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(Lexington Herald Leader)   To appeal to foodie wannabes, fast food chains and industrial food suppliers are engineering new generation of "rustic" pizzas and "hand-sliced" ham, lab-crafted, distressed and machine-cut to look homemade   (kentucky.com) divider line 104
    More: Ironic, fast food restaurants, hams, ham, Euromonitor, Stern School of Business, breakfast sandwich, pizzas, cookie cutter  
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6565 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jun 2013 at 2:51 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-20 12:23:32 AM
It's one reason why Wendy's softened the edges of its famously square hamburger patties. The Dublin, Ohio-based company says it changed the patty to a "natural square" with wavy edges because tasters said the straight edges looked processed.

Who the fark cares how their hamburger is shaped?
 
2013-06-20 02:54:45 AM
Yum?

img.fark.net
 
2013-06-20 02:55:15 AM
I think if you care more about how your food looks than how it tastes, you're doing it really wrong.  Unless it looks like vomit.  I've been to a lot of fancy diners where people insist on serving vomit.  That helps no one.  For the record, anything with bits of tofu or couscous looks like vomit.
 
2013-06-20 02:55:37 AM
Am I supposed to be aghast that a business wants to try to please its customers?
 
2013-06-20 02:56:42 AM

fusillade762: It's one reason why Wendy's softened the edges of its famously square hamburger patties. The Dublin, Ohio-based company says it changed the patty to a "natural square" with wavy edges because tasters said the straight edges looked processed.

Who the fark cares how their hamburger is shaped?


I'm wondering how anyone can think a hamburger *doesn't* look processed.
 
2013-06-20 02:57:31 AM

jjorsett: Am I supposed to be aghast that a business wants to try to please its customers?


I think the issue is that people want natural product so fast food place processes the food more to make it look natural
 
2013-06-20 02:58:11 AM
Over the past five years, the overall packaged food industry in North America grew 14 percent to $392.5 billion, according to market researcher Euromonitor International. The fast-food industry meanwhile rose 13 percent to $225.6 billion

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2013/06/17/2681934/food-companies-work-to-mak e -it.html#storylink=cpy
Don't forget to factor in inflation, which has been a cumulative 8% in the past five years.
 
2013-06-20 02:58:13 AM

cyberspacedout: fusillade762: It's one reason why Wendy's softened the edges of its famously square hamburger patties. The Dublin, Ohio-based company says it changed the patty to a "natural square" with wavy edges because tasters said the straight edges looked processed.

Who the fark cares how their hamburger is shaped?

I'm wondering how anyone can think a hamburger *doesn't* look processed.


By sticking your head in the bulls ass ? Or was that a t bone
 
2013-06-20 03:00:42 AM
its no different than major breweries trying to fit in with the craft beer niche by changing packaging, its still the same crappy product
 
2013-06-20 03:01:26 AM
img.hsmagazine.net
 
2013-06-20 03:06:43 AM
'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.
 
2013-06-20 03:08:01 AM
Companies have been making and selling "distressed" hardwood floors and furniture for years now. Why not food?

/ABC gum!
 
2013-06-20 03:14:43 AM

illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.


It's called brand aspiration. Kitchenaid makes good stuff, right? So a company like Kitchenaid produces a couple items that are only sold at Kmart and Target so they can get a slice of lower-income purchasers who don't have $300 for a mixer but might have $20 for a can opener. Likewise, a company that makes $400-1000 purses can sell $60 sunglasses with a huge logo on the temples.
/has a new Kitchenaid manual can opener that is rusting through the chrome finish
 
2013-06-20 03:20:04 AM
if you want that home made look, it's not farking rocket science to cook your own meat.
 
2013-06-20 03:45:40 AM

UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration. Kitchenaid makes good stuff, right? So a company like Kitchenaid produces a couple items that are only sold at Kmart and Target so they can get a slice of lower-income purchasers who don't have $300 for a mixer but might have $20 for a can opener. Likewise, a company that makes $400-1000 purses can sell $60 sunglasses with a huge logo on the temples.
/has a new Kitchenaid manual can opener that is rusting through the chrome finish


Don't be farkin' dissin' on my KitchenAid, mofo.  I will CUT you.
 
2013-06-20 03:47:26 AM
With the caveat that the food tastes good, I say Sure, why not? Presentation is part of the food experience.
 
2013-06-20 03:47:57 AM

gadian: I think if you care more about how your food looks than how it tastes, you're doing it really wrong.  Unless it looks like vomit.  I've been to a lot of fancy diners where people insist on serving vomit.  That helps no one.  For the record, anything with bits of tofu or couscous looks like vomit.


iirc, fast food nation has an anecdote about a psychological experiment with food. they had volunteers eat steaks dyed green, but wasn't aware of the color because the room was lit in green light. the initial reactions were positive, everyone liked the steak. then they switched from green to white light, and all the volunteers expressed being ill. like they say, presentation is everything.
 
2013-06-20 04:01:13 AM
That cracks me up.

I recall, decades ago, when I learned how to make 'distressed' old looking 'collectable' furniture from a DIY magazine. Hit it with chains, burn it with a blow torch, use rusty nails, don't sand it too smooth and how to apply stain to make it look aged.

Someone made tables out of old, wooden ships hatch covers and the Yuppies loved them, promptly elevating the cost from under a hundred bucks to several hundred -- and initiating a rush on grabbing old wooden hatches and covers from derelict ships.

When they ran out of stuff, they learned how to fake age wood to look like it had spent decades at sea.

People are suckers. Look at the new business which has popped up where guys go and get icebergs, melt them down and sell the bottled water for a couple of bucks a unit.

Then again, just look at the multi-billion dollar a year bottled water business anyhow.
BTW, a lot of the old, hand made pastries and breads that folks rave about now, actually kind of sucked. I've had some. My grandpa used to love to bake the old recipes. They tended to be heavy. Without preservatives, they had a shelf life of days. Some used a lot of lard. All were labor intensive to make.
 
2013-06-20 04:01:47 AM

UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration. Kitchenaid makes good stuff, right? So a company like Kitchenaid produces a couple items that are only sold at Kmart and Target so they can get a slice of lower-income purchasers who don't have $300 for a mixer but might have $20 for a can opener. Likewise, a company that makes $400-1000 purses can sell $60 sunglasses with a huge logo on the temples.
/has a new Kitchenaid manual can opener that is rusting through the chrome finish


Are you implying that you paid twenty dollars for that can opener?
 
