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(CBS News)   "When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?"   (cbsnews.com) divider line 332
    More: Stupid, Taliban, virus  
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8874 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jun 2013 at 1:59 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



332 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-06-19 09:09:20 AM
A very nice young man who worked for me used to have a little trouble getting in on time. Like, every day. Once a week I would say, "Look, you really have to be at your desk at 10 o'clock." Did he say, "Sorry, I'll try to do better?"

No. He would just smile and say, "No problem."

That nice young man does not work for me anymore.

So wait, the guy was fired for saying "no problem" or because he was always late?

/author of TFA better never visit Australia, lest he discover "no worries"
 
2013-06-19 09:12:18 AM
I prefer "No worries" to either. As far as "No problem" goes, I think it goes back to Ah-nold in Terminator 2.
 
2013-06-19 09:19:02 AM
No problemo.

/This bugs the shiat out of me too. Get off my lawn.
 
2013-06-19 09:19:48 AM
People who have a problem with "no problem" should be thankful that they don't have bigger things to worry about.
 
2013-06-19 09:20:45 AM
SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

THIS IS AN OUTRAGE
 
2013-06-19 09:23:34 AM

Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.


The question is whether its polite at all.  I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.

/Canadian
//we're funny like that
 
2013-06-19 09:25:01 AM
I blame the French.
 
2013-06-19 09:25:53 AM
"screw you, cloud!"
 
2013-06-19 09:28:12 AM
De nada
 
2013-06-19 09:31:40 AM
I'm a pre-1980 person, but "no problem" doesn't, and has never, bothered me in the slightest.

I will say, however, that when I first started hearing "You're good," it rubbed me the wrong way: "Oh, I'm sorry. I'll get out of your way." "No, you're good." Grrr. But I've long ago gotten over it. Whatever.
 
2013-06-19 09:33:58 AM

Secret Agent X23: I'm a pre-1980 person, but "no problem" doesn't, and has never, bothered me in the slightest.

I will say, however, that when I first started hearing "You're good," it rubbed me the wrong way: "Oh, I'm sorry. I'll get out of your way." "No, you're good." Grrr. But I've long ago gotten over it. Whatever.


What about "it's all good"?  Really?  All of it?  Every bit of it is good?
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2013-06-19 09:35:26 AM
Someone should wish him "Happy Holidays" and watch him go postal.
 
2013-06-19 09:41:44 AM

unyon: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

The question is whether its polite at all.  I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.

/Canadian
//we're funny like that


Perhaps, but I really don't think it's worth getting riled up about.
 
2013-06-19 09:43:38 AM
 Luckily, my wife gave me a look that said, "Don't start."

So your wife is tired of hearing your shiat so you brought your pointless rant to the internet.
 
2013-06-19 09:45:46 AM
FFS! No Problem!
 
2013-06-19 09:46:47 AM
When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?

Listen, today's young people: If you want to infuriate someone born before 1980, just keep telling him "No problem" when they ask you to do something that is most certainly NOT a problem.


I don't understand how these two things are related. The first is a different response to being thanked, the second is affirmation that you understand the instruction and are willing to do as asked. I find it hard to believe that an author would be so enraged by colloquial English niceties that may have drifted past their origins and are no longer meant literally. Does this person expect to be peppered with an inventory of things that exist over the head of the person that he may say "What's up?" to? Of course not, because who walks around with pepper in their pockets all the time?
 
2013-06-19 09:51:37 AM

serial_crusher: What about "it's all good"? Really? All of it? Every bit of it is good?


For some reason not related to anything specific I remember ever seeing, that one always gives me a mental image of Tommy Chong in an incredibly thick cloud of whatever it is he might be smoking, in a state of mind just barely connected to reality well enough for him to realize someone else is there, and he's saying it but you're not sure exactly what he's referring to. "It's all goooooood, man..."
 
2013-06-19 09:53:11 AM
Why do we thank people for providing service for pay anyway? They should be thanking us for the money.
 
2013-06-19 09:58:10 AM
I thought Andy Rooney was dead.
 
2013-06-19 10:00:24 AM
'My bad'
 
2013-06-19 10:01:22 AM
I usually respond with 'yeah, whatever.'
 
2013-06-19 10:13:45 AM

Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

THIS IS AN OUTRAGE


Seriously. I mean, what does "You're welcome" even mean? I'm sure it has some noble roots, that used to go something like, "Thank you for letting me use your serfs," "You are welcome to use them anytime you need to, sir," but that doesn't even translate to what this guy wants, even the modern shorthand.

"Tap water, please."
"You're welcome."

That exchange makes no damn sense.


""Tap water, please."
"Here you go."
"Thank you."
"You're welcome."

*That* makes sense, but then again, so would replacing "You're welcome" with "No problem".
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-06-19 10:17:42 AM
Those young whipper snappers need to start talking like we did back in the day and then get off of my lawn!
 
2013-06-19 10:20:48 AM

Aarontology: Perhaps, but I really don't think it's worth getting riled up about.


I'm of the believe that shared civilization requires courtesy for humans to live in close quarters.  But then again, I've never been to New York.
 
2013-06-19 10:21:32 AM
I say 'no problem' all the time, as well as 'there you go'.

And there is dirt younger than me, so there.
 
2013-06-19 10:28:02 AM

unyon: I'm of the believe that shared civilization requires courtesy for humans to live in close quarters


Sure it does, but if I say "Uh huh," (or, "No problem," or, "Certainly,") to you instead of, "You're welcome," after you say to me, "Thank you," I am being polite. I meant it in the exact same way as you would have said, "You're welcome."

/How about if I say, "Bitte"?
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-06-19 10:31:02 AM
Gecko Gingrich:

/How about if I say, "Bitte"?

I usually say "Bite me".  That's like German for you're welcome, right?
 
2013-06-19 10:44:53 AM
I teach my kids to say "you're welcome."
 
2013-06-19 10:50:47 AM

unyon: The question is whether its polite at all. I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.


Just so I have this clear: You have a problem with the way a person responds to your thanks, a person who just moments ago did something for you that was worthy of your thanks. Do I have that right?
 
2013-06-19 10:51:40 AM
Whining about grammar on the internet. Truly we have achieved greatness in our society.
 
2013-06-19 10:54:02 AM
I think of "no problem" as more of a shorthand for "fulfilling your request was not a major inconvenience for me."  Which, by default, makes "You're welcome" more along the lines of, "I acknowledge your acknowledgement that what I did for you should make you feel grateful for my effort."
 
2013-06-19 11:09:43 AM

James!:  Luckily, my wife gave me a look that said, "Don't start."

So your wife is tired of hearing your shiat so you brought your pointless rant to the internet.


Bingo.  I like the tagline at the head of TFA too: A certain catch phrase is posing a problem for our contributor Bill Flanagan

More or less acknowledging exactly what you said.  Pointless rant on the internet.
 
2013-06-19 11:18:09 AM
I just wanted to say we've already done this one before.

/Pete
 
2013-06-19 12:39:14 PM
You'll get over it

/no problem
 
2013-06-19 12:42:30 PM
wow, people get this upset about this stuff? What about 'bro, no worries, and the ubiquitous z'up?

first world problems for sure.
 
2013-06-19 12:42:44 PM

Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

THIS IS AN OUTRAGE


I'm a "no worries" kind of guy.

/post-1980
//We say "Thank you" too much anyway
 
2013-06-19 02:01:40 PM
Shut the f*ck up and take your f*cking Cialis you old c*nts.
 
2013-06-19 02:01:45 PM
"No problem" means the same damn thing as "you're welcome". Let's focus on real issues, like people who misuse "anymore" and"begs the question".
 
2013-06-19 02:01:50 PM
And when the fnck did these whippersnappers start saying, "Thank you" instead of "Gramercy"?
 
2013-06-19 02:02:19 PM
No problem and "you're welcome" are no

fark it not wasting my time
 
2013-06-19 02:03:05 PM
When did "you're welcome" become an acceptable substitute for "with all pleasures, my lord?"
 
2013-06-19 02:03:25 PM
"Yup"

?
 
2013-06-19 02:03:30 PM

Gecko Gingrich: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

THIS IS AN OUTRAGE

Seriously. I mean, what does "You're welcome" even mean? I'm sure it has some noble roots, that used to go something like, "Thank you for letting me use your serfs," "You are welcome to use them anytime you need to, sir," but that doesn't even translate to what this guy wants, even the modern shorthand.

"Tap water, please."
"You're welcome."

That exchange makes no damn sense.


""Tap water, please."
"Here you go."
"Thank you."
"You're welcome."

*That* makes sense, but then again, so would replacing "You're welcome" with "No problem".


You live in a totally transcribed world.
 
2013-06-19 02:03:37 PM

unyon: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

The question is whether its polite at all.  I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.

/Canadian
//we're funny like that


When thanked, I often say, "Certainly."  Is that acceptable?
 
2013-06-19 02:03:38 PM
I also like "no worries", though it sounds kind of silly when anyone from the North American continent uses it.
 
2013-06-19 02:03:42 PM
Don't worry.

"No problem" is fast becoming "No worries"
 
2013-06-19 02:04:01 PM
It's sloppy and, despite being pre-1980, I'm guilty.
 
2013-06-19 02:04:50 PM
this doesn't bother me, but I said "no problem" so many times that I have gone back to "you're welcome" just to mix it up.
 
2013-06-19 02:05:03 PM
If people don't bend down and sniff my crotch while singing yellow submarine I know they really didn't mean 'you're welcome'.

Pointless and arbitrary custom is pointless and arbitrary.
 
2013-06-19 02:05:20 PM
 3.bp.blogspot.com

"Languages often evolve over time."
 
2013-06-19 02:05:24 PM
If I remember right, the phrase "no problemo" with a Spanish accent on the "problemo" was catching on first in the early 80s, which sort of evolved into the ubiquitous "no problem" that we have today. It might have been a movie quote at the time, but I'm not sure where it came from.
 
