If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NPR)   How a used bottle becomes a new bottle in six animated gifs   (npr.org) divider line 73
    More: Interesting, dangerous jobs, construction materials, energy saving  
•       •       •

12192 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jun 2013 at 4:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



73 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-06-20 10:03:28 AM  

UsikFark: I want to see how cheerios are made. I'm assuming it's not unlike a pasta machine with a rotating cutter, then they bake the little Os. Or they hire fairies to make tiny oat bagels.


Cheerios are actually breaded rat buttholes.


/The More You Know
 
2013-06-20 10:18:51 AM  
I save my empties to wing at dirty hippies who hitchhike on the side of the highway because their bio-diesel converted 1967  VM bug broke down on the way to the Phish concert.
 
2013-06-20 10:18:59 AM  

UsikFark: lacydog: glass was not profitable

RTFA. They claim they "can't get enough" recycled glass because it costs way less to melt it down than to make new glass from raw materials.


Well, lacydog does have somewhat of a point.  There is no glass recycling in my area of the state because it isn't profitable enough.  The cost of collection, transport, etc. is greater than the value saved by reusing.

/yes, I live in a relatively remote area of the country
 
2013-06-20 10:20:45 AM  

MythDragon: I save my empties to wing at dirty hippies who hitchhike on the side of the highway because their bio-diesel converted 1967  VM bug broke down on the way to the Phish concert.


And I catch them, recycle them and spend the money on dope, organic food and bootleg Phish tapes.

THANKS MAN!

PEACE!
 
2013-06-20 10:22:03 AM  

airsupport: Cheerios are actually breaded rat buttholes.


That's not bread.
 
2013-06-20 10:58:19 AM  
After carefully placing my glass into my recycle bin, how long does it take till it's a broken mess? Do most of them break as soon as they're dumped into the truck? Who knows.
 
2013-06-20 11:20:07 AM  
In New Zealand, they have something called "swap a crate".  It may be jargon, but the gist is that you bring back the crate (12 bottles) back to the store and you get a discount on the next one you buy.  It certainly encouraged me to hold onto my bottles as opposed to throwing them at baby seals.
 
2013-06-20 12:09:32 PM  

UsikFark: Copper Spork: UsikFark: You would use a very fast optical sensor to pull RGB values from each fragment and sort accordingly, I assume.

Why does it need to be fast? You just place it further back on the conveyor belt.

You could drop a stream of glass pieces through the air and have the blower sort them into bins. Why not move the stream as fast as the reader can handle and ship more sorted glass per day? The bit of glass is only going to be in front of the optical device for a fraction of a second.


Or conversely, convince the public that the color of the glass isn't that goddamn important for most beverages and then just mix the colors up willy-nilly.

I said MOST beverages, beer drinkers.
 
2013-06-20 12:19:10 PM  

greenboy: In New Zealand, they have something called "swap a crate".  It may be jargon, but the gist is that you bring back the crate (12 bottles) back to the store and you get a discount on the next one you buy.  It certainly encouraged me to hold onto my bottles as opposed to throwing them at baby seals.


It works that way at the getraenkemarkts (Drink stores) in Germany as well.  You buy a "rack" (large plastic crate like container) with bottles in it of your drink.  You pay a little extra for the rack initially, but after you've drank everything in it you return the rack and the bottles and get the cost of the rack and a small amount for any returned bottles either back as cash or off your next purchase.  So you end up with a few floating euros at your local getrraenkemarkt tied up in however many racks you have in rotation and how many bottles you have out at a given moment.  It was extremely convenient, and I never minded the obvious wear marks on bottles that had been through several rounds of recycling.

With how uber focused on efficiency Germans typically are I can't imagine that they don't have a model where it works and makes business sense.
 
2013-06-20 12:27:05 PM  

UsikFark: lacydog: glass was not profitable

RTFA. They claim they "can't get enough" recycled glass because it costs way less to melt it down than to make new glass from raw materials.


It's not profitable if it has to be shipped so if there is no plant in the local that can process recycled glass then its basically useless to them.

GoodOmens: Still don't understand why our soda companies don't use reusable glass bottles like every other country in this world.  That would be much more green then breaking the bottle down and remelting it.