2013-06-20 04:08:39 AM

UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration. Kitchenaid makes good stuff, right? So a company like Kitchenaid produces a couple items that are only sold at Kmart and Target so they can get a slice of lower-income purchasers who don't have $300 for a mixer but might have $20 for a can opener. Likewise, a company that makes $400-1000 purses can sell $60 sunglasses with a huge logo on the temples.
/has a new Kitchenaid manual can opener that is rusting through the chrome finish


Old news.  Back in the sixties, when my mom was working part-time in housewares and appliances at Sears, she learned that Sears' Kenmore stuff was actually made by the big appliance companies and was pretty much the same as those brands.  Back then, at least, every year, Sears would have a bidding contest among appliance manufacturers as to who would make that year's Kenmore stuff.  One year it would be Kitchenaid, the next GE, the next someone else.   The same was true with power tools in hardware and automotive stuff.

About twelve years ago, I had a summer temp job at the Sears.com office in West Des Moines and found it was still the case.
 
2013-06-20 04:13:25 AM

not5am: gadian: I think if you care more about how your food looks than how it tastes, you're doing it really wrong.  Unless it looks like vomit.  I've been to a lot of fancy diners where people insist on serving vomit.  That helps no one.  For the record, anything with bits of tofu or couscous looks like vomit.

iirc, fast food nation has an anecdote about a psychological experiment with food. they had volunteers eat steaks dyed green, but wasn't aware of the color because the room was lit in green light. the initial reactions were positive, everyone liked the steak. then they switched from green to white light, and all the volunteers expressed being ill. like they say, presentation is everything.


It is a good evolutionary move to be repulsed by green meat.
 
2013-06-20 04:20:17 AM

ghostfacekillahrabbit: UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration.

Are you implying that you paid twenty dollars for that can opener?


I think it was 6.99, probably made by the same company that makes all the other non-stamped "ergonomic" can openers but decals on a different name for a different price. I can easily see a can opener going for $20 if it had the right brand on it. Here is a $21 bottle opener: Link and a $50 manual can opener Link
Rethink Possible.
 
2013-06-20 04:21:44 AM

Aulus: West Des Moines


I used to live in DSM. West Des Moines was a little more "boutique" then where I was.
 
2013-06-20 04:25:17 AM

Rik01: People are suckers. Look at the new business which has popped up where guys go and get icebergs, melt them down and sell the bottled water for a couple of bucks a unit.


It's not that it's from icebergs that is important. It's that someone has cared enough to do a half decent job of making the product, rather than it being made by minimum wage McJob workers who will drop your food on the floor and serve it to you anyway.
 
2013-06-20 04:37:03 AM

UsikFark: I think it was 6.99, probably made by the same company that makes all the other non-stamped "ergonomic" can openers but decals on a different name for a different price. I can easily see a can opener going for $20 if it had the right brand on it. Here is a $21 bottle opener: Link and a $50 manual can opener Link
Rethink Possible.


Oh, oh dear.  that's a piece of shiat.  Go buy yourself an OXO smooth-edge can opener.

I don't even know who owns KitchenAid today, but their mixers still seem to be okay.  Originally, they were an off-shoot of Hobart, and the home mixers were a small version of these beasts:

www.deliciousmusings.com

/My mother has a KitchenAid that's six or eight years older than I am, which makes it at least 40.
 
2013-06-20 04:46:56 AM

Dwight_Yeast: these beasts


Jesus. I bet you could drop a live goat in there and it would keep on mixing.
 
2013-06-20 04:53:03 AM
img.fark.net
 
2013-06-20 05:02:13 AM
my dad came back from Nam and gave me a free can opener.
 
2013-06-20 05:02:15 AM

Benevolent Misanthrope: UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration. Kitchenaid makes good stuff, right? So a company like Kitchenaid produces a couple items that are only sold at Kmart and Target so they can get a slice of lower-income purchasers who don't have $300 for a mixer but might have $20 for a can opener. Likewise, a company that makes $400-1000 purses can sell $60 sunglasses with a huge logo on the temples.
/has a new Kitchenaid manual can opener that is rusting through the chrome finish

Don't be farkin' dissin' on my KitchenAid, mofo.  I will CUT you.


I hate my kitchen aid mixer. Underpowered, the lock for the mixer arm didn't work until I ground down the metal a bit. All the attachments are stupid expensive. I wish I went to a used commercial kitchen supplier and bought a proper one. Kitchen aid has gone Waaay down hill in the last 20 years.
 
2013-06-20 05:13:10 AM

UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration. Kitchenaid makes good stuff, right? So a company like Kitchenaid produces a couple items that are only sold at Kmart and Target so they can get a slice of lower-income purchasers who don't have $300 for a mixer but might have $20 for a can opener. Likewise, a company that makes $400-1000 purses can sell $60 sunglasses with a huge logo on the temples.
/has a new Kitchenaid manual can opener that is rusting through the chrome finish


should have bought the Ford Aspire for your rust and aspirational needs
 
2013-06-20 05:20:12 AM

UsikFark: ghostfacekillahrabbit: UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration.

Are you implying that you paid twenty dollars for that can opener?

I think it was 6.99, probably made by the same company that makes all the other non-stamped "ergonomic" can openers but decals on a different name for a different price. I can easily see a can opener going for $20 if it had the right brand on it. Here is a $21 bottle opener: Link and a $50 manual can opener Link
Rethink Possible.


UsikFark:... 'Rethink Possible'

Possible like an NSA pimple on your network's ass.
 
2013-06-20 05:28:06 AM
FTA: At Hillshire Brands Co., which makes lunch meats, hot dogs and sausages, executives also are attuned to the fact that more people prize foods they feel are natural. At an industry conference in February, CEO Sean Connolly noted that in addition to taste, the appearance of its food needed work.

I'll take ass meat for $300, Alex.
 
2013-06-20 05:28:23 AM

Todd300: UsikFark: ghostfacekillahrabbit: UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration.

Are you implying that you paid twenty dollars for that can opener?

I think it was 6.99, probably made by the same company that makes all the other non-stamped "ergonomic" can openers but decals on a different name for a different price. I can easily see a can opener going for $20 if it had the right brand on it. Here is a $21 bottle opener: Link and a $50 manual can opener Link
Rethink Possible.

UsikFark:... 'Rethink Possible'

Possible like an NSA pimple on your network's ass.