2013-06-19 02:05:55 PM
I blame this guy:

i301.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-19 02:06:16 PM
I'm saying "no problem" because I'm telling you "it was really not a big deal for me to help you, and I'm glad I could." But it's easier saying "no problem, man!" with a smile.

Nobody has ever complained about this. If someone does, they are offically a douche.

And the guy who wrote this, is as douchey as all get-out.
 
2013-06-19 02:06:17 PM
Like, you know, actually, It's like actually, you know, annoying, like you know, so I'll stop doing that, because, you know, it is what it is, I know, right? So, like actually, I'll stop. No problem. Oops. My bad.
 
2013-06-19 02:06:57 PM
For the record, I was born in 1974 and have been saying "No problem" instead of "You're Welcome" for the last 20 years or so.

So, the author needs to get over himself.
 
2013-06-19 02:07:17 PM
TFAuthor is 197 years old, apparently.

/You're too farking old! Get younger!!
 
2013-06-19 02:07:20 PM

Nabb1: I teach my kids to say "you're welcome."


Same, but it makes as much sense as "no problem", grammatically.

It begs the question: welcome to what? Your house? Your wealth? Your kids?
 
2013-06-19 02:07:21 PM

vudukungfu: Like, you know, actually, It's like actually, you know, annoying, like you know, so I'll stop doing that, because, you know, it is what it is, I know, right? So, like actually, I'll stop. No problem. Oops. My bad.


It's been real.
 
2013-06-19 02:07:37 PM
i.i.com.com

It's a nice try, Bill Flanagan, but you've got a long way to go before you can fill my shoes. Try thinking way too much about the price of things, that always gets me in a dander.
 
2013-06-19 02:07:38 PM
I don't like "You're Welcome" either.  I go with "My pleasure."
 
2013-06-19 02:07:49 PM
I see it as a natural progression from "Not at all", to "Not a problem", to "No problem"

It's "pas de probleme" in French, too.


 

Gecko Gingrich: I thought Andy Rooney was dead.


This
 
2013-06-19 02:08:15 PM

lewismarktwo: If people don't bend down and sniff my crotch while singing yellow submarine I know they really didn't mean 'you're welcome'.

Pointless and arbitrary custom is pointless and arbitrary.


Thank you, Good Will Hunting.  Here are some caramels for you.
 
2013-06-19 02:08:21 PM
Nae bother.
 
2013-06-19 02:08:24 PM
I have a tendency to reply to "How's it goin'?" with "It's goin'" and to "How you doin'?" with "I'm doin'".

/and it seems to be spreading to my coworkers
 
2013-06-19 02:08:45 PM
I love how the guy's wife says 'don't start', almost as if she already knows he's kind of an arsehole and puts up with it.
/thanks for putting up with my shiat honey
//no worries
 
2013-06-19 02:08:47 PM
Luckily, my wife gave me a look that said, "Don't start".

Here's some advice. Listen to your wife.

/no problem
 
2013-06-19 02:08:51 PM
I say "no problem" because it (whatever you're thanking me for) wasn't too hard for me to do, but that doesn't mean you're welcome to expect it (whatever you're thanking me for), as saying "you're welcome" implies.

No problem = it was not too hard, no big deal, etc...
 
2013-06-19 02:09:00 PM
I was born in 1962 and I have been saying that for as long as I can remember. This guy in TFA is a farking clown.

/he can get off MY lawn
 
2013-06-19 02:09:11 PM
cdn.taylorbrooks.org
 
2013-06-19 02:09:22 PM
And what's with the rap music these kids listen to nowadays? Give me some Glenn Miller any day, now THAT'S music!
 
2013-06-19 02:09:27 PM
No problem is better than the blank stare some people offer up.

/this is the least of my worries in life.
 
2013-06-19 02:09:36 PM
Could we PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE get rid of "Oh, you're fine" as the only answer to "Excuse me"?

I'm about to go off on the next person who's in my farking way and, when I ask to pass them with an "Excuse me" answers as if it were my fault in the first place.

/"I'm 'fine'? Well, isn't that nice of you, dear, but I'm afraid you're not my type, so take that elsewhere."
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-06-19 02:09:39 PM
images1.wikia.nocookie.net
inane.
 
2013-06-19 02:10:05 PM
I used to say, "Go Fark Yourself," to myself but it usually came out as, "Indeed!" (You get bonus points of you read that in John Lovitz's voice...)
 
2013-06-19 02:10:09 PM
At Chik-fil-a, they're required to say, "My pleasure" whenever you say, "Thank you."  My friend has considers it a challenge to get them to say, "My pleasure" as many times as he can each time we go.
 
2013-06-19 02:10:12 PM
Not a problem.
screencrave.com
 
2013-06-19 02:10:22 PM
I have also noticed that most of my coworkers between 24 and 35 have started saying "All right" instead of saying "Good bye."
 
2013-06-19 02:10:27 PM

Pants full of macaroni!!: I have a tendency to reply to "How's it goin'?" with "It's goin'" and to "How you doin'?" with "I'm doin'".


So do I. And then I invariably get "Just 'going'? Not going well?" or some similar idiocy. And then I invariably get stabby: I'm busy, and you don't actually care, so STFU already...
 
2013-06-19 02:11:20 PM
A very nice young man who worked for me used to have a little trouble getting in on time. Like, every day. Once a week I would say, "Look, you really have to be at your desk at 10 o'clock." Did he say, "Sorry, I'll try to do better?"

No. He would just smile and say, "No problem."



How the fark is that a substitute for "You're welcome?"

Author of TFA is a farking idiot.
 
2013-06-19 02:11:33 PM
Everyone has their stupid grammar peeves.  Not everyone writes inane articles about them.  Most people just post them in threads about the inane articles.

"I'm going to school to get my degree!"

Really, *YOUR* degree?  it's sitting there with your name on it right now?  oh it won't be printed until a few days before you graduate?  So you're really going to school to get *A* degree that you will have a claim for possession of after you have earned it?


Or even worse.

"I'm going to school to earn my degree!"

So you already have a degree that you somehow didn't earn but are now in the act of earning?

/hates marketing speak
 
2013-06-19 02:11:48 PM
Pretentious douchebags who opine on problems nobody else consideres a problem. Who does that without style or flair? Bill Flanagan?
 
2013-06-19 02:12:28 PM
My kid hasn't quite caught on to the fact that he's not the one who is supposed to say "You're welcome" after he says "thank you".  He says it as more of a "thank you're 'lcome". He's still more polite than many 30 somethings who don't say "thank you", "you're welcome" or even "no problem".  What, were you raised by wolves?   Social courtesy, please.
 
2013-06-19 02:12:36 PM

R.A.Danny: Why do we thank people for providing service for pay anyway? They should be thanking us for the money.


Nice troll, short, sweet, channeling just enough Reservoir Dogs without being a blatant ripoff. 8/10

In answer to your question, in case its not a troll, is that it is recognition that they just performed a service for you, even if you paid money for it. And that service was likely at a wage to them that was below its value to you.

/so good that I had to bite anyway.
//splash splash splash
 
2013-06-19 02:12:44 PM
Someone's got some sand in their....

I don't know why but I just remembered whose fault this is....


media.tumblr.com
 
2013-06-19 02:12:56 PM
I use both "no problem" and "no worries". Language evolves, get over yourself people who do have a problem.
 
2013-06-19 02:12:57 PM

Gecko Gingrich: I thought Andy Rooney was dead.


Boom.  Done.
 
2013-06-19 02:13:20 PM

unyon: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

The question is whether its polite at all.  I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.

/Canadian
//we're funny like that


What I find myself doing, and it irritates me that I do it, is saying "no, thank you."  Or something like that.

/also Canadian
 
2013-06-19 02:13:46 PM

James!: Luckily, my wife gave me a look that said, "Don't start."

So your wife is tired of hearing your shiat so you brought your pointless rant to the internet.


Thank god he took his rejection by an audience to mean he needed to spread his obnoxious rant to more people. Lord knows the internet is sorely lacking in idiots riled up about nonsense.
 
2013-06-19 02:13:48 PM
"No problem" is just another way of saying "Glad to help; no sweat off my back."  It shouldn't be offensive and is a kind reply if not as formal as "You're welcome."  What grinds my gears is when someone replies "Yep."  What does "Yep" mean?
 
2013-06-19 02:14:07 PM

show me: No problemo.

/This bugs the shiat out of me too. Get off my lawn.


Well, it should, because it's really supposed to be no problema. Also, do you get upset when someone says "de nada" to you?
 
2013-06-19 02:14:43 PM
If you want to get good tips or just generally not infuriate older people

That can be simplified:  if you want to get good tips, do not wait on older people.
 
2013-06-19 02:14:57 PM
De nada
 
2013-06-19 02:15:18 PM
"'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.
 
2013-06-19 02:15:23 PM

jayhawk88: [i.i.com.com image 300x225]

It's a nice try, Bill Flanagan, but you've got a long way to go before you can fill my shoes. Try thinking way too much about the price of things, that always gets me in a dander.


Ya know, if he'd been female, there's NO way "60 Minutes" would've let him appear on camera without some seriously deep grooming of those farking eyebrows. Ugh.

/If someone's too busy looking at your accoutrements for whatever reason, maybe you need better friends.
 
2013-06-19 02:15:25 PM
When someone thanks me for a little nicety I perform to make their day better, opening a door for instance, I rightfully acknowledge that they are acknowledging me.
I invoice them at $150/hr, quarter unit minimum.
 
2013-06-19 02:15:45 PM
And another thing, consarnit!  Why don't young people say "consarnit" anymore?
 
2013-06-19 02:15:49 PM
Bill Flanagan can go suck on some vinegary balls so far as I care. No problem.

That phrase has been used by people born prior to 1980, myself included, for quite some time. Bill Flanagan should make a great attempt to extract that giant stick from his turd cutter.
 
2013-06-19 02:16:02 PM
"Please" and "Thank You" are equally strange.