Because in most cases making new bottles is cheaper than the cost of transporting, cleaning, sterilizing, sorting etc. the old bottles.
 
2013-06-20 12:30:39 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Because in most cases making new bottles is cheaper than the cost of transporting, cleaning, sterilizing, sorting etc. the old bottles.


Then why does Germany do it with their glass bottles?

I'd buy a "With the way American bottling facilities are distributed and equipped" reason, but I can't imagine that it's just inherently inefficient.
 
2013-06-20 12:45:47 PM  
What a depictive image
 
2013-06-20 12:48:46 PM  

Lando Lincoln: Or conversely, convince the public that the color of the glass isn't that goddamn important for most beverages and then just mix the colors up willy-nilly.


That's not the reason to separate the glass colors.

The chemicals used to give glass different colors cause it to melt and take shape at different temperatures.  Having a bit that did not melt going through your bottle machine meant to work with a certain type of glass will destroy it.
 
2013-06-20 02:47:19 PM  
Shouldn't real animated GIFs have no edits in them?
 
2013-06-20 03:03:06 PM  
I grew up in Michigan.  A fond memory I have as a kid is my Polish grandfather taking the wooden crate of empty "Atlas" brand soda bottles back to the plant, and letting me pick out the flavors we'd take back home (Black Cherry was his favorite, I liked Lime).  I never cared that the bottles we brought back might have been scuffed - it made me think about the how long the bottle lasted.

Here at work, I see people tossing their soda cans and bottles in the trash all the time, when we have a big blue recycling can in the kitchen.  People who claim recycling doesn't work - blame the people who aren't using it (World War II showed the huge recycling programs - paper, rubber, tin, etc - helped provide materials to be used again).
 
2013-06-20 03:11:35 PM  
Those who have posted about the recycled glass programs in Germany neglect one very important aspect -- population density.  Germany has ~80M people in a country the size of Montana, ca. 609 people per square mile.  Only New Jersey, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Maryland have that level of density. 35 out of 50 states have less than a third of that, and the overall density of the US is ~ 88.08 inhabitants per square mile.  As many point out, transporting empty glass isn't free, and when manufacturing and distribution are as distant as they are in the US (not to mention the logistics of transport, cleaning, and re-use) the overall feasibility of such a system drops significantly.  And, on top of that, many beers and other bottled beverages come in the same container, so Company X can clean and use bottles that came from Company Y, and vice-versa, but for that to work on US companies, they would have to agree to use a single bottle-type, or on a selection of similar bottles (I do acknowledge that Coca-cola has such a foothold in Europe and elsewhere that they use their own unique-shaped bottles for deposit bottles, but many beers come in a familiar 0,5l brown bottle where the brewer adds the beer, label, and bottlecap.)
 
2013-06-20 03:29:38 PM  

bjorky: Those who have posted about the recycled glass programs in Germany neglect one very important aspect -- population density.  Germany has ~80M people in a country the size of Montana, ca. 609 people per square mile.  Only New Jersey, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Maryland have that level of density. 35 out of 50 states have less than a third of that, and the overall density of the US is ~ 88.08 inhabitants per square mile.  As many point out, transporting empty glass isn't free, and when manufacturing and distribution are as distant as they are in the US (not to mention the logistics of transport, cleaning, and re-use) the overall feasibility of such a system drops significantly.  And, on top of that, many beers and other bottled beverages come in the same container, so Company X can clean and use bottles that came from Company Y, and vice-versa, but for that to work on US companies, they would have to agree to use a single bottle-type, or on a selection of similar bottles (I do acknowledge that Coca-cola has such a foothold in Europe and elsewhere that they use their own unique-shaped bottles for deposit bottles, but many beers come in a familiar 0,5l brown bottle where the brewer adds the beer, label, and bottlecap.)


Sure state by state that density doesn't carry very well, but certainly in places such as New York City even though the state wide density doesn't support it the regional density should.  There's a lot of empty space in upstate New York to skew that number down for the overall state (or a small and very populated area to skew it up, depending on your view).

If we assume that once an area has more than X people per square mile that a bottle reuse program could be more cost efficient than a bottle recycling program, why once we have an area past X people per square mile don't we do it?  Or do we and we just don't realize it?
 
