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(Live Science)   Acheologists obsessed with keeping a newly found lost city pristine and unlooted keep talking about the gold that might be there   (livescience.com) divider line 21
    More: Unlikely, Legend of the Lost, lidars, forest canopy, airborne lasers, explorers, National Science Foundation, Honduran  
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2717 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Jun 2013 at 9:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-20 09:45:20 AM
Well it certainly wouldn't be appealing if it was just a treasure trove of artifacts and newly shed light on Mesoamerican history, would it?
 
2013-06-20 09:57:07 AM
It's just a myth, like BIE.
 
2013-06-20 10:03:40 AM
Does it also have a gigantic golden flying machine shaped like a condor?
 
2013-06-20 10:16:58 AM
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2013-06-20 12:25:50 PM
I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.
 
2013-06-20 12:53:15 PM
Is acheologist kinda like a chiropractor?
 
2013-06-20 01:15:13 PM

JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.


So if you find a 3,000 year old fence post used to build an iron age roundhouse, exceedingly rare, you'd catalogue it then harvest it and... I dunno, build a bridge out of it?
 
2013-06-20 02:16:19 PM

Slaxl: JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.

So if you find a 3,000 year old fence post used to build an iron age roundhouse, exceedingly rare, you'd catalogue it then harvest it and... I dunno, build a bridge out of it?


A golden fence post I would.  An iron fencepost not so much.
 
2013-06-20 03:07:43 PM

Slaxl: JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.

So if you find a 3,000 year old fence post used to build an iron age roundhouse, exceedingly rare, you'd catalogue it then harvest it and... I dunno, build a bridge out of it?


Yes, unless someone buys it.
 
2013-06-20 03:24:28 PM

daemoncan:


One of my favorite games of all time. It was a variable open world exploration game before the terms existed.

Also, [itbelongsinameusam.jpg]
 
2013-06-20 04:06:26 PM
What do all you white people want from us?

Your gold.

Oh that's 600 miles south of here.

OK, Bye.

*guffaw*
 
2013-06-20 04:23:46 PM

JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.


You're a Libertarian aren't you?
 
2013-06-20 04:29:32 PM

Latinwolf: JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.

You're a Libertarian aren't you?


In my thought it's that everything is going to become "old", do we really need to preserve it all, so someone in a museum has something to clean?
 
2013-06-20 04:37:33 PM
Cyclonic Cooking Action:

In my thought it's that everything is going to become "old", do we really need to preserve it all, so someone in a museum has something to clean?

Since everything is to become old, lets throw everything in the waste dump and shoot everybody. The 2nd amendement garantees me that right!
 
2013-06-20 05:24:31 PM

Cyclonic Cooking Action: Slaxl: JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.

So if you find a 3,000 year old fence post used to build an iron age roundhouse, exceedingly rare, you'd catalogue it then harvest it and... I dunno, build a bridge out of it?

A golden fence post I would.  An iron fencepost not so much.


Why would you build a bridge out of a golden fence post? I doubt it'd be able to take much weight.

JesusJuice: Slaxl: JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.

So if you find a 3,000 year old fence post used to build an iron age roundhouse, exceedingly rare, you'd catalogue it then harvest it and... I dunno, build a bridge out of it?

Yes, unless someone buys it.


Ah, but someone will always buy it, because a lot of museums rightly recognise important historical stuff and will send people out to go and buy it. Also intelligent wealthy people like to collect antiquities, so they also will bid for rare items as they come up, and then sometimes donate to their favourite museum for a piece of immortality, being remembered as a generous benefactor.
 
2013-06-20 06:14:32 PM

JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.


Technology advances. The photographs taken of an artifact in one year won't be as good as the ones that will be able to be taken in twenty or fifty years. A black and white photo of an artifact found in 1880 won't be as good as a photo taken in 1980, and neither would be as good as the 3D scan that could be done now. Presumably, imaging technology will continue to improve. With the original artifact preserved, as technology advances, new and better analyses can be done of the same object. If the original object is destroyed, the potential to extract information about the object with newer techniques is permanently lost.
 
2013-06-20 09:52:04 PM
What about the white gorillas????
 
2013-06-21 01:57:03 AM

JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.


Age adds value. surviving through the rigors of time makes them rare, and far more valuable than the price of the base metal. Only fools and thieves would melt them down.
 
2013-06-21 10:36:31 AM

Wrencher: JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.

Age adds value. surviving through the rigors of time makes them rare, and far more valuable than the price of the base metal. Only fools and thieves would melt them down.


And Libertarians, you left out Libertarians.  Who cares about history when there's a buck to be made.
 
2013-06-21 11:01:13 AM

Wrencher: JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.

Age adds value. surviving through the rigors of time makes them rare, and far more valuable than the price of the base metal. Only fools and thieves would melt them down.


The only reason age adds value is because fools believe that mere age increases value. All the added value is merely a pissing contest to show people how much money the buyer has to waste on trivial items. If it was possible to create an exact atom for atom copy of the Mona Lisa people would still decry it as a worthless fake just because it wasn't created a few hundred years ago and thus doesn't fit in the "brand" the buyer is trying to get associated with.
 
2013-06-21 12:06:06 PM

DerAppie: Wrencher: JesusJuice: I've never understood why precious metals and gems are off-limits if they're part of something old. Photograph it, catalogue it, study it, and melt it down when you're done. There's no good reason not to harvest a valuable resource just because it's part of something old.

Age adds value. surviving through the rigors of time makes them rare, and far more valuable than the price of the base metal. Only fools and thieves would melt them down.

The only reason age adds value is because fools believe that mere age increases value. All the added value is merely a pissing contest to show people how much money the buyer has to waste on trivial items. If it was possible to create an exact atom for atom copy of the Mona Lisa people would still decry it as a worthless fake just because it wasn't created a few hundred years ago and thus doesn't fit in the "brand" the buyer is trying to get associated with.


No, as perfectly explained by Wrencher, surviving the rigours of time makes them rare, that is the mechanism by which age adds value. Rarity, supply n' demand n' all that. Then on top of that you can add in their significant educational and cultural values. It all adds up to more than merely the value of its constituent components.

There are probably millions of copies of the Mona Lisa hanging in peoples living rooms, lounges, bedrooms, and even in the Louvre, I do believe. So no, people don't decry it as worthless simply because something is a copy.

I hope I'm not talking to Mr. K. Dilkington.
 
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