Please is a shorted version of "if it pleases the lord."   Which is what you said to a superior to do just about anything.  If it didn't please them, you very well didn't do it.    A lord might say "Thinking of you"  to someone of equal stature.  Which became "Thank You."

Why are we all running around using the formal replies of aristocracy anyway?
 
2013-06-19 02:16:21 PM
Subs and the Author should never work in the I/T field:  "np" "no problem" "no worries" "anytime" are all common terms. This "Your Welcome" you speak of what is that?

/Do the needful
 
2013-06-19 02:16:49 PM
Sometimes I will hold the door open for someone and when they say 'thank you' I'll respond with 'f*ck off!'.
 
2013-06-19 02:16:54 PM

ko_kyi: I go with "My pleasure."


That's usually where I go, too. But if you're going to split hairs to the extent of the author, then we shouldn't use it, either.

Is it really a pleasure to go fetch a customer a glass of water? No.  It's no more a pleasure for you to do it as it is a problem for you to do it.
 
2013-06-19 02:17:03 PM

FrancoFile: I see it as a natural progression from "Not at all", to "Not a problem", to "No problem"

It's "pas de probleme" in French, too.


 Gecko Gingrich: I thought Andy Rooney was dead.

This


All languages have multiple ways of expressing English's "You're welcome".

French formal: Je vous en prie --
French informal: De rien (it's nothing)

The Spanish informal is "de nada" (it's nothing)

We don't really say "it's nothing" often in the US but it isn't completely alien either. As far as people saying "no problem" I think as a culture we've accepted it as "de rien" even though it sounds even less formal than that.
 
2013-06-19 02:17:15 PM
I'm 30, but I distinctly remember being under 12 years old, and when people would thank me, I would usually say "no problem", instead of you're welcome.  I remember it was instinctive and I would always think to myself "that may have sounded rude, why didn't you say 'you're welcome'?"  But it's something I've done my whole life, and I really have no clue how it started.
 
2013-06-19 02:17:24 PM
Old guy pissed about the evolution of language? No problem! He'll be forced to retire by us 1980er's eventually.
 
2013-06-19 02:17:29 PM
In other news, regional dialects vary by region...
 
2013-06-19 02:17:52 PM
In spanish the correct response to "Gracias" (thank you) is "de nada" (it was nothing)
 
2013-06-19 02:17:57 PM

vpb: Those young whipper snappers need to start talking like we did back in the day and then get off of my lawn!


I called my own father-in-law "Sir."  Now my son-in-law calls me "Dude."  Which is ok by me.

/nobody calls me "Mr. Lebowski," man
 
2013-06-19 02:18:08 PM
And in other news
old people are old
frank stallone and more after matlock
 
2013-06-19 02:18:50 PM
The author of TFA, or "writer with a deadline & sand in his shorts who decided to post pointless, inflammatory rant to generate views & comments on CBS News, thus justifying his continued employment".
 
2013-06-19 02:19:03 PM

Gecko Gingrich: I thought Andy Rooney was dead.


Having read the piece, I know he is.
 
2013-06-19 02:19:10 PM
i am bringing back "groovy".

/ewj
 
2013-06-19 02:19:17 PM

ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.


Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?
 
2013-06-19 02:20:00 PM

exick: When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?

Listen, today's young people: If you want to infuriate someone born before 1980, just keep telling him "No problem" when they ask you to do something that is most certainly NOT a problem.

I don't understand how these two things are related. The first is a different response to being thanked, the second is affirmation that you understand the instruction and are willing to do as asked. I find it hard to believe that an author would be so enraged by colloquial English niceties that may have drifted past their origins and are no longer meant literally. Does this person expect to be peppered with an inventory of things that exist over the head of the person that he may say "What's up?" to? Of course not, because who walks around with pepper in their pockets all the time?


I think his issue maybe with the the subtle agency implied by the answer. "Ok" is simple acquiescence, "Yes sir" is deferential, but "No problem" implies that the person answering has thought about it and decided they were willing to do what you've asked them. Implicit in "no problem" is the chance they may find your demands to be a problem and not do them, and I guess this guy is one of those petty tyrants who finds the idea that those working for him might be making their own decisions independent of his will threatening. It's like people who get offended when someone uses "man" or "pal" instead of "sir" because they imply a position of equality.
 
2013-06-19 02:20:19 PM

unyon: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

The question is whether its polite at all.  I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.

/Canadian
//we're funny like that


And I would sometimes say that too "uh huh" or a "yep", instead of a you're welcome.  Not sure why I would say that as a child with no preconditioning, but it would come out.  I was just as sincere in my expression as if I were to have said "you're welcome", but it obviously doesn't come across as me being just as polite.
 
2013-06-19 02:20:46 PM

DemDave: ko_kyi: I go with "My pleasure."

That's usually where I go, too. But if you're going to split hairs to the extent of the author, then we shouldn't use it, either.

Is it really a pleasure to go fetch a customer a glass of water? No.  It's no more a pleasure for you to do it as it is a problem for you to do it.


It creeps me the f*ck out that Chick-fil-A employees are required to say this.
 
2013-06-19 02:20:47 PM
jpegy.com
 
2013-06-19 02:20:55 PM

Heron: I think his issue may be with the the subtle agency implied by the answer.


Bah. FTFM :/
 
2013-06-19 02:20:56 PM
When playing Baldur's Gate, I chose the male voice set who occasionally complied with commands by stating "Not a problem"; I developed the habit of using the same phrase myself. Perhaps I was unaware of the inherent rudeness of the phrase due to having it applied to a Paladin.
 
2013-06-19 02:21:37 PM
By Grabthar's hammer, by the suns of Warvan, it shall be done!
 
2013-06-19 02:21:39 PM
I was born before 1980, but that's no problem.
 
2013-06-19 02:21:48 PM
img.fark.net

.. reference may be too vague for those born after 1980
 
2013-06-19 02:22:09 PM
i use "you're welcome" when i deliberately approach somebody who needs help with something

i use "no problem" if somebody needed unexpected help
 
2013-06-19 02:22:33 PM

Honest Geologist: What I find myself doing, and it irritates me that I do it, is saying "no, thank you." Or something like that.

/also Canadian


Ah is that where it comes from? Figures.

I find unlearning the knee-jerk "sorry" is the hardest part of sounding American. It's like verbal wallpaper. You really don't notice you're doing it until someone points it out (repeatedly).
 
2013-06-19 02:22:55 PM
After 1980?  I was born in '72 and this has been a common phrase since my childhood.  As far as the phrase goes, I have no problem with it.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:02 PM

ferretman: 'My bad'


Yeah, the first time I heard this I realized I was getting older.

English 50 years from now will be very weird.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:17 PM

ko_kyi: I go with "My pleasure."



If I ever buy a boat, that's what I'm going to name it.

/Or maybe Frank Sobotka's Revenge.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-06-19 02:23:40 PM
when he goes to Pittsburgh and everyone says "Have a good one" he must go ballistic.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:40 PM

mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


Because women are equal to men.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:53 PM

Yogimus: In other news, regional dialects vary by region...


That doesn't stop people from complaining about "doing the needful".  I mean I get the complaints when it's used to inject ambiguity and reflect laziness on the part of the asker like "please advise" does, but it's still a retarded thing people feel excessively strongly about.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:53 PM
So what's the deal now?  Websites just look for other articles a few months back, shuffle the words around a little, and repeat them back?
 
2013-06-19 02:24:01 PM

UrukHaiGuyz: It creeps me the f*ck out that Chick-fil-A employees are required to say this.


It must have come about recently, for in my halcyon days as a high-school and college-aged youth working at a Chick-Fil-A, this never came up in the training and was never stressed by the managers or operator.
 
2013-06-19 02:24:10 PM

Rapmaster2000: If you want to get good tips or just generally not infuriate older people

That can be simplified:  if you want to get good tips, do not wait on older people.



THIS.

"O, here is a nice shiny new quarter."
Thanks.  Your drink cost $3 and your meal was $15, thanks for the 1.3% tip gramps.  You keep it, you might have to make a call using a 'phone booth' whatever the hell that is...
 
2013-06-19 02:24:16 PM
^ born in 1962.

*adjusts onion on belt*

I have no problem with no problem.  Never had a problem with no problem.

author is giving all us geezers a bad name
 
2013-06-19 02:24:56 PM

ferretman: 'My bad'


I see that Bob Knight is in the house.

How someone can take that phrase ("it was my fault") and believe it's the complete opposite is beyond me. Then again, he is seemingly turning into the quintessential angry old man.
 
2013-06-19 02:25:16 PM
What happens if I say it periodically to acquaintances and I was born before 1970 ???
 
2013-06-19 02:25:36 PM
Unlike many here, I appreciate how the response "no problem" can be offensive.

That is why I interchange it with "biatch, Please!"
 
2013-06-19 02:25:57 PM
"You're welcome" implies that you're welcome to impose upon me again.

"No problem" implies "this time, but don't make a habit of it."
 
2013-06-19 02:26:25 PM

mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


I'm pretty sure our society consideres "you guys" to be a gender-neutral phrase.
 
2013-06-19 02:26:50 PM

DirkNiggla: Rapmaster2000: If you want to get good tips or just generally not infuriate older people

That can be simplified:  if you want to get good tips, do not wait on older people.


THIS.

"O, here is a nice shiny new quarter."
Thanks.  Your drink cost $3 and your meal was $15, thanks for the 1.3% tip gramps.  You keep it, you might have to make a call using a 'phone booth' whatever the hell that is...


Your wages are a concern of you and your employer. Don't look to me to be a part of that.
 
2013-06-19 02:26:54 PM
I love how an EVP at MTV is concerned about a dumbed down generation of youth. Perhaps you should pay better attention to your programming content than worrying about modern vernacular.
 
2013-06-19 02:27:21 PM

mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


Because not everyone is as dependent on gender validation as you.

"Acknowledge my gender, working class peon, for it is all that matters in social interactionsI am here to be called female, not receive food."

alternatively

"I AM MY VAGINA!"
 