Yes, data management innovation! Next comes some service plan compartmentalized pricing innovation! We are excited about what we can do to our customers, you won't believe!
 
2013-06-20 05:31:13 AM

Copper Spork: Rik01: People are suckers. Look at the new business which has popped up where guys go and get icebergs, melt them down and sell the bottled water for a couple of bucks a unit.

It's not that it's from icebergs that is important. It's that someone has cared enough to do a half decent job of making the product, rather than it being made by minimum wage McJob workers who will drop your food on the floor and serve it to you anyway.


I don't know if I would call corralling icebergs to make bottled water doing a half-decent job, in that I'm sure there are many cheaper, more efficient, better tasting, healthier, more environmentally friendly,  and all around just better ways to make bottled water, even bottled water of such quality that it is rare and expensive, than corralling and melting icebergs. I'm still not even sure why we need to pay thousands of times more to have plastic around our water in the first place. Public water supplies were some of our best early work. You'd think we'd be working on bigger things nowadays than trying to make water distribution more expensive and less efficient.
 
2013-06-20 05:39:41 AM

UsikFark: I think it was 6.99, probably made by the same company that makes all the other non-stamped "ergonomic" can openers but decals on a different name for a different price. I can easily see a can opener going for $20 if it had the right brand on it. Here is a $21 bottle opener: Link and a $50 manual can opener Link
Rethink Possible.


As long as the people who are buying expensive manual can-openers got them for their own personal use, and not just because watching the maid really work to open that can is classier than watching her push a button.
-Karl Marx
 
2013-06-20 05:48:47 AM

Aulus: UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration. Kitchenaid makes good stuff, right? So a company like Kitchenaid produces a couple items that are only sold at Kmart and Target so they can get a slice of lower-income purchasers who don't have $300 for a mixer but might have $20 for a can opener. Likewise, a company that makes $400-1000 purses can sell $60 sunglasses with a huge logo on the temples.
/has a new Kitchenaid manual can opener that is rusting through the chrome finish

Old news.  Back in the sixties, when my mom was working part-time in housewares and appliances at Sears, she learned that Sears' Kenmore stuff was actually made by the big appliance companies and was pretty much the same as those brands.  Back then, at least, every year, Sears would have a bidding contest among appliance manufacturers as to who would make that year's Kenmore stuff.  One year it would be Kitchenaid, the next GE, the next someone else.   The same was true with power tools in hardware and automotive stuff.

About twelve years ago, I had a summer temp job at the Sears.com office in West Des Moines and found it was still the case.


My boss went on some sort of backpacking tour/year out to Australia back in the day and ended up working at an Ice Cream factory. They would be packaging the product in some budget supermarket Ice Cream boxes, then once those were done a load of premium brand Ice Cream (which were the actual owners of the factory), and then some mid-brand cartons. Nothing during the process actually changed apart from the labels on the packaging.
 
2013-06-20 06:04:05 AM
Or you can go to your local butcher or deli and get ham sliced for you, or to your local pizza place and have them make a pie while you wait...
Fast food is fast food. If you don't want fast food, don't go to a fast food place. What's the problem?
 
2013-06-20 06:09:40 AM

Rik01: All were labor intensive to make.


Yep as they were probably designed to be cooked/baked by either a baker or your stay at home wife.

A lof of this 'foodie' stuff I see being derided is basically:  How to get a housewife cooked meal, when you don't have a housewife... because she's busy working her ass off same as you.
 
2013-06-20 06:19:00 AM

gadian: I think if you care more about how your food looks than how it tastes, you're doing it really wrong.


Never become a chef, ok?
 
2013-06-20 06:25:54 AM

fusillade762: It's one reason why Wendy's softened the edges of its famously square hamburger patties. The Dublin, Ohio-based company says it changed the patty to a "natural square" with wavy edges because tasters said the straight edges looked processed.

Who the fark cares how their hamburger is shaped?


Exactly, that's why I eat here.
 
2013-06-20 06:26:58 AM
4 words:
Tostito's Artisanal Tortilla Chips.

/"Artisanal" means nothing
 
2013-06-20 06:29:42 AM

Todd300: FTA: At Hillshire Brands Co., which makes lunch meats, hot dogs and sausages, executives also are attuned to the fact that more people prize foods they feel are natural. At an industry conference in February, CEO Sean Connolly noted that in addition to taste, the appearance of its food needed work.

I'll take ass meat for $300, Alex.


That there's some sweet ass-meat.
 
2013-06-20 06:56:54 AM

Dwight_Yeast: UsikFark: I think it was 6.99, probably made by the same company that makes all the other non-stamped "ergonomic" can openers but decals on a different name for a different price. I can easily see a can opener going for $20 if it had the right brand on it. Here is a $21 bottle opener: Link and a $50 manual can opener Link
Rethink Possible.

Oh, oh dear.  that's a piece of shiat.  Go buy yourself an OXO smooth-edge can opener.

I don't even know who owns KitchenAid today, but their mixers still seem to be okay.  Originally, they were an off-shoot of Hobart, and the home mixers were a small version of these beasts:

[www.deliciousmusings.com image 850x1133]

/My mother has a KitchenAid that's six or eight years older than I am, which makes it at least 40.


The old KitchenAid mixers were built like battleships.  Any sold within the past ten years or so are pieces of crap.  KitchenAid, like all good American companies, has decided to rely on its brand image rather than make a good product.  The gears in the mixers used to be made of metal; now they're made of plastic.
 
2013-06-20 07:02:58 AM
No processed food is made in your best interest. Except pickles. Pickles are 100% awesome 8 days a week.
 
2013-06-20 07:03:29 AM

Copper Spork: Rik01: People are suckers. Look at the new business which has popped up where guys go and get icebergs, melt them down and sell the bottled water for a couple of bucks a unit.

It's not that it's from icebergs that is important. It's that someone has cared enough to do a half decent job of making the product, rather than it being made by minimum wage McJob workers who will drop your food on the floor and serve it to you anyway.


Some of that iceberg water is pretty damned good. Fiji water used to be good a decade ago or so ago, but last time I tried it it tasted like every other bottled water. Best water I ever had was out of a tap in Montana.
 
2013-06-20 07:03:35 AM
What a "rustic" pizza might look like

img.fark.net
 
2013-06-20 07:07:50 AM

hlehmann: The gears in the mixers used to be made of metal; now they're made of plastic.


