/

I'm going to give them a shout out too.  If you are grill shopping take a look. They use wood pellets for fuel (available in all different kinds) and cycle on and off to create smoke.   They aren't perfect for everything but you can make some amazing things on them.  Even burgers taste amazingly better.  They tend to dry out things you smoke more than maybe 6 hours (they have a convection element to them) but overall a very amazing grill.


The main problems I have with them are:
1. They can't get hot enough to sear anything.
2. Too many moving parts that could break.

That said, I've had some delicious food made on them (my dad has one).  I love my char-griller akorn though, nice and cheap and simple.
 
2013-06-20 03:54:44 PM
ahab: NickelP: http://www.traegergrills.com/

I'm going to give them a shout out too.  If you are grill shopping take a look. They use wood pellets for fuel (available in all different kinds) and cycle on and off to create smoke.   They aren't perfect for everything but you can make some amazing things on them.  Even burgers taste amazingly better.  They tend to dry out things you smoke more than maybe 6 hours (they have a convection element to them) but overall a very amazing grill.

The main problems I have with them are:
1. They can't get hot enough to sear anything.
I usually smoke my steaks and stuff on it and then sear them off on another grill after they hit around 110-120 degrees.  Mine tends to max out at like 500 degrees.  I added a thermal blanket to it and that seems to help a bit, but I agree with this. For chicken it seems to do fine.  The issues are mainly beef where I want to sear it off without raising the temp too much.  Smoke steaks seared off around 700-750 on a gas grill are amazing btw.

2. Too many moving parts that could break.

That said, I've had some delicious food made on them (my dad has one).  I love my char-griller akorn though, nice and cheap and simple.



Its not great for everything.  I really want to grab a nice off set smoker.  I've used a lot of different grills and smokers and it does a pretty decent job of combining the best elements of several of the others.  That said, for long smokes its lacking and you are dead on that it will not get as hot as a charcoal or nice gas grill.
 
2013-06-20 03:55:48 PM

NickelP: You can buy electric smokers for < $200 pretty easy.  I don't see the appeal of those things.


Using a PID controller, I'll be able to (i) hold temp within half a degree for days, if necessary; and (ii) run a low/high temp alarm extension so that I can leave the smoker sitting on my rooftop deck for days while I'm downstairs in the apartment.
Heck, I can even wire it through a USB GPIO into my computer, and have it post tweets like "Your butt is so hot, it's at 145 degrees Fahrenheit."
 
2013-06-20 04:05:32 PM

Theaetetus: NickelP: You can buy electric smokers for < $200 pretty easy.  I don't see the appeal of those things.

Using a PID controller, I'll be able to (i) hold temp within half a degree for days, if necessary; and (ii) run a low/high temp alarm extension so that I can leave the smoker sitting on my rooftop deck for days while I'm downstairs in the apartment.
Heck, I can even wire it through a USB GPIO into my computer, and have it post tweets like "Your butt is so hot, it's at 145 degrees Fahrenheit."


I get what you are saying, I just don't care about most of that.  An electric smoker should hold pretty close to that for days too (not that I'd let it sit that long without tending to it though).  It would take me at least a half a day to figure that out and source all those parts.  I'd rather spend an extra $50 and just go grab one from out door world or wherever.  Maybe I am off but I have a feeling those pot smokers are going to have problems in the rain too.
 
2013-06-20 04:06:04 PM

NickelP: I usually smoke my steaks and stuff on it and then sear them off on another grill after they hit around 110-120 degrees.  Mine tends to max out at like 500 degrees.  I added a thermal blanket to it and that seems to help a bit, but I agree with this. For chicken it seems to do fine.  The issues are mainly beef where I want to sear it off without raising the temp too much.  Smoke steaks seared off around 700-750 on a gas grill are amazing btw.


Agreed.  Part of my criteria when I was looking to get something new was that I didn't want to have multiple things, just one that could do just about anything.  My kamado can get hot enough to do pizzas and sear beef without a problem, and can also maintain 225-235 for a LONG time on one load of lump and wood chunks.  Longest I've done is 14 hours, and it didn't even use half the fuel I put in there.

NickelP: Its not great for everything.  I really want to grab a nice off set smoker.  I've used a lot of different grills and smokers and it does a pretty decent job of combining the best elements of several of the others.  That said, for long smokes its lacking and you are dead on that it will not get as hot as a charcoal or nice gas grill.


I didn't realize it dried things out for long smokes, but it makes sense now that I think about it.  Yet another reason to love my kamado. :)
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-20 04:08:20 PM

Theaetetus: NickelP: You can buy electric smokers for < $200 pretty easy.  I don't see the appeal of those things.

Heck, I can even wire it through a USB GPIO into my computer, and have it post tweets like "Your butt is so hot, it's at 145 degrees Fahrenheit."


Ok, I laughed
 
2013-06-20 04:09:46 PM

DGS: Theaetetus: NickelP: You can buy electric smokers for < $200 pretty easy.  I don't see the appeal of those things.

Heck, I can even wire it through a USB GPIO into my computer, and have it post tweets like "Your butt is so hot, it's at 145 degrees Fahrenheit."

Ok, I laughed


I might have had a little bit too much fun talking about my butt the first time I made it.  "My in-laws are eating my butt!  Look at my glorious moist butt!"  etc.
 