2013-06-19 02:28:00 PM

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: De nada


See? Pat Buchanan was right!
 
2013-06-19 02:28:38 PM

freeforever: "No problem" is just another way of saying "Glad to help; no sweat off my back."  It shouldn't be offensive and is a kind reply if not as formal as "You're welcome."  What grinds my gears is when someone replies "Yep."  What does "Yep" mean?


"Yep" is just another way of saying "Glad to help; no sweat off my back."  It shouldn't be offensive and is a kind reply if not as formal as "You're welcome."
 
2013-06-19 02:29:02 PM

NkThrasher: Everyone has their stupid grammar peeves.  Not everyone writes inane articles about them.  Most people just post them in threads about the inane articles.

"I'm going to school to get my degree!"

Really, *YOUR* degree?  it's sitting there with your name on it right now?  oh it won't be printed until a few days before you graduate?  So you're really going to school to get *A* degree that you will have a claim for possession of after you have earned it?

Or even worse.

"I'm going to school to earn my degree!"

So you already have a degree that you somehow didn't earn but are now in the act of earning?

/hates marketing speak


I believe you're actually incorrect on this. A degree is a rank or a title. A Diploma is what you receive granting you use of the title.This is why a degree is "conferred upon" you. Your diploma attests this specifically to you.  So earning "your" degree is correct.
 
2013-06-19 02:29:03 PM

SheltemDragon: R.A.Danny: Why do we thank people for providing service for pay anyway? They should be thanking us for the money.

Nice troll, short, sweet, channeling just enough Reservoir Dogs without being a blatant ripoff. 8/10

In answer to your question, in case its not a troll, is that it is recognition that they just performed a service for you, even if you paid money for it. And that service was likely at a wage to them that was below its value to you.

/so good that I had to bite anyway.
//splash splash splash


I still think that if someone does something for profit and I pay for it they should thank me. Is that all that old fashioned? That goes for the pretty young lady at Starbucks to my Cisco rep who just got a $235,000 PO from me.
 
2013-06-19 02:29:18 PM
www.peolpstar.com
 
2013-06-19 02:29:23 PM
No worries.

What are you fakring Austrian?  Throw another shrimp on the barbie!  No Worries, mate.
 
2013-06-19 02:29:39 PM

jbc: Someone should wish him "Happy Holidays" and watch him go postal.


The jews started that one.
 
2013-06-19 02:29:50 PM
I was born in 1955 and I have no problem with it. Subby should ease up on his grammatical OCD.
 
2013-06-19 02:30:17 PM
What I say instead:

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-06-19 02:30:28 PM

Airportmatt: For the record, I was born in 1974 and have been saying "No problem" instead of "You're Welcome" for the last 20 years or so.

So, the author needs to get over himself.


I was born in 1972, and I say it a lot as well. Although I think I say "no worries" more than anything. I picked that up from a former coworker, and it just stuck.
 
2013-06-19 02:30:59 PM

Fuggin Bizzy: Pants full of macaroni!!: I have a tendency to reply to "How's it goin'?" with "It's goin'" and to "How you doin'?" with "I'm doin'".

So do I. And then I invariably get "Just 'going'? Not going well?" or some similar idiocy. And then I invariably get stabby: I'm busy, and you don't actually care, so STFU already...


One summer I was doing some filing in an office that had a couple salesweasels in addition to the usual staff. One of them breezed in one day and said "Hey how're you?" and I, thinking myself quite clever, said, "Pretty terrible." I smiled at him smugly, waiting for him to realize how smart I was and how dumb his question was, and he said "Great!" and breezed out. He hadn't heard a thing I said. That took me down a couple pegs. :)
 
2013-06-19 02:31:01 PM
"ain't no thang." is how i roll.

<holds the door for a female colleague with a rather bodacious derriere>
"why, thank you, kind sir."
"ain't no thang."
 
2013-06-19 02:31:16 PM
This just happened to me.

Old Patron: "Thank you for all your help."
Me: "Oh, no problem.  Any time."
Old Patron: "Have a great day."
Me: "Thanks.  You too."

He didn't seem phased.
 
2013-06-19 02:32:05 PM

gadian: My kid hasn't quite caught on to the fact that he's not the one who is supposed to say "You're welcome" after he says "thank you".  He says it as more of a "thank you're 'lcome". He's still more polite than many 30 somethings who don't say "thank you", "you're welcome" or even "no problem".  What, were you raised by wolves?   Social courtesy, please.


Unfortunately, your kid is 23...
 
2013-06-19 02:32:09 PM
As they say at Chickfila: My pleasure!

Maybe we could use 'no problem', 'no worries' and so on informally and use 'you're welcome' formally?
 
2013-06-19 02:32:14 PM

NkThrasher: Everyone has their stupid grammar peeves.  ...


Mine is people who get all bent out of shape believing that words have distinct meanings.

I'm like, duuuuuuude, they're ALL MADE UP. GET OVER IT!

I remember noting back in 5th grade English, that there is nothing coherent in the rules about grammar or word usage. Every freakin' day was merely learning yet another exception to some "rule."
 
2013-06-19 02:32:23 PM
My grandpa who is 90 has always said "you bet" instead of "your welcome" for as long as I can remember.

/no a universal young person problem
//just a grammar nazi problem
 
2013-06-19 02:32:35 PM
img.fark.net
 
2013-06-19 02:32:59 PM

Gunny Highway: This just happened to me.

Old Patron: "Thank you for all your help."
Me: "Oh, no problem.  Any time."
Old Patron: "Have a great day."
Me: "Thanks.  You too."

He didn't seem phased.


Oh my, it's almost like this particular individual is a bad human being trying to blame a younger generation for everything, especially why he's a washed up old writer no one likes to read.
 
2013-06-19 02:33:00 PM
CBS news + biatching about "young" people ? Isn't Andy Rooney dead yet?
 
2013-06-19 02:33:11 PM

StandsWithAFist: The author of TFA,


"...and television executive."

NO WONDER!

/suck balls Flanagan
img.fark.net

img.fark.net
/hot like Flanagan's under collar
 
2013-06-19 02:33:35 PM
img.fark.net
'It's no problemo'
 
2013-06-19 02:33:58 PM

BarkingUnicorn: "You're welcome" implies that you're welcome to impose upon me again.

"No problem" implies "this time, but don't make a habit of it."


See what I mean? Opinion passed off as fact without the least bit of shame.
 
2013-06-19 02:34:11 PM
Listen you old fuddy duddy, why are you busting my chops , whats eating you ? No reason to snap your cap so pipe down. I'll be on the level with you, when I give you a drink and you tip the bill and say Thanks, I say no sweat or ducky ,  and how , now beat it
 
2013-06-19 02:34:27 PM

ikanreed: Yogimus: In other news, regional dialects vary by region...

That doesn't stop people from complaining about "doing the needful".  I mean I get the complaints when it's used to inject ambiguity and reflect laziness on the part of the asker like "please advise" does, but it's still a retarded thing people feel excessively strongly about.


I just take "do the needful" as request to go drop one in the pot.  Gives me an excuse to leave my desk for 1/2 an hour.
 
2013-06-19 02:34:48 PM

SoupJohnB: vpb: Those young whipper snappers need to start talking like we did back in the day and then get off of my lawn!

I called my own father-in-law "Sir."  Now my son-in-law calls me "Dude."  Which is ok by me.

/nobody calls me "Mr. Lebowski," man


Ha! My father-in-law told me in no uncertain terms to quit calling him "sir". I'm slowly getting used to it.

Slowly being the operative word.
 
2013-06-19 02:34:51 PM

R.A.Danny: I still think that if someone does something for profit and I pay for it they should thank me. Is that all that old fashioned? That goes for the pretty young lady at Starbucks to my Cisco rep who just got a $235,000 PO from me.


Cool. What'd you buy? Too cheap to be a switch, too expensive to be phones - does Cisco even sell phones? Ah, apparently they do. Weird.

/totally nosey
 
2013-06-19 02:34:53 PM

sboyle1020: Unfortunately, your kid is 23...


Boys develop slowly, okay?  Geez.  You sound just like my husband with his "don't you think he's old enough to chew his own food?".
 
2013-06-19 02:35:26 PM
csb time:

a few years back i was working the front desk at a local gym. as one of the guests left he told me to "have a nice day," to which i responded, "thanks--take it easy." the guy stops, turns to me and says something to the effect of, "THAT'S what's wrong with people today--why should I take it EASY? nothing comes easy, you have to work HARD for everything. I HATE it when people say that. You are all LAZY!"

/end csb
 
2013-06-19 02:35:52 PM

vbob: [img.fark.net image 351x469]

.. reference may be too vague for those born after 1980


The one he posted today was also very relevant to this editorial.  I think Plato had a rant similar to this guy at some point.
 
2013-06-19 02:35:54 PM

Heron: Implicit in "no problem" is the chance they may find your demands to be a problem and not do them, and I guess this guy is one of those petty tyrants who finds the idea that those working for him might be making their own decisions independent of his will threatening.


I think you've hit the nail on the head. "No problem" doesn't set the right tone of obeisance to your betters.

/   Born way before 1980
//  Have used "no problem" as far back as I can remember
/// Have no problem with others using it, either
 
2013-06-19 02:36:17 PM

Gecko Gingrich: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

THIS IS AN OUTRAGE

Seriously. I mean, what does "You're welcome" even mean? I'm sure it has some noble roots, that used to go something like, "Thank you for letting me use your serfs," "You are welcome to use them anytime you need to, sir," but that doesn't even translate to what this guy wants, even the modern shorthand.

"Tap water, please."
"You're welcome."

That exchange makes no damn sense.


""Tap water, please."
"Here you go."
"Thank you."
"You're welcome."

*That* makes sense, but then again, so would replacing "You're welcome" with "No problem".