The Pro 600 that I bought several years ago has metal gears and gear box... I think they switched back to metal at some point for their high-end mixers
 
2013-06-20 07:07:59 AM
...And they know full well that all us rubes will indeed fall for it.
 
2013-06-20 07:08:35 AM
Top Secret info: Instead of paying $15 for a delivered artisan pizza, make your own for $5 or less. Don't tell anybody I told you this, but you can get the ingredients really cheap at a local "dollar store". Shhhhhhh!!!!!!
 
2013-06-20 07:14:56 AM
www.grubgrade.com
 
2013-06-20 07:19:46 AM

hlehmann: Dwight_Yeast: UsikFark: I think it was 6.99, probably made by the same company that makes all the other non-stamped "ergonomic" can openers but decals on a different name for a different price. I can easily see a can opener going for $20 if it had the right brand on it. Here is a $21 bottle opener: Link and a $50 manual can opener Link
Rethink Possible.

Oh, oh dear.  that's a piece of shiat.  Go buy yourself an OXO smooth-edge can opener.

I don't even know who owns KitchenAid today, but their mixers still seem to be okay.  Originally, they were an off-shoot of Hobart, and the home mixers were a small version of these beasts:

[www.deliciousmusings.com image 850x1133]

/My mother has a KitchenAid that's six or eight years older than I am, which makes it at least 40.

The old KitchenAid mixers were built like battleships.  Any sold within the past ten years or so are pieces of crap.  KitchenAid, like all good American companies, has decided to rely on its brand image rather than make a good product.  The gears in the mixers used to be made of metal; now they're made of plastic.


Depends on the model. I just picked up a Professional series mixer a couple of months ago. All steel transmission. I'm quite pleased with it.
 
2013-06-20 07:23:30 AM

mike_d85: 4 words:
Tostito's Artisanal Tortilla Chips.

/"Artisanal" means nothing


Art is Anal?
 
2013-06-20 07:26:55 AM
FTA:   Ultimately, Moore said the change didn't really impact the taste.  Because it still tastes like cooked feet.

\Loves to cook
\\Hates douchebag "foodie" people
\\\

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2013/06/17/2681934/food-companies-work-to-mak e -it.html#storylink=cpy
 
2013-06-20 07:35:29 AM

gittlebass: [img.hsmagazine.net image 500x500]


I chuckled.
 
2013-06-20 07:44:39 AM
Sounds like hipster shiat.
 
2013-06-20 07:50:43 AM

voodoohotdog: mike_d85: 4 words:
Tostito's Artisanal Tortilla Chips.

/"Artisanal" means nothing

Art is Anal?


Film students have been telling models that for years.
 
2013-06-20 07:56:21 AM

ghostfacekillahrabbit: not5am: gadian: I think if you care more about how your food looks than how it tastes, you're doing it really wrong.  Unless it looks like vomit.  I've been to a lot of fancy diners where people insist on serving vomit.  That helps no one.  For the record, anything with bits of tofu or couscous looks like vomit.

iirc, fast food nation has an anecdote about a psychological experiment with food. they had volunteers eat steaks dyed green, but wasn't aware of the color because the room was lit in green light. the initial reactions were positive, everyone liked the steak. then they switched from green to white light, and all the volunteers expressed being ill. like they say, presentation is everything.

It is a good evolutionary move to be repulsed by green meat.


Probably a sort of "uncanny valley" effect, much like how the uncanny valley comes from how humans recognize other humans, but know to avoid corpses.

We are wired to know what our food should look like, or at least recognize what's probably good and probably bad.  Green meat = bad.   The entire thing about the appearance of food affecting its taste probably plays into it.
 
2013-06-20 08:19:03 AM
How pathetic your life must be if you're a "foodie wannabe".

Being a "foodie" is the epitome of failure. And there are some people who can't even manage that?
 
2013-06-20 08:27:07 AM
People won't eat gray Cheetos. They tested it during attempts to ban yellow 5, and without the food coloring, people thought Cheetos were more disgusting than usual. Appearance does matter!

/why they color margarine
//gray, chemically created foods are usually pretty nasty before they are "touched up"
 
ows
2013-06-20 08:30:44 AM

gadian: I think if you care more about how your food looks than how it tastes, you're doing it really wrong.  Unless it looks like vomit.  I've been to a lot of fancy diners where people insist on serving vomit.  That helps no one.  For the record, anything with bits of tofu or couscous looks like vomit.


mmmmm, i'm making beef stroganoff tonight.
 
2013-06-20 08:30:52 AM
My favorite food scam is charging a premium for the most common breed of beef cow in the U.S.  Get your Angus suckers!
 
2013-06-20 08:35:02 AM

gadian: I think if you care more about how your food looks than how it tastes, you're doing it really wrong.  Unless it looks like vomit.  I've been to a lot of fancy diners where people insist on serving vomit.  That helps no one.  For the record, anything with bits of tofu or couscous looks like vomit.


img.fark.net

MMm.. delicious pork tofu vomit
 
2013-06-20 08:35:37 AM

Benevolent Misanthrope: UsikFark: illannoyin: 

Don't be farkin' dissin' on my KitchenAid, mofo.  I will CUT you.


Fine then but I will.  A few years ago, I was getting my start in life, living by myself, barely scraping by.  I had to buy a number of basic things to have a working, liveable kitchen.  Despite being broke, I opted to "spend a little more" and buy recognizable name brands for certain things, like kitchen utensils and cooking supplies, under the misguided belief that it's better to pay a little more now for something that lasts.

The KitchenAid stuff is crap, no better than the much cheaper generic stuff in terms of durability and function.  Period.  I paid more for stuff that never worked quite right and/or broke and had to be replaced within a year or two.  The brand name's reputation is an illusion.
 
2013-06-20 08:38:03 AM

LordOfThePings: Yum?

[img.fark.net image 500x333]


Yes.
 
2013-06-20 08:52:50 AM

hlehmann: The old KitchenAid mixers were built like battleships.  Any sold within the past ten years or so are pieces of crap.  KitchenAid, like all good American companies, has decided to rely on its brand image rather than make a good product.  The gears in the mixers used to be made of metal; now they're made of plastic.


Well said. I have a KitchenAid K-45 mixer that my parents purchased in January, 1974, and it still works like it's brand new and have never had even the slightest problem with it. The sales receipt shows the cost was $101.72, including tax.
 