2013-06-20 04:21:58 PM

ahab: NickelP: I usually smoke my steaks and stuff on it and then sear them off on another grill after they hit around 110-120 degrees.  Mine tends to max out at like 500 degrees.  I added a thermal blanket to it and that seems to help a bit, but I agree with this. For chicken it seems to do fine.  The issues are mainly beef where I want to sear it off without raising the temp too much.  Smoke steaks seared off around 700-750 on a gas grill are amazing btw.

Agreed.  Part of my criteria when I was looking to get something new was that I didn't want to have multiple things, just one that could do just about anything.  My kamado can get hot enough to do pizzas and sear beef without a problem, and can also maintain 225-235 for a LONG time on one load of lump and wood chunks.  Longest I've done is 14 hours, and it didn't even use half the fuel I put in there.

NickelP: Its not great for everything.  I really want to grab a nice off set smoker.  I've used a lot of different grills and smokers and it does a pretty decent job of combining the best elements of several of the others.  That said, for long smokes its lacking and you are dead on that it will not get as hot as a charcoal or nice gas grill.

I didn't realize it dried things out for long smokes, but it makes sense now that I think about it.  Yet another reason to love my kamado. :)


Have you ever used a big green egg?  Is there a difference between that and a kamado?  My dad has one of those and I'd love one but pricier than all fark, the kamado's seem identical when I've looked at them though.  My yard looks like a grill orgy I've long gotten over the multiple grills thing lol.  I may be too critical on the drying out thing.  For something like a pork butt I'd probably not worry about it.  Something like ribs i'm pulling them off after they have a few hours of smoke.  I'd do this on a normal smoker too though.
 
2013-06-20 04:23:39 PM

NickelP: Have you ever used a big green egg?  Is there a difference between that and a kamado?  My dad has one of those and I'd love one but pricier than all fark, the kamado's seem identical when I've looked at them though.  My yard looks like a grill orgy I've long gotten over the multiple grills thing lol.  I may be too critical on the drying out thing.  For something like a pork butt I'd probably not worry about it.  Something like ribs i'm pulling them off after they have a few hours of smoke.  I'd do this on a normal smoker too though


The BGE is a kamado-style grill.  The one I got is very similar, except about 1/3 the price and insulated steel instead of ceramic.  The babybacks I did last weekend stayed on there for about 5 hours, and were super juicy when we ate them.  If you have a good rub, it'll form a nice bark and not let much moisture out.
 
2013-06-20 04:29:22 PM

ahab: NickelP: Have you ever used a big green egg?  Is there a difference between that and a kamado?  My dad has one of those and I'd love one but pricier than all fark, the kamado's seem identical when I've looked at them though.  My yard looks like a grill orgy I've long gotten over the multiple grills thing lol.  I may be too critical on the drying out thing.  For something like a pork butt I'd probably not worry about it.  Something like ribs i'm pulling them off after they have a few hours of smoke.  I'd do this on a normal smoker too though

The BGE is a kamado-style grill.  The one I got is very similar, except about 1/3 the price and insulated steel instead of ceramic.  The babybacks I did last weekend stayed on there for about 5 hours, and were super juicy when we ate them.  If you have a good rub, it'll form a nice bark and not let much moisture out.


I cook my ribs a bit longer than most people (just a personal preference) too.  I ilke them when they are just almost to the point where they are hard to pickup without them falling off the bone.  This could have something to do with it.

Still you should try grabbing a slab off and covering it in the oven at the same temp after maybe 3 hours of smoke and see if you can tell a difference.  I think I can.  return it to the kamado for the last hour or so to tighten up or it wont' be right.
 
2013-06-20 04:36:38 PM

NickelP: I cook my ribs a bit longer than most people (just a personal preference) too.  I ilke them when they are just almost to the point where they are hard to pickup without them falling off the bone.  This could have something to do with it.


Since you seem to like gadgets, do you have a pressure cooker?  I made some ridiculously amazing ribs in my pressure cooker a few weeks ago.  Definitely falling off the bone (two or three of them lost their bones while I was saucing them under the broiler) and way faster than any other method.
 
2013-06-20 04:37:18 PM
The key to grillin' and all cooking...PAY FARKING ATTENTION. Most grill fails are due to overcooking due to inattention. You don't need to turn the meat into charcoal in order for it to be 'done'. Also, use farking tongs. Stabbing the meat while it is still on the grill will just allow the juices to run out and dry out the meat. And when done, let the meat rest.

dry rub >>>>>>> hfcs-sauce slathering.
 
2013-06-20 04:40:07 PM

Ow! That was my feelings!: The key to grillin' and all cooking...PAY FARKING ATTENTION. Most grill fails are due to overcooking due to inattention. You don't need to turn the meat into charcoal in order for it to be 'done'. Also, use farking tongs. Stabbing the meat while it is still on the grill will just allow the juices to run out and dry out the meat. And when done, let the meat rest.

dry rub >>>>>>> hfcs-sauce slathering.


Dry rub for the cook, sauce for serving (or for ribs, I like to sauce them just a few minutes before taking them off the grill).  But make your own sauce, it's easy and way better than anything from a jar.  Start with this recipe.
 
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