"welcome" comes from Old English "wilcuma" which literally meant "one whose coming is in accord with another's will" or "one who's presence is chosen/a pleasure". The pieces of the word are cuma meaning "guest" or more literally "one who comes" and willa meaning "choice" or "desire; pleasure". So when this guy insists on "you're welcome" when you give him some water what he's insisting you say to him in the most literal sense is "I wanted you to come here". Less literally, he wants you to say "It was my choice/pleasure" which is little more than a more active construction of "I have no problem with with doing this".
 
2013-06-19 02:36:48 PM

gadian: sboyle1020: Unfortunately, your kid is 23...

Boys develop slowly, okay?  Geez.  You sound just like my husband with his "don't you think he's old enough to chew his own food?".



Haha...interestingly enough I just read an article that said males don't fully mature until they're 43, so he's got some time.

/true story
//32 for women
 
2013-06-19 02:36:50 PM

FTGodWin: BarkingUnicorn: "You're welcome" implies that you're welcome to impose upon me again.

"No problem" implies "this time, but don't make a habit of it."

See what I mean? Opinion passed off as fact without the least bit of shame.


There are no facts about this discussion.  It's all opinion.

I just grunt and glare at people  when they thank me.
 
2013-06-19 02:37:18 PM

huntercr: I believe you're actually incorrect on this. A degree is a rank or a title. A Diploma is what you receive granting you use of the title.This is why a degree is "conferred upon" you. Your diploma attests this specifically to you.  So earning "your" degree is correct.


It isn't something you can legitimately claim possession of until you have completed its requirements.  It isn't "yours".  It exists as an abstract concept or item ("A degree", "A diploma") until it is instantiated and given to you ("My degree", "My diploma").

Colleges don't offer "Your degree in X", they offer "Degrees in X", you are seeking one of those "Degrees in X", it isn't yours until you have completed the requirements the college has set forth for conferring it upon you, at that point of conferment it becomes 'Your degree in X', until then it is a degree in potentia, not a degree you possess.
 
2013-06-19 02:38:00 PM

StandsWithAFist: The author of TFA, or "writer with a deadline & sand in his shorts who decided to post pointless, inflammatory rant to generate views & comments on CBS News, thus justifying his continued employment".


Article created by an account named Flanagaw, too.
 
2013-06-19 02:38:29 PM

mama2tnt: Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


"Guys" has evolved to mean "people" in context-neutral situations. It's less formal than "ladies and gentlemen", and a little less sterile as just referring directly to a group as "people". You can't really say "guys and gals" unless you're wearing a cowboy hat.

As to your question directly, this practice is "okay" because informal language conventions are adopted by general consensus and usage. If this genuinely bothers you, I advise you to book a reasonably-priced flight to the burgeoning tourist destination of Okinawa, find a calm, peaceful spot along the famous cliffside, and hurl yourself to the rocks below.
 
2013-06-19 02:38:57 PM

sboyle1020: gadian: sboyle1020: Unfortunately, your kid is 23...

Boys develop slowly, okay?  Geez.  You sound just like my husband with his "don't you think he's old enough to chew his own food?".

Haha...interestingly enough I just read an article that said males don't fully mature until they're 43, so he's got some time.

/true story
//32 for women


Holy cow that makes me feel a lot better about my life. Thanks. I thought when I got smarter* in my early thirties that I must've been super-dumb and behind the curve.

*more able to plan ahead, stick to plans, be adult, etc.
 
2013-06-19 02:39:17 PM

The Martian Manhandler: What I say instead:

[25.media.tumblr.com image 500x273]


As you wish you, too *gazes longingly at internet stranger for sake of joke*
 
2013-06-19 02:39:57 PM
"No problem" should be used in response to the original request, not to the expression of gratitude.  It's short for "that shouldn't be a problem."


Can I have it fixed by tomorrow?
No problem.
(or)  That shouldn't be a problem.
Thank you.
You're welcome
.
 
2013-06-19 02:40:04 PM

Heron: Gecko Gingrich: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

THIS IS AN OUTRAGE

Seriously. I mean, what does "You're welcome" even mean? I'm sure it has some noble roots, that used to go something like, "Thank you for letting me use your serfs," "You are welcome to use them anytime you need to, sir," but that doesn't even translate to what this guy wants, even the modern shorthand.

"Tap water, please."
"You're welcome."

That exchange makes no damn sense.


""Tap water, please."
"Here you go."
"Thank you."
"You're welcome."

*That* makes sense, but then again, so would replacing "You're welcome" with "No problem".

"welcome" comes from Old English "wilcuma" which literally meant "one whose coming is in accord with another's will" or "one who's presence is chosen/a pleasure". The pieces of the word are cuma meaning "guest" or more literally "one who comes" and willa meaning "choice" or "desire; pleasure". So when this guy insists on "you're welcome" when you give him some water what he's insisting you say to him in the most literal sense is "I wanted you to come here". Less literally, he wants you to say "It was my choice/pleasure" which is little more than a more active construction of "I have no problem with with doing this".


Bah. FTFM. Again :/
 
2013-06-19 02:40:38 PM

gabethegoat: csb time:

a few years back i was working the front desk at a local gym. as one of the guests left he told me to "have a nice day," to which i responded, "thanks--take it easy." the guy stops, turns to me and says something to the effect of, "THAT'S what's wrong with people today--why should I take it EASY? nothing comes easy, you have to work HARD for everything. I HATE it when people say that. You are all LAZY!"

/end csb


He had to shower in 26 minutes...
 
2013-06-19 02:40:59 PM
Hey subs and author, have you taken into account that some people my take offense to "your welcome"  as they may take that a sarcasm or rudeness that the person offering it up is better then the person saying "thank you"?
 
2013-06-19 02:41:08 PM

Cythraul: I usually respond with 'yeah, whatever.'


This is my United States of Whatever
 
2013-06-19 02:42:05 PM

Aidan: R.A.Danny: I still think that if someone does something for profit and I pay for it they should thank me. Is that all that old fashioned? That goes for the pretty young lady at Starbucks to my Cisco rep who just got a $235,000 PO from me.

Cool. What'd you buy? Too cheap to be a switch, too expensive to be phones - does Cisco even sell phones? Ah, apparently they do. Weird.

/totally nosey


We are refreshing the switches and routers for some of our satellite offices.

So I'm paying about half for equipment and the rest for smartnet.

And we DO have Cisco phones.
 
2013-06-19 02:42:24 PM
I was born in 1960 and I certainly prefer "No Problem" rather than:
Silence
A grunt
"Yeah"
"ok"
A nod  (doesn't piss me off, but not my prefered response, unless they are a member of my fight club)
"sure"

So, yeah, no problem
 
2013-06-19 02:42:38 PM
"What do you mean?" he said. "Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on?"
 
2013-06-19 02:42:41 PM
I say "you're welcome," but have no problem with the evolution of language changing the way everyone else says it.

"Data" is singular these days. I got over that too.
 
2013-06-19 02:42:46 PM
"You are welcome" sounds utterly strange for non-English speaking people. It is something that you should answer when somebody says "Hello" to you.

/we say something like "nothing at all", short for "you need to thank nothing at all", or "gladly", short for "I gladly helped you"
 
2013-06-19 02:42:57 PM

Secret Agent X23: I'm a pre-1980 person, but "no problem" doesn't, and has never, bothered me in the slightest.


Same here.

Dear Mr. Flanagan,
         HAVE A NICE DAY, ASSHOLE!
                                                             Thank You,
                                                             ten foiled hats
 
2013-06-19 02:43:25 PM
I translated this article as: Get off my lawn!!!!
 
2013-06-19 02:43:47 PM

R.A.Danny: Aidan: R.A.Danny: I still think that if someone does something for profit and I pay for it they should thank me. Is that all that old fashioned? That goes for the pretty young lady at Starbucks to my Cisco rep who just got a $235,000 PO from me.

Cool. What'd you buy? Too cheap to be a switch, too expensive to be phones - does Cisco even sell phones? Ah, apparently they do. Weird.

/totally nosey

We are refreshing the switches and routers for some of our satellite offices.

So I'm paying about half for equipment and the rest for smartnet.

And we DO have Cisco phones.


Sweet! We never get new, so I'm all excited about someone elses' Christmases. :)
 
2013-06-19 02:43:49 PM

FTGodWin: NkThrasher: Everyone has their stupid grammar peeves.  ...

Mine is people who get all bent out of shape believing that words have distinct meanings.

I'm like, duuuuuuude, they're ALL MADE UP. GET OVER IT!

I remember noting back in 5th grade English, that there is nothing coherent in the rules about grammar or word usage. Every freakin' day was merely learning yet another exception to some "rule."


My fourth grade teacher would go off when people said "ain't". She would say, "That word is a contraction. Are you trying to say 'ai not'?"

It didn't occur to me at the time that the word "won't", by her logic, would mean "wo not". If I ever invent a time machine, my first priority will be to go back and deliver a nice zinger. Then may I'll go back and kill Hitler or something.
 
2013-06-19 02:44:14 PM

mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


Because there's no single syllable slang term for women? Or at least that socially acceptable or polite.
 
2013-06-19 02:44:21 PM
I'm glad the article was presented broken down into 5 parts, because I really can't handle more than 2 paragraphs at a time.
 
2013-06-19 02:44:42 PM
"Oh, by the way.....

img.photobucket.com"
 
2013-06-19 02:44:55 PM
Since people have become so touchy I just yell fark you as loud as I can to everyone.  I figure that's universal for "you're welcome."
 
2013-06-19 02:45:11 PM
Girl at drive through window: "Here's your order.  You have a nice one."
Me: "Uhhhm....Thanks.  I'm sure you do too."

(Always wanted to say it, never did)
 
2013-06-19 02:45:31 PM

BarkingUnicorn: FTGodWin: BarkingUnicorn: "You're welcome" implies that you're welcome to impose upon me again.

"No problem" implies "this time, but don't make a habit of it."

See what I mean? Opinion passed off as fact without the least bit of shame.

There are no facts about this discussion.  It's all opinion.