2013-06-20 08:52:56 AM
Things must be pretty good in America if people have time to complain about this.
 
2013-06-20 08:55:40 AM

MrHappyRotter: Benevolent Misanthrope: UsikFark: illannoyin: 

Don't be farkin' dissin' on my KitchenAid, mofo.  I will CUT you.

Fine then but I will.  A few years ago, I was getting my start in life, living by myself, barely scraping by.  I had to buy a number of basic things to have a working, liveable kitchen.  Despite being broke, I opted to "spend a little more" and buy recognizable name brands for certain things, like kitchen utensils and cooking supplies, under the misguided belief that it's better to pay a little more now for something that lasts.

The KitchenAid stuff is crap, no better than the much cheaper generic stuff in terms of durability and function.  Period.  I paid more for stuff that never worked quite right and/or broke and had to be replaced within a year or two.  The brand name's reputation is an illusion.


My KitchenAid stand mixer is fantastic. Yes, if you buy the Walmart special $99 on sale model, you will get shiat. (shiat, by the way that lasts though 5 years of heavy use, including pasta, sausge, and bread.). If, however, you buy the more expensive "Pro" model, with the metal gears and better tranny, it is absolutely worth it. If you need a stand mixer at all.

Seriously - it's like comparing my Waring Pro restaurant grade stick blender with the Waring $10 stick blender you can get at Walmart. All brands have quality lines and shiatty lines. Choose wisely.
 
2013-06-20 08:56:01 AM
What will they come up with next? Intentionally fading and distressing jeans?
 
2013-06-20 08:57:03 AM

xria: They would be packaging the product in some budget supermarket Ice Cream boxes, then once those were done a load of premium brand Ice Cream (which were the actual owners of the factory), and then some mid-brand cartons. Nothing during the process actually changed apart from the labels on the packaging.


You know, I've heard this claim many times about food, and I'm even sympathetic to the idea that it's true, but I've been grocery shopping for a couple of decades and have tried a lot of different products and I just don't see (or taste) the evidence that the practice is at all widespread.  Perhaps the less expensive repackaged brands are kept out of same stores/regions that also carry the premium product and therefore I've never ran into two ice creams (or whatever food) being exactly the same with different labels and price points.   People say this all the time about store brands and generics, but I've yet to taste a store brand that was exactly the same as any of the name brand products in the same store.  We prefer some of the store brands, actually.

Now, when it comes to appliances and electronics, one can clearly see nearly identical products with different brand names.   One just needs to order a replacement part.
 
2013-06-20 09:00:01 AM
on fast food being manufactured to look more "real"
it's fast food...it's always been manufactured...if anyone thinks the turkey on their jack-in-the-box turkey panini is handsliced by folks who care in the kitchen, then they're stupid. with that said, as a lifelong lover of fastfood, i must say that now more than ever you can find some good variety in a fast food restaurant. is it chef-quality high end stuff? nope. but it's good for what it is...inexpensive convenience food.

on kitchenaid
i have no doubt that, like most other things, the quality has slipped over the years in favor of cheaper parts and labor. unfortunately that's the world we live in. however, the $200 i spent 3 years ago on my wife's kitchenaid mixer for our anniversary was $200 well spent. it works well for home use, has all the power we'll ever need, and most importantly she's far happier with it than she was with the cuisenart stand mixer her grandmother had bought her.

we've been thru 2 electric & 3 manual can openers in 5 years, none of which worked well from the start. recently bought the $6.99 kitchenaid manual, have opened 1 can with it, and it's by far the easiest/quickest can opening experience i've had in 5 years

on appliances
just bought a 7.whateverfraction cu. ft. chest freezer. name on the label is IGLOO...never knew they had a line of freezers...looks exactly like any other basic model 7 cu. ft. chest freezer...kenmore, ge, etc. probably IS the exact same. but i got it on sale at best buy for about $25 cheaper than any other brand i'd looked at.

on brands
i've worked at a factory bakery...yes there would be 5 different labels/bags, ranging from generic brands to fancier brands, being filled on the same conveyer belt from the same batch.
 
2013-06-20 09:06:24 AM

DrBrownCow: xria: They would be packaging the product in some budget supermarket Ice Cream boxes, then once those were done a load of premium brand Ice Cream (which were the actual owners of the factory), and then some mid-brand cartons. Nothing during the process actually changed apart from the labels on the packaging.

You know, I've heard this claim many times about food, and I'm even sympathetic to the idea that it's true, but I've been grocery shopping for a couple of decades and have tried a lot of different products and I just don't see (or taste) the evidence that the practice is at all widespread.  Perhaps the less expensive repackaged brands are kept out of same stores/regions that also carry the premium product and therefore I've never ran into two ice creams (or whatever food) being exactly the same with different labels and price points.   People say this all the time about store brands and generics, but I've yet to taste a store brand that was exactly the same as any of the name brand products in the same store.  We prefer some of the store brands, actually.

Now, when it comes to appliances and electronics, one can clearly see nearly identical products with different brand names.   One just needs to order a replacement part.


truth. i also believe they mix it up regionally, or something to that effect.

there are some store brands i'd just as soon have as the name brand, but the problem is the "premium" store brands typically cost really close to the name brand prices these days (ahem, target's archer farms!). there are some things we're very happy paying less for...some store brands we do like better than or at least as well as the name brands, and some things that we MUST get the name brand for.

we buy a large amount of our staple foods at aldi. my 3 year old son prefers aldi's shells and cheese macaroni to velveeta's, and it's 1/2 the price
 
2013-06-20 09:18:40 AM
Things may have changed in the last 30+ years, but I found it interesting that one of the examples of processed foods that they cited was the "round discs" used in Egg McMuffins.  Those eggs were probably the least processed thing on McD's menu way back when I worked the grill.  I'm not vouching for English muffin, cheese or Canadian bacon, but the eggs came in fresh (i.e., in the shell).  Crack egg into ring, break yolk, a little water for steam and cover.  That was it.  At the time, McD's took some pride in being the only fast food place (at least in our little town) that actually used fresh eggs.
 
2013-06-20 09:20:50 AM
I really like the Carving Board line of meats. They taste great and a welcome change from the decades of thin deli slices. By the way, they are way more expensive, and worth it. That doesn't make me a foodie wannabe.
 