2013-06-20 03:54:42 PM  

NkThrasher: Sure state by state that density doesn't carry very well, but certainly in places such as New York City even though the state wide density doesn't support it the regional density should.  There's a lot of empty space in upstate New York to skew that number down for the overall state (or a small and very populated area to skew it up, depending on your view).

If we assume that once an area has more than X people per square mile that a bottle reuse program could be more cost efficient than a bottle recycling program, why once we have an area past X people per square mile don't we do it?  Or do we and we just don't realize it?


The argument about population density is to point out that there are reasons such a program would work in a place like Germany (where no point in the entire country is more than 876km (544 mi.) from any other, ) and that the country has an overall density of consumers that make such a program practicable.  If you were to build 50 bottle re-use centers in Germany equidistant from each other in the most efficient way possible, each center would service 2756 square miles, or approximately 1.6M consumers per center, servicing the entire country.  Contrast that with placing a center near the 50 largest US cities (and presume that this method is efficient for dealing with all of the bottles within those cities), you have service to a population of ~50-60M total, and that leaves no service to 240-250M other Americans. Even if you inflate that number by 100% by the notion that such a bottle recycling center would service twice as many people in the area as there are in the city's population (suburbs and nearby areas), you still have no service for 2/3 of the country -- and a country that is not at all close together.  When looking at large population cities, the states of Delaware, Maine, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming don't even have cities over 100,000.
 
2013-06-20 03:58:11 PM  
Was I the only one who thought of Phillip Glass music?
farm4.staticflickr.com
 
2013-06-20 04:09:31 PM  

bjorky: The argument about population density is to point out that there are reasons such a program would work in a place like Germany (where no point in the entire country is more than 876km (544 mi.) from any other, ) and that the country has an overall density of consumers that make such a program practicable.  If you were to build 50 bottle re-use centers in Germany equidistant from each other in the most efficient way possible, each center would service 2756 square miles, or approximately 1.6M consumers per center, servicing the entire country.  Contrast that with placing a center near the 50 largest US cities (and presume that this method is efficient for dealing with all of the bottles within those cities), you have service to a population of ~50-60M total, and that leaves no service to 240-250M other Americans. Even if you inflate that number by 100% by the notion that such a bottle recycling center would service twice as many people in the area as there are in the city's population (suburbs and nearby areas), you still have no service for 2/3 of the country -- and a country that is not at all close together.  When looking at large population cities, the states of Delaware, Maine, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming don't even have cities over 100,000.


Well yes, the areas outside those cities would use a system like what is used now, this obviously isn't an all or nothing operation.

The question is why wouldn't drink producing companies want to do this for large population centers?
 
2013-06-20 04:41:20 PM  

Todd300: Oh goodie, which gif details the chinese kids melting them down?

Or I know, how about a shiny infographic showing how more petro resources go into 'recycling' an item verses disposal?

Want to help the enviroment? Stop buying shiat.


Want to post in a thread with coming off as an ignorant moron? Start reading the articles first.

I would guess that there aren't a lot of Chinese kids working in a glass factory in Salem, New Jersey. There's also this quote from the factory's GM "Recycled glass melts at a lower temperature than the raw materials used to make glass from scratch. So more recycled glass means huge energy savings."
 
2013-06-20 08:10:21 PM  

NkThrasher: ReapTheChaos: Because in most cases making new bottles is cheaper than the cost of transporting, cleaning, sterilizing, sorting etc. the old bottles.

Then why does Germany do it with their glass bottles?

I'd buy a "With the way American bottling facilities are distributed and equipped" reason, but I can't imagine that it's just inherently inefficient.


That must be something new because when I was in Germany they never reused bottles, between me and my friends we went through a ton of beer and not one of them was in a returnable bottle.
 
2013-06-21 11:37:50 AM  
For all of you people worrying about how to handle your empty beer bottles, start brewing or find a friend that brews. And if you're between batches, only buy the ones with pop tops, not pisswater in twisties.

Everything with homebrew has to be sterilized anyway, so as long as you give them a quick rinse when you drink it, your local homebrewer can probably find a use (unless she's moved on to kegs or something).
 
Displayed 23 of 73 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report