I just grunt and glare at people  when they thank me.


I hear that "Whateva" goes a long way.

It looks like CBS is running a senior special today. Here's one about dressing like a slob.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-3445_162-57585174/dressing-down-a-cultur e- for-refusing-to-dress-up/
 
2013-06-19 02:46:28 PM

Aidan: R.A.Danny: Aidan: R.A.Danny: I still think that if someone does something for profit and I pay for it they should thank me. Is that all that old fashioned? That goes for the pretty young lady at Starbucks to my Cisco rep who just got a $235,000 PO from me.

Cool. What'd you buy? Too cheap to be a switch, too expensive to be phones - does Cisco even sell phones? Ah, apparently they do. Weird.

/totally nosey

We are refreshing the switches and routers for some of our satellite offices.

So I'm paying about half for equipment and the rest for smartnet.

And we DO have Cisco phones.

Sweet! We never get new, so I'm all excited about someone elses' Christmases. :)


HAHAHAHA! We did a cost analysis of what a network failure actually costs us. We rarely get any grief about our budget anymore, especially because we really are very responsible about costs.
 
2013-06-19 02:48:33 PM

wallywam1: FTGodWin: NkThrasher: Everyone has their stupid grammar peeves.  ...

Mine is people who get all bent out of shape believing that words have distinct meanings.

I'm like, duuuuuuude, they're ALL MADE UP. GET OVER IT!

I remember noting back in 5th grade English, that there is nothing coherent in the rules about grammar or word usage. Every freakin' day was merely learning yet another exception to some "rule."

My fourth grade teacher would go off when people said "ain't". She would say, "That word is a contraction. Are you trying to say 'ai not'?"

It didn't occur to me at the time that the word "won't", by her logic, would mean "wo not". If I ever invent a time machine, my first priority will be to go back and deliver a nice zinger. Then may I'll go back and kill Hitler or something.


I was taught "ain't" was the contraction for "are not"  and "won't" was the contraction for "would not"...I did grow up in El Paso, TX so that may be why....
 
2013-06-19 02:48:42 PM

bglove25: mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?

Because there's no single syllable slang term for women? Or at least that socially acceptable or polite.


biatchez don't like "biatchez."
 
2013-06-19 02:48:57 PM

sboyle1020: Haha...interestingly enough I just read an article that said males don't fully mature until they're 43, so he's got some time.


That's good to hear since I'm a 41-year-old, man-child wondering when the hell I'll finally grow up. Sweet, two more years to f*ck off.
 
2013-06-19 02:49:32 PM

NkThrasher: It isn't "yours".


Neither do you own your mother or father. "Your" and "my" convey more than simple possession, as you wrongly imply.
 
2013-06-19 02:50:58 PM
"Obey and worship me, retail slave, for I am a member of the baby boomer generation, and we have absorbed all wealth.  Watch as a drape my excessive girth at this table, and use only the words I grant you permission to"

//Not actually taking part in my generation's collective poverty.
 
2013-06-19 02:53:00 PM

FTGodWin: bglove25: mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?

Because there's no single syllable slang term for women? Or at least that socially acceptable or polite.

biatchez don't like "biatchez."


and c units is just right out
 
2013-06-19 02:53:11 PM

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: De nada


That.  It's most likely appropriated from Mexican-dialect Spanish.
 
2013-06-19 02:53:13 PM

eas81: wallywam1: FTGodWin: NkThrasher: Everyone has their stupid grammar peeves.  ...

Mine is people who get all bent out of shape believing that words have distinct meanings.

I'm like, duuuuuuude, they're ALL MADE UP. GET OVER IT!

I remember noting back in 5th grade English, that there is nothing coherent in the rules about grammar or word usage. Every freakin' day was merely learning yet another exception to some "rule."

My fourth grade teacher would go off when people said "ain't". She would say, "That word is a contraction. Are you trying to say 'ai not'?"

It didn't occur to me at the time that the word "won't", by her logic, would mean "wo not". If I ever invent a time machine, my first priority will be to go back and deliver a nice zinger. Then may I'll go back and kill Hitler or something.

I was taught "ain't" was the contraction for "are not"  and "won't" was the contraction for "would not"...I did grow up in El Paso, TX so that may be why....


"Won't" = "will not."
/"Would not" becomes "wouldn't."
//At least, that's what this old lady was taught.
 
2013-06-19 02:53:36 PM

bglove25: FTGodWin: bglove25: mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?

Because there's no single syllable slang term for women? Or at least that socially acceptable or polite.

biatchez don't like "biatchez."

and c units is just right out


Layyyydeeeeeez... *waggling eyebrows*
 
2013-06-19 02:54:12 PM
img.fark.net
 
2013-06-19 02:54:17 PM

Land Ark: I have also noticed that most of my coworkers between 24 and 35 have started saying "All right"

aight instead of saying "Good bye."

/FTFY
 
2013-06-19 02:56:34 PM
I catch myself saying "no problem" a lot.  I was born in '78, and I grew up hearing a lot of people much older than myself saying "no problem" in lieu of "thank you".  I have...

img.fark.net

...no problem with that.

/YEEEEAAAAAAAHHHHH!!!
 
2013-06-19 02:56:35 PM

James F. Campbell: NkThrasher: It isn't "yours".

Neither do you own your mother or father. "Your" and "my" convey more than simple possession, as you wrongly imply.


You possess the relationship to them.  You aren't saying  that the person is your property when you speak of possession of a relationship.  You don't have possession of your job, but you do have possession of the relationship between you and your employer (another possessed relationship).

You have no relationship to that degree until you complete its requirements.  You have a relationship to a degree program "My program is X", you have a relationship with a professor "My professor of X is Y", you have no relationship to the degree you are seeking however.
 
2013-06-19 02:56:43 PM

Gecko Gingrich: I thought Andy Rooney was dead.


+1
 
2013-06-19 02:57:13 PM
If you have a problem with "no problem", then it's time to jump on the trolley, Charlie.
 
2013-06-19 02:57:38 PM
CBS: the network for old people.
 
2013-06-19 02:58:09 PM

Mr.Hawk: [img.fark.net image 300x300]



I LOL'd.
 
2013-06-19 02:59:26 PM
"No problem" just doesn't sound right to me if it's in response to someone thanking you for ordinary, expected service. If you've caused someone extra work, and they really don't mind, then I think "no problem" is appropriate.
 
2013-06-19 03:00:49 PM
Using 'no problem.'?

Ain't no thang bruh.
 
2013-06-19 03:00:56 PM
The culprit was Theo Huxtable. It comes from the classic scene in The Cosby Show pilot when Cliff teaches young Theo about money using Monopoly money. Theo keeps telling Cliff "No problem" when being told about how little money he would have as "regular people." Theo would continue to say "no problem" throughout the first season, Claire especially hated it.

It was Theo.
 
2013-06-19 03:01:18 PM
I prefer "Uh huh."

Thanks!
Uh huh.
 
2013-06-19 03:01:45 PM
What a douche.

/Born in the late 70s and have always said, "No Problem"
 
2013-06-19 03:02:22 PM

eas81: Subs and the Author should never work in the I/T field: "np" "no problem" "no worries" "anytime" are all common terms. This "Your Welcome" you speak of what is that?

/Do the needful


and yw, you're welcome, you are welcome are used in order of how much your request angered me.
 
2013-06-19 03:02:49 PM

frepnog: i am bringing back "groovy".


Peachy keen!
 
2013-06-19 03:04:27 PM

frepnog: i am bringing back "groovy".

/ewj


Really cool man.
 
2013-06-19 03:04:29 PM

Bell's Boy: I prefer "No worries" to either. As far as "No problem" goes, I think it goes back to Ah-nold in Terminator 2.


FTA:Saturday night, I took my wife to a good restaurant. The waitress asked if we wanted sparkling water, still water, or tap water. I said, "Tap water, please." She said, "No problem."

"No problem" dates back to 1963, and (as a response to being thanked)  is essentially the same construction as "It was nothing" or "Think nothing of it" (which dates back to the 1940s).  So much for his "born after 1980" nonsense.  It's a cooperative politeness strategy to help the person thanking you by retroactively minimizing the imposition of the request.

So in the example he gave, the waitress saying "no problem" was a negative politeness strategy to help him minimize imposition (or to reassure him that he had done so).

In short, the guy's wrong, he's lazy (because he could have Googled all this for himself in five minutes), and he wrote his diatribe because feels smugly superior to people about a topic he actually knows nothing.  Your typical Grammar Nazi, in other words.

tl;dr What's his Fark handle?
 
2013-06-19 03:04:59 PM

Andromeda: A very nice young man who worked for me used to have a little trouble getting in on time. Like, every day. Once a week I would say, "Look, you really have to be at your desk at 10 o'clock." Did he say, "Sorry, I'll try to do better?"

No. He would just smile and say, "No problem."

That nice young man does not work for me anymore.
So wait, the guy was fired for saying "no problem" or because he was always late?

/author of TFA better never visit Australia, lest he discover "no worries"


And whoever said that used 'like' as if she were a twelve year old girl. I don't know what's worse.
 
2013-06-19 03:06:48 PM
Meh, it all depends on the situation. In a casual environment "no problem" or "no worries" is usually ok. In a business environment or more formal situation, speak correctly. If I'm at some dive bar drinking $3.50 drafts and I get a "no problem" I haven't got an issue. If I'm at the bank and I get a flippant "no problem" I start to wonder what else they're being flippant about and are they screwing up my money.
 
2013-06-19 03:07:07 PM

I May Be Crazy But...: SoupJohnB: vpb: Those young whipper snappers need to start talking like we did back in the day and then get off of my lawn!

I called my own father-in-law "Sir."  Now my son-in-law calls me "Dude."  Which is ok by me.

/nobody calls me "Mr. Lebowski," man

Ha! My father-in-law told me in no uncertain terms to quit calling him "sir". I'm slowly getting used to it.

Slowly being the operative word.