2013-06-20 09:25:10 AM

muwaryer: Things may have changed in the last 30+ years, but I found it interesting that one of the examples of processed foods that they cited was the "round discs" used in Egg McMuffins.  Those eggs were probably the least processed thing on McD's menu way back when I worked the grill.  I'm not vouching for English muffin, cheese or Canadian bacon, but the eggs came in fresh (i.e., in the shell).  Crack egg into ring, break yolk, a little water for steam and cover.  That was it.  At the time, McD's took some pride in being the only fast food place (at least in our little town) that actually used fresh eggs.


i always crack up at the photoshop pic of the egg loaf thing being sliced to make egg mcmuffins, knowing since i was a child that the egg on that sandwich was the freshest, least processed thing mcdonalds has on the menu. it's so cheap and easy to make an egg like that, why bother having some manufacturing process for it?
 
2013-06-20 09:28:42 AM

Aulus: UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration. Kitchenaid makes good stuff, right? So a company like Kitchenaid produces a couple items that are only sold at Kmart and Target so they can get a slice of lower-income purchasers who don't have $300 for a mixer but might have $20 for a can opener. Likewise, a company that makes $400-1000 purses can sell $60 sunglasses with a huge logo on the temples.
/has a new Kitchenaid manual can opener that is rusting through the chrome finish

Old news.  Back in the sixties, when my mom was working part-time in housewares and appliances at Sears, she learned that Sears' Kenmore stuff was actually made by the big appliance companies and was pretty much the same as those brands.  Back then, at least, every year, Sears would have a bidding contest among appliance manufacturers as to who would make that year's Kenmore stuff.  One year it would be Kitchenaid, the next GE, the next someone else.   The same was true with power tools in hardware and automotive stuff.

About twelve years ago, I had a summer temp job at the Sears.com office in West Des Moines and found it was still the case.


And probably each year, GE and Kitchen aid having a bidding contest to see which group of Chinese children will actually make their product.
 
2013-06-20 09:42:32 AM

not5am: gadian: I think if you care more about how your food looks than how it tastes, you're doing it really wrong.  Unless it looks like vomit.  I've been to a lot of fancy diners where people insist on serving vomit.  That helps no one.  For the record, anything with bits of tofu or couscous looks like vomit.

iirc, fast food nation has an anecdote about a psychological experiment with food. they had volunteers eat steaks dyed green, but wasn't aware of the color because the room was lit in green light. the initial reactions were positive, everyone liked the steak. then they switched from green to white light, and all the volunteers expressed being ill. like they say, presentation is everything.


At the extremes it is. But a green piece of steak is not at the same level of presentation as a slightly less round pizza.
 
2013-06-20 09:56:09 AM
What's next?????

i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-20 10:03:00 AM

greggm59: I have a KitchenAid K-45 mixer that my parents purchased in January, 1974, and it still works like it's brand new and have never had even the slightest problem with it. The sales receipt shows the cost was $101.72, including tax.


That would be about 480 in today's dollars, which sounds about right.   Our KitchenAid mixer was $300 ten years ago and it is going strong.  I don't know if it has plastic or metal gears, but I think it could double as a blacksmith's anvil.
 
2013-06-20 10:11:24 AM
When I was in grad school I bought a crappy duplex in a terrible neighborhood.  I worked in a bakery all through high school and college, so I wanted a nice mixer and did a bunch of research and got a 'good' KitchenAid. I wanted a bowl lift instead of the tilt head and made sure to get one with metal gears and such.  I trolled sales flyers and finally found a killer deal for the good model at a discount store.  It still represented a huge purchase for me.

It turned out to be the nicest thing in that crap-hole.  In the ~13 years since I've since gotten married, lived a few different places and replaced almost every other possession at least once.  But that mixer is on my counter at home and I'm confident it will still be there ready to kneed dough or whip up a merringue at a moment's notice.

You don't always get what you pay for, but sometimes the more expensive stuff really is better.
 
2013-06-20 10:11:38 AM
2nd order simulacra?
 
2013-06-20 10:22:33 AM

Parkanzky: When I was in grad school I bought a crappy duplex in a terrible neighborhood.  I worked in a bakery all through high school and college, so I wanted a nice mixer and did a bunch of research and got a 'good' KitchenAid. I wanted a bowl lift instead of the tilt head and made sure to get one with metal gears and such.  I trolled sales flyers and finally found a killer deal for the good model at a discount store.  It still represented a huge purchase for me.

It turned out to be the nicest thing in that crap-hole.  In the ~13 years since I've since gotten married, lived a few different places and replaced almost every other possession at least once.  But that mixer is on my counter at home and I'm confident it will still be there ready to kneed dough or whip up a merringue at a moment's notice.

You don't always get what you pay for, but sometimes the more expensive stuff really is better.


truth. even with the supposed drop in quality mentioned in this thread, there is NOTHING in the way of made-for-household-use mixers like a kitchenaid. the cuisenart my wife had didn't even compare to the style, power, and heft of the kitchenaid (it's better not to have a mixer that's easily moved)
 
2013-06-20 11:17:48 AM

Benevolent Misanthrope: UsikFark: illannoyin: 'Foodie wannabes'? You mean people who like food but are too poor to afford artisan foods but would like to?

It's like designer imposter perfume that you can eat.

It's called brand aspiration. Kitchenaid makes good stuff, right? So a company like Kitchenaid produces a couple items that are only sold at Kmart and Target so they can get a slice of lower-income purchasers who don't have $300 for a mixer but might have $20 for a can opener. Likewise, a company that makes $400-1000 purses can sell $60 sunglasses with a huge logo on the temples.
/has a new Kitchenaid manual can opener that is rusting through the chrome finish

Don't be farkin' dissin' on my KitchenAid, mofo.  I will CUT you.


My last three can openers have stripped the gears so they just spin instead of opening the Goddamn can. Why do you have plastic gears?? Fark you KitchenAid!
I've been using a P-38 for the last year for all my can opening needs.
 
2013-06-20 11:32:32 AM

hlehmann: The gears in the mixers used to be made of metal; now they're made of plastic.


It might be more than intial manufacturing cost savings.  Just speculation, but, a set of plastic gears, depending on the type of plastic and mode of manufacturing, would give the motor a easy point to fail.  The gear would break before you could damage the motor.  A metal gear might not break before damaging the engines.  Replacing a gear is a lot better than replacing the entire motor.

Does anyone know what kind of warranty the plastic geared mixers have?
 
2013-06-20 11:43:11 AM
To answer a question above, Kitchenaid is now owned by Whirlpool.
 
