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(Slate)   Kryptonite for the Supermoon   (slate.com) divider line 10
    More: Stupid, Supermoon, lunar orbit, Moon orbit, astronomy, orbits, moons, small telescopes  
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2955 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Jun 2013 at 2:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-20 02:42:17 PM
CHA
 
2013-06-20 02:52:22 PM
If I go crazy then will you still call me Superman?
 
2013-06-20 02:52:55 PM
headcheese2.files.wordpress.com

/supermoon
 
2013-06-20 02:58:58 PM
So if this is the "Super Moon" what's the "Mini-moon" or whatever on the other side of the spectrum and the difference between the two?  Phil cites 1% for last months to this months, but was last months the smallest of the year?

/cursory google commencing
 
2013-06-20 03:09:16 PM

NkThrasher: So if this is the "Super Moon" what's the "Mini-moon" or whatever on the other side of the spectrum and the difference between the two?  Phil cites 1% for last months to this months, but was last months the smallest of the year?

/cursory google commencing


There's a picture with the article that shows the difference.
 
2013-06-20 03:16:42 PM

bingethinker: There's a picture with the article that shows the difference.


That's the difference between apogee and perigee, not necessarily the difference between the closest and farthest full moons of this year in particular (Unless they happen to be at or around apogee and perigee).

My question is what the apparent width of the moon is for the 'smallest' moon of 2013 as compared to this which is the 'biggest', not what the absolute limits are.
 
2013-06-20 05:13:59 PM
Let stupid people think what they want.
What harm could it do letting them believe in supermoons, Santa Claus, and deities?
 
2013-06-20 05:47:12 PM

NkThrasher: bingethinker: There's a picture with the article that shows the difference.

That's the difference between apogee and perigee, not necessarily the difference between the closest and farthest full moons of this year in particular (Unless they happen to be at or around apogee and perigee).

My question is what the apparent width of the moon is for the 'smallest' moon of 2013 as compared to this which is the 'biggest', not what the absolute limits are.


It's practically impossible to perceive the change in apparent size of the moon, since in the night sky there's no frame of reference to compare it against.  At least in theory, it's a little easier when the moon low enough in the night sky that you can use the horizon as a frame of reference, but even then I seem to recall that there are other optical illusions that come into play, at least some of which are still not fully understood.
 
2013-06-20 05:54:42 PM

anfrind: It's practically impossible to perceive the change in apparent size of the moon, since in the night sky there's no frame of reference to compare it against.  At least in theory, it's a little easier when the moon low enough in the night sky that you can use the horizon as a frame of reference, but even then I seem to recall that there are other optical illusions that come into play, at least some of which are still not fully understood.


Apparent width == angular diameter (  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angular_diameter ), which is the precise value of the 'width' in arc seconds (1/3600ths of a degree), not a subjective human "IT LOOKS BIGGAER!"

But yes, humans suck at reliably perceiving those things, however I'm not concerned with that, I'm concerned with the numbers themselves.
 
2013-06-20 09:18:43 PM

Fano: CHA


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