Wise strategy.  I'll venture a guess that he wasn't playing bass in a band at a concert, and introduced to you offstage during a break.

/cool story, bro

/csb
 
2013-06-19 03:08:19 PM
Know how I know this guys hasn't had sex in years?
 
2013-06-19 03:09:28 PM

Secret Agent X23: I'm a pre-1980 person, but "no problem" doesn't, and has never, bothered me in the slightest.

I will say, however, that when I first started hearing "You're good," it rubbed me the wrong way: "Oh, I'm sorry. I'll get out of your way." "No, you're good." Grrr. But I've long ago gotten over it. Whatever.


What exactly is the problem with "You're good"?  Is it a question of an adverb versus an adjective (i.e., "You're fine" would be better?), does it merely seem to casual, is it because it's an Americanism, or is there some other issue?

Do you have the same objection to "I'm good" to mean "I don't need anything" or "No, thank you"?
 
2013-06-19 03:10:20 PM
Don't mention it, subby.

/all good
 
2013-06-19 03:10:23 PM
"Thank you" has become to be a contest of superiority at times(or maybe it was to start with, but that comes later, I'll explain it first).

Since X is doing what Y cannot or will not, Y is compelled to make up for that shortcoming by saying "Thanks", implying that X went way out of his way and did a lot of work at the bidding of Y.

The natural response to that is to say, "You're welcome, but it was no problem, you didn't put me out in the slightest." to equalize that power struggle.

The phrases go both ways, they're both good comforting manners and also a power struggle.

Most people are told to say please, thank you, and you're welcome, etc, but never really understand why, dont even know how to examine it.  It's a rule, so they follow it, and hence come up to have certain likes and dislikes, based on the arbitrary rules they're taught.

I never really understood the concept as it applies to our phrases til now, but it's very relevant to some far east cultures that practice humility as one-upsmanship.  The one serving the tea, or admitting to ignorance is the clear winner.

It's the clashing of different cultures really, where they believe the power is or are taught to place it.  Domination vs Subservience.

It worked for the far east especially because the common people see lords fighting to serve each other, and of course they are comforted that their entire lives are based on serving others, they're taught that there is nothing wrong with serving, so it is ok that they do it.  Really an interesting structure in that it can be very very stable over the ages, it does not beget conflict, and it inspires cleverness.
 
2013-06-19 03:13:56 PM

mama2tnt: Could we PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE get rid of "Oh, you're fine" as the only answer to "Excuse me"?

I'm about to go off on the next person who's in my farking way and, when I ask to pass them with an "Excuse me" answers as if it were my fault in the first place.

/"I'm 'fine'? Well, isn't that nice of you, dear, but I'm afraid you're not my type, so take that elsewhere."


You excuse yourself to others, they acknowledge your excuse by stating that it is not bothering them, and your response is to get mad at them? Why don't you try using appropriate language when you want someone else to do something, rather than excusing yourself?
 
2013-06-19 03:14:35 PM

unyon: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

The question is whether its polite at all. I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.

/Canadian
//we're funny like that


It's not,the question, actually. The question is why some people cannot accept that language and expressions change, and what's the bees knees now may just be a bunch of hokum later on.
 
2013-06-19 03:16:59 PM

exick: When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?

Listen, today's young people: If you want to infuriate someone born before 1980, just keep telling him "No problem" when they ask you to do something that is most certainly NOT a problem.

I don't understand how these two things are related. The first is a different response to being thanked, the second is affirmation that you understand the instruction and are willing to do as asked. I find it hard to believe that an author would be so enraged by colloquial English niceties that may have drifted past their origins and are no longer meant literally. Does this person expect to be peppered with an inventory of things that exist over the head of the person that he may say "What's up?" to? Of course not, because who walks around with pepper in their pockets all the time?



I THINK the issue, based on what he said in TFA, is that he THINKS when a person says "no problem" they're agreeing to do what he asked as if they had a choice and had made a decision.  As in the case with the waitress saying "no problem" he THINKS that response implies that she considered refusing, then decided it was a small enough matter that she would grudgingly accede.

And I can see, then, why he gets angry.  If you THOUGHT "no problem" was grudging agreement, that the person saying it was expressing resentment or reluctance ("I'm only agreeing to do what you asked because it was a small favor -- if you had asked for anything more, I would have said 'no'."), then yes, feeling angry or resentful when someone said "No problem" would make sense.

It would be totally wrong, of course, but it would be consistent with your mistaken assumption.
 
2013-06-19 03:18:18 PM
I find that "ain't no thing but a chicken wing" works well in most situations.
 
2013-06-19 03:20:43 PM
 It's like when people say "Bye" or "Goodbye" instead of the more historically proper, "God Be With Ye".  I farking hate that!! Totes.
 
2013-06-19 03:21:00 PM

R.A.Danny: Why do we thank people for providing service for pay anyway? They should be thanking us for the money.


Because it's a polite fiction that they aren't being nice to you MERELY because you are paying them money.  The social fiction is that you are two people being nice to each other because that's what nice, friendly people do when they meet.

I don't agree with Heinlein about much, but in this case I think he said it best:

Moving parts in rubbing contact require lubrication to avoid excessive wear. Honorifics and formal politeness provide lubrication where people rub together. Often the very young, the untravelled, the naive, the unsophisticated deplore these formalities as "empty," "meaningless," or "dishonest," and scorn to use them. No matter how "pure" their motives, they thereby throw sand into machinery that does not work too well at best.
 
2013-06-19 03:22:17 PM
If someone says "no problem" to me, I take that literally.
That means, to cite one of the examples, if you say "no problem" to lending me $10,000, then I will ask you for money again and again until you reply with something more plausible, like, "Well, it was a little strain on the budget, but you've been a great friend over the years, so I was happy to have the chance to help you out."
 
2013-06-19 03:22:55 PM

ciberido: Secret Agent X23: I'm a pre-1980 person, but "no problem" doesn't, and has never, bothered me in the slightest.

I will say, however, that when I first started hearing "You're good," it rubbed me the wrong way: "Oh, I'm sorry. I'll get out of your way." "No, you're good." Grrr. But I've long ago gotten over it. Whatever.

What exactly is the problem with "You're good"?  Is it a question of an adverb versus an adjective (i.e., "You're fine" would be better?), does it merely seem to casual, is it because it's an Americanism, or is there some other issue?


Well, as I said, it doesn't bother me anymore and hasn't for a long time. And just now I had to think about it for a couple of minutes to figure out exactly what bothered me about it back when it did. I think I took it as a sort of implication that if the other person had wanted or needed me to move out of the way (or whatever condition would have made "You're good" an unsuitable reply), it would have meant that I was somehow been "not good." That is to say, defective or something.

I'll point out, though, that I never wrote a farking article complaining about it.


Do you have the same objection to "I'm good" to mean "I don't need anything" or "No, thank you"?

No. Totally different, as you would probably infer from my above explanation.
 
2013-06-19 03:23:40 PM

Huck And Molly Ziegler: If someone says "no problem" to me, I take that literally.
That means, to cite one of the examples, if you say "no problem" to lending me $10,000, then I will ask you for money again and again until you reply with something more plausible, like, "Well, it was a little strain on the budget, but you've been a great friend over the years, so I was happy to have the chance to help you out."


Really?  That is how you would interpret "No problem" in that situation?  Really?
 
2013-06-19 03:25:56 PM

ciberido: Because it's a polite fiction that they aren't being nice to you MERELY because you are paying them money.


I don't think it is fiction at all. I think the flow of money dictates who gets thanked, and both parties should be happy with the transaction. I do not find saying "Thank you" to be a humbling experience, but an acknowledgement that they are happy with the transaction where they profited. As a customer, the supplier of said money (with a tip when appropriate) I do expect to have my side of the transaction acknowledged as well. It's just polite.
 
2013-06-19 03:27:50 PM

Gecko Gingrich: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

THIS IS AN OUTRAGE

Seriously. I mean, what does "You're welcome" even mean? I'm sure it has some noble roots, that used to go something like, "Thank you for letting me use your serfs," "You are welcome to use them anytime you need to, sir," but that doesn't even translate to what this guy wants, even the modern shorthand.

"Tap water, please."
"You're welcome."

That exchange makes no damn sense.



"You're welcome" as a response to "thank you" only dates back to 1907 and does indeed have the same root as "welcome" as a greeting.  But in both cases the important root is  willa "pleasure, desire, choice."  In all cases it originally meant something like "This happening is in accordance with my will."  Originally, it was conceptually the same as replying to "thank you" with "my pleasure."

I don't really know what you were supposed to say when someone thanked you prior to 1907, but if I had to guess "It was my pleasure" would probably have worked.
 
2013-06-19 03:29:29 PM

ciberido: I don't agree with Heinlein about much, but in this case I think he said it best:


My above statement was really meant to say that I agree, I just worded it poorly. I'm all for both parties enjoying doing business together as well, I will never look down on someone for working.
 
2013-06-19 03:32:26 PM

omeganuepsilon: Since X is doing what Y cannot or will not, Y is compelled to make up for that shortcoming by saying "Thanks", implying that X went way out of his way and did a lot of work at the bidding of Y.

The natural response to that is to say, "You're welcome, but it was no problem, you didn't put me out in the slightest." to equalize that power struggle.


That's pretty much what I came in to say - I'm guilty of the "no problem" reply, but as I think about it now, I really only do it as a gesture of humility when somebody seems overly grateful for something that really took no toll on me to provide, like giving away a piece of furniture that I was going to throw out anyway or something; subconsciously it's like I'm simply turning down a mistakenly awarded badge of kindness, not being dismissive of someone's gratitude.
 
2013-06-19 03:34:58 PM

FrancoFile: I see it as a natural progression from "Not at all", to "Not a problem", to "No problem"

It's "pas de probleme" in French, too.


 Gecko Gingrich: I thought Andy Rooney was dead.