2013-06-20 12:06:25 PM

ggecko: What's next?????

[i.imgur.com image 850x1133]


Dude, that's totally NSFW. Even though it's not what it looks like, it's what it looks like that counts. LOL
 
2013-06-20 01:05:16 PM

manimal2878: And probably each year, GE and Kitchen aid having a bidding contest to see which group of Chinese children will actually make their product.


GE actually makes a lot of its products in the USA.   I recall a story about a year ago where they stated for some products it is cheaper in the early to mid-life cycle to manufacture in the USA because of the more direct input the workers and engineers can have on improving costly/inefficient designs and manufacturing procedures.  Specifically, their new water heaters were brought back to the USA after several costly years being manufactured overseas.  If they were still being made in China (or whereever) those cost-savings and design improvements wouldn't have happened due to the difficultly communicating and negotiating with multiple foreign factories.
 
2013-06-20 01:23:34 PM
I was wondering about this in regards to Trader Joe's home style flour tortillas. They are all different shapes. I was thinking they have a machine that makes them in imperfect shapes to make them look home made.
 
2013-06-20 02:14:21 PM

Chainsaw Turd Elf: I was wondering about this in regards to Trader Joe's home style flour tortillas. They are all different shapes. I was thinking they have a machine that makes them in imperfect shapes to make them look home made.


interesting. i assume these prepackaged torillas, not some you can pick up at the bakery counter? i was in our super ginormous kroger yesterday in north ft worth, and i noticed they have a tortilleria in-house making fresh flour and corn tortillas, and doing things like cinnamon and sugar tortillas. next time i'll have to try some.
 
2013-06-20 02:48:15 PM
On the kitchenaide home mixers. I have two from when Hobart owned the company. They claim that the plastic gear (singular) in the newer models are to protect the motor from burning out. The gear strips, has to be replaced, but no further damage happens. At least that is the spin. Sorta like "Corning" or whomever they are called on the consumer side changing the borosilicate formulation in the states to be cheaper, but keeping the older and better formulation in Europe.
 
2013-06-20 02:52:18 PM
Hey, no hate on Hillshire. I could live (briefly before having a fat induced heart attack) on their cheddar wurst.
I can get great and awesome brats living in Wisconsin, but there is something about the chemical cheese and cheap animal parts in their cheddar wurst that I love.
 
2013-06-20 03:55:54 PM
I only eat all un-natural, inorganic food. No Angus for me, I prefer retired dairy cow Guernsey. Cheese Whiz out of a can, instead of Vermont Cheddar. One molecule away from plastic margarine, instead of butter. Cheap dollar store bologna or hot dogs, on white bread hot dog buns, with whatever's on sale yellow mustard. I eat good, and my large puss gut stomach proves it.
 
2013-06-20 04:09:34 PM

MythDragon: My last three can openers have stripped the gears so they just spin instead of opening the Goddamn can. Why do you have plastic gears?? Fark you KitchenAid!



You need on of these swing-a-way can openers. They're seven bucks on Amazon and I'm still using the one that I took to college 29 years ago.
img.fark.net
 
2013-06-20 04:53:51 PM

Fear the Clam: MythDragon: My last three can openers have stripped the gears so they just spin instead of opening the Goddamn can. Why do you have plastic gears?? Fark you KitchenAid!


You need on of these swing-a-way can openers. They're seven bucks on Amazon and I'm still using the one that I took to college 29 years ago.
[img.fark.net image 435x450]


BANG
 
2013-06-20 04:58:03 PM
Lab-crafted meat...why does that sound so familiar?
 

Speaking of food, should foods containing GMO's be allowed to be labelled "all-natural"?
 
2013-06-20 05:30:02 PM

DrBrownCow: xria: They would be packaging the product in some budget supermarket Ice Cream boxes, then once those were done a load of premium brand Ice Cream (which were the actual owners of the factory), and then some mid-brand cartons. Nothing during the process actually changed apart from the labels on the packaging.

You know, I've heard this claim many times about food, and I'm even sympathetic to the idea that it's true, but I've been grocery shopping for a couple of decades and have tried a lot of different products and I just don't see (or taste) the evidence that the practice is at all widespread.  Perhaps the less expensive repackaged brands are kept out of same stores/regions that also carry the premium product and therefore I've never ran into two ice creams (or whatever food) being exactly the same with different labels and price points.   People say this all the time about store brands and generics, but I've yet to taste a store brand that was exactly the same as any of the name brand products in the same store.  We prefer some of the store brands, actually.

Now, when it comes to appliances and electronics, one can clearly see nearly identical products with different brand names.   One just needs to order a replacement part.


You would not notice that 'sameness' unless you had those products in front and tested them blindly all at the same time without packaging. I worked for 2 quality control labs (one independent, one large supermarket one)...

What the other poster said is true... One ice cream maker will make their own brand and then put up the same ice cream in store brand labels. Dairy products like milk as well... Check the plant codes among store and big label milk... See if they are the same. It's usually a couple of letters/numbers hyphenated with several additional numbers. If they're the same one is putting the other up. One supermarket dairy used to put up the big name in my area in their stores... So people paid the extra 50 or 75 cent premium for a name label.

Certainly buy things if they taste or perform better, but always try out a comparable store brand of the same level of quality...
 
2013-06-20 05:33:12 PM

bungle_jr: Chainsaw Turd Elf: I was wondering about this in regards to Trader Joe's home style flour tortillas. They are all different shapes. I was thinking they have a machine that makes them in imperfect shapes to make them look home made.

interesting. i assume these prepackaged torillas, not some you can pick up at the bakery counter? i was in our super ginormous kroger yesterday in north ft worth, and i noticed they have a tortilleria in-house making fresh flour and corn tortillas, and doing things like cinnamon and sugar tortillas. next time i'll have to try some.


Both HEB and Kroger will have fresh tortillas in their stores in Texas. One of the things I miss having just moved from Houston/Galveston to Detroit.

Some suggestions:
Stick with the plain flour or corn types. Avoid the butter ones. The cayenne ones can be hit or miss.

Be careful if they are still hot from the store. Open the bag and let dry a bit before refrigeration.

They are easily toasted using a dry pan.

The microwave can be used for quick tortilla cheese rollups.

The flour tortillas need to be toasted just shy of stiff for enchiladas, the corn need just a slight toasting.

The flour tortillas make for awesome grilled quesodillas. Load them up with grilled chicken or beef, some asadero cheese and a little pico (not salsa) and then grill them crispy. These are awesome.

Disclaimer: The above hints are for the fresh tortilla stands at the HEB/Kroger stores.Homemade,refrigerated manufactured or dry stored manufactured tortillas may act differently.
 
2013-06-20 05:44:47 PM

cardex: cyberspacedout: fusillade762: It's one reason why Wendy's softened the edges of its famously square hamburger patties. The Dublin, Ohio-based company says it changed the patty to a "natural square" with wavy edges because tasters said the straight edges looked processed.

Who the fark cares how their hamburger is shaped?

I'm wondering how anyone can think a hamburger *doesn't* look processed.

By sticking your head in the bulls ass ? Or was that a t bone


Wait.  It's gotta be your bull.

/Love that movie.
 
2013-06-20 07:43:48 PM
Available for angry comments on multinational companies attempting to pretend that they use real ingredients in their products...

www.takepart.com

/"Well what a surprise, a trust fund Hipster talking out of his ass!"
//"Well let me help you out, 'Spencer' or 'Linus' or whatever the fark your name is!"
 
2013-06-20 08:37:27 PM

ch13fwiggum: You would not notice that 'sameness' unless you had those products in front and tested them blindly all at the same time without packaging. I worked for 2 quality control labs (one independent, one large supermarket one)...

What the other poster said is true... One ice cream maker will make their own brand and then put up the same ice cream in store brand labels. Dairy products like milk as well... Check the plant codes among store and big label milk... See if they are the same. It's usually a couple of letters/numbers hyphenated with several additional numbers. If they're the same one is putting the other up.


At least three people have made this claim in this thread, but not a single specific example has been given.   Again, I'm open to the idea, but just because two products come out of the same "food factory" doesn't mean they don't change the specs/ingredients for certain batches.    Like I said above, if it is happening,my guess is that those same two products very rarely end up in the same store.
 
2013-06-21 12:43:10 AM

DrBrownCow: ch13fwiggum: You would not notice that 'sameness' unless you had those products in front and tested them blindly all at the same time without packaging. I worked for 2 quality control labs (one independent, one large supermarket one)...

What the other poster said is true... One ice cream maker will make their own brand and then put up the same ice cream in store brand labels. Dairy products like milk as well... Check the plant codes among store and big label milk... See if they are the same. It's usually a couple of letters/numbers hyphenated with several additional numbers. If they're the same one is putting the other up.

At least three people have made this claim in this thread, but not a single specific example has been given.   Again, I'm open to the idea, but just because two products come out of the same "food factory" doesn't mean they don't change the specs/ingredients for certain batches.    Like I said above, if it is happening,my guess is that those same two products very rarely end up in the same store.


Wow, take off the blinders. It's called the illusion of choice.  Learn it, live it.

I know for a fact that store brand canned food is made in the same lines as the name brand.  You're paying for the name.
 
2013-06-21 03:53:59 AM
Vaneshi

All were labor intensive to make.

Yep as they were probably designed to be cooked/baked by either a baker or your stay at home wife.

A lof of this 'foodie' stuff I see being derided is basically: How to get a housewife cooked meal, when you don't have a housewife... because she's busy working her ass off same as you.


I make pirogues, based on the original recipe from 'the old country', handed down to my Mom from my fathers grandmother, who couldn't speak English.

We don't make them normal size, meaning about 2 inches in width, but larger, up to 4. We'll usually make and cook 30 to 40, then wrap and freeze them in bunches.

They taste absolutely nothing like the ones you buy in a box in a grocery store.

I have to clear everything for the day when making them because the process means hours of standing, kneading dough, rolling it out, making the fillings, boiling in huge pots of water, stacking them to cool and then packaging them. The clean up is a mess and takes awhile.

However, they are delicious when fried in real butter, a little salt added and wonderfully chewy. The dough is basically noodle dough. The fillings vary from mashed potatoes and bacon to seasoned hamburger, cheese and more. Usually an average adult can eat three to four at a sitting.

It's so time consuming that I'm usually reluctant to start. Especially if I have no help. After I make a batch, suddenly my siblings appear out of the woodwork, begging for some.

If I start at 9 in the morning, I'm finished by around 3 pm, including cleanup.

I've had scratch made cakes before and found them heavy as lead, not as sweet as today's, often more filling and they take three times as long to make. However, the home made frosting, made by someone who knows what they're doing, makes every commercial version suck. Especially frostings used in grocery store bakeries from Company recipes or shipped in buckets. I'd almost kill for a good, home made butter cream frosting like I used to get when we had a hands on bakery in town. They got run out of business by the cheaper cakes, pastries and bread churned out by the chain grocery bakeries.

I can't make frosting worth shiat.
 
2013-06-21 07:48:57 AM

Rik01: I'd almost kill for a good, home made butter cream frosting like I used to get when we had a hands on bakery in town.


Here's the butter cream frosting recipe that my Mom has been using for over fifty years. Give it a try, maybe it will be close to what you're looking for. I like it best with chocolate cake and it's pretty good to just eat with a spoon, too.

1 stick Imperial margarine
6 TBS Crisco
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
2/3 cup warm milk

Beat margarine and Crisco until blended. Add rest of ingredients. Beat until until sugar no longer feels granular. Mixture will appear curdled at first, but with beating will turn into smooth filling.
 
2013-06-21 12:40:04 PM

gadian: I think if you care more about how your food looks than how it tastes, you're doing it really wrong.  Unless it looks like vomit.  I've been to a lot of fancy diners where people insist on serving vomit.  That helps no one.  For the record, anything with bits of tofu or couscous looks like vomit.


Yeah I am pretty sure that you  just invalidated your own point.
You probably put ketchup on your hot dogs.
 
2013-06-21 03:21:29 PM

greggm59: Rik01: I'd almost kill for a good, home made butter cream frosting like I used to get when we had a hands on bakery in town.

Here's the butter cream frosting recipe that my Mom has been using for over fifty years. Give it a try, maybe it will be close to what you're looking for. I like it best with chocolate cake and it's pretty good to just eat with a spoon, too.

1 stick Imperial margarine
6 TBS Crisco
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
2/3 cup warm milk

Beat margarine and Crisco until blended. Add rest of ingredients. Beat until until sugar no longer feels granular. Mixture will appear curdled at first, but with beating will turn into smooth filling.


IMHO all frosting should be made with powdered sugar.
 
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