This


IIRC, and this is going way back in the recesses of my brain, "il ne fait rien" is often used for "you're welcome," and loosely translates to, "it was no problem."  (literally, it does nothing).  Of course, that may just be the Quebecios way of saying it.  God, that class was over 20 years ago! :/

I know. CSB.

 But, yes, blame the French.  Googling it shows "pas de probleme" being one of the most common ways of saying "you're welcome."
 
2013-06-19 03:37:51 PM

Gecko Gingrich: unyon: I'm of the believe that shared civilization requires courtesy for humans to live in close quarters

Sure it does, but if I say "Uh huh," (or, "No problem," or, "Certainly,") to you instead of, "You're welcome," after you say to me, "Thank you," I am being polite. I meant it in the exact same way as you would have said, "You're welcome."



I used to get angry when people would type simply "ty" to mean "thank you."  It bothered me because of the lack of effort involved. I felt that, if a person couldn't be bothered to type out at least "thanks" or "thank you," then I'd rather they said nothing whatsoever.  "Ty" seemed less polite than complete silence.  I've gotten used to it and it doesn't bother me anymore, but I can relate to the principle.

In the same way, some people might see "uh hunh" (or maybe "no problem") as too casual, or requiring too little thought or effort, to be truly polite.  All I can really say to that is that manners are fluid: what is perfectly cromulent in one situation might be unacceptable in another.  Know your audience, if making the right impression concerns you.  But, really, that should go both ways: if the problem is, say, a young person talking to an older person who has a more old-fashioned concept of manners, then both sides should make an effort to meet in the middle.


/How about if I say, "Bitte"?

I'm not fluent in German but I would guess that "Bitte" is really just short for "Please don't mention it"  (the word "bitte" is literally "please," yes?).  That would make it just another variation on the "It was nothing" theme, which many European languages have.
 
2013-06-19 03:42:23 PM

RodneyToady: I think of "no problem" as more of a shorthand for "fulfilling your request was not a major inconvenience for me."  Which, by default, makes "You're welcome" more along the lines of, "I acknowledge your acknowledgement that what I did for you should make you feel grateful for my effort."


I don't entirely agree with you, but at the same time, there have been occasions where someone said "thank you" to me, I was about to say "you're welcome," and then decided to respond in some other way because it just felt like "you're welcome" might almost come across as saying "Yes, you SHOULD thank me, because it was a BIG DEAL."

At the time, I had never heard about negative politeness strategies so I couldn't really articulate why I felt that way.  I'm still not sure I'm using the terminology correctly.
 
2013-06-19 03:42:51 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Well, it should, because it's really supposed to be no problema. Also, do you get upset when someone says "de nada" to you?


This. In Spanish, problems are always women.

/What? They are. Don't give me that look.
 
2013-06-19 03:45:05 PM
I like to throw in a "don't even worry about it" every once in a while.
 
2013-06-19 03:45:52 PM

ciberido: I don't entirely agree with you, but at the same time, there have been occasions where someone said "thank you" to me, I was about to say "you're welcome," and then decided to respond in some other way because it just felt like "you're welcome" might almost come across as saying "Yes, you SHOULD thank me, because it was a BIG DEAL."


I say "Thank you" right back then tell them to have a great day, evening, life, whathaveyou.
 
2013-06-19 03:47:08 PM
I wish I had the free time that people who biatch about this obviously have. I'd find something better to do with it.
 
2013-06-19 03:47:21 PM

Shryke: Nabb1: I teach my kids to say "you're welcome."

Same, but it makes as much sense as "no problem", grammatically.

It begs the question: welcome to what? Your house? Your wealth? Your kids?


Forgive me for repeating something I already posted in the thread, but "you're welcome"  dates back to 1907 and the "wel" part of "welcome" comes from wila,  "pleasure, desire, choice."   So, at least originally, "You're welcome" (as a response to "thank you") and "It was my pleasure" mean (or meant) the exact same thing.
 
2013-06-19 03:50:19 PM
Ain't no skin off my azz...
 
2013-06-19 03:52:03 PM
How little is going on in your life for you to even think about this?

Or is it more like "oh crap, I need to turn in an article by tomorrow..."?
 
2013-06-19 03:53:17 PM
I do think "you're welcome" is more appropriate in a business context, but I wish it weren't, because it sounds weirdly sycophantic.  "Oh, you're welcome, sir!  Herp a derp!  I can hardly wait till you ask me to do something again!"

"No problem" sounds more to me like both parties are fairly indifferent to the transaction which is more the level I wish service were conducted upon, as opposed to the constant ego stroking that is expected now.

/Working in service for over 13 years
//Taking college courses to get out before I lose my marbles
 
2013-06-19 03:55:30 PM
This just in: Lexicons change over time. Don't get your wrinkly old ass in a pucker over it.
 
2013-06-19 03:56:21 PM
Why? Since you lost concept of informality as an overriding trend in the evolution of dialects and thus language as a whole in the context of this society

/mate
//cya later (but won't)
///not bad
 
2013-06-19 03:57:40 PM

Roja Herring: eas81: Subs and the Author should never work in the I/T field: "np" "no problem" "no worries" "anytime" are all common terms. This "Your Welcome" you speak of what is that?

/Do the needful

and yw, you're welcome, you are welcome are used in order of how much your request angered me.


Yes, forgot about that, and i find it funny that the offshore counterparts don't seem to understand the anger/sarcasm when we use those.
 
2013-06-19 04:00:16 PM
Among friends, mine is a casual "Yep."
 
2013-06-19 04:01:25 PM

unyon: The question is whether its polite at all.


The answer is yes.

"No problem" is an abbreviated form of "Performing this task for you presented no problem to me; it was my pleasure."
 
2013-06-19 04:03:10 PM

NkThrasher: huntercr: I believe you're actually incorrect on this. A degree is a rank or a title. A Diploma is what you receive granting you use of the title.This is why a degree is "conferred upon" you. Your diploma attests this specifically to you.  So earning "your" degree is correct.

It isn't something you can legitimately claim possession of until you have completed its requirements.  It isn't "yours".  It exists as an abstract concept or item ("A degree", "A diploma") until it is instantiated and given to you ("My degree", "My diploma").

Colleges don't offer "Your degree in X", they offer "Degrees in X", you are seeking one of those "Degrees in X", it isn't yours until you have completed the requirements the college has set forth for conferring it upon you, at that point of conferment it becomes 'Your degree in X', until then it is a degree
in potentia, not a degree you possess.


With respect, I think you are not seeing this because of the common assumption that a degree and a diploma mean the same thing. Linguistically there is much that overlaps between the terms...
"You were given a degree", and "you were given a diploma", are roughly the same in common speech,  yet they are not entirely interchangeable.

A degree is not a physical thing. It's not a piece of paper. A diploma is the thing. A degree is a title or award that is given to you by an authority. The diploma is written proof that you have received the title.

It is absolutely correct to say that a degree is "yours". And your issue with whether or not it's already been attained is silly. Yes of course colleges word it as "a degree" in xyz because their program is not for you alone, however conversely you are earning a degree for you alone.  A degree is awarded to the individual and is non transferable.  (It is fine for you to earn "a degree" , I am not saying one must use "your" here )

Do you also feel that when you go to a photographer, you must say you will have "a" picture taken instead of "your" picture until it has been given to you?
 
2013-06-19 04:03:16 PM

mama2tnt: Could we PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE get rid of "Oh, you're fine" as the only answer to "Excuse me"?

I'm about to go off on the next person who's in my farking way and, when I ask to pass them with an "Excuse me" answers as if it were my fault in the first place.


The problem with "Excuse me" in English is it means two entirely different things:

1. "I would like to ask a favor of you" (for example, if you want to get past someone and say "Excuse me" to get them to move out of your way, or allow you to brush past them without offense.  For comparison, Spanish uses "Con permiso" ("with your permission").

2. "I ask your pardon" when you actually did something WRONG, such as stepping on someone's foot by accident.  For comparison, Spanish uses "Discúlpame " ("Pardon me.)

To a non-native speaker these are two very distinct expressions and it seems quite odd than English uses "Excuse me" for both.

But I would guess that "You're fine" is in response to usage #1 and means something like "What you are asking permission for is such a minor matter there was no need to even ask."  Or to look at it another way, I would take "You're fine" to mean "I assure you that what you did (or were about to do) was in no way a problem for me."

They are using the expression correctly.  It's actually you who are at fault (if anybody is), because you could have said "Could you move, please?" if the question of whose "fault" the problem is really matters to you.  As a polite fiction, you CLAIMED (by using "excuse me" instead of "please move") that the fault was yours: don't get upset if they play along with YOUR fiction.
 
2013-06-19 04:05:10 PM

NkThrasher: huntercr: I believe you're actually incorrect on this. A degree is a rank or a title. A Diploma is what you receive granting you use of the title.This is why a degree is "conferred upon" you. Your diploma attests this specifically to you.  So earning "your" degree is correct.

It isn't something you can legitimately claim possession of until you have completed its requirements.  It isn't "yours".  It exists as an abstract concept or item ("A degree", "A diploma") until it is instantiated and given to you ("My degree", "My diploma").

Colleges don't offer "Your degree in X", they offer "Degrees in X", you are seeking one of those "Degrees in X", it isn't yours until you have completed the requirements the college has set forth for conferring it upon you, at that point of conferment it becomes 'Your degree in X', until then it is a degree in potentia, not a degree you possess.


or...and stay with me on this...language is a malleable, flexible thing that does not conform to your rigid literal definitions. You want absolutes? Go do math.  Otherwise stay out of the language discussion.
 
2013-06-19 04:10:55 PM
People who get all nutty about grammer rules (intentionaly misspeling to drive them crazy) simply don't understand the purpose of language.  The goal is to communicate.  This guy knows exactly what they mean, he's just being a dick about how they say it.

Another thing he doesn't understand about language is that it changes.  We don't talk the same way they did when Shakespeare was writing stories, and we don't talk the same way we did when King James had the bible translated.  Language evolves.

/I was born well before 1980, and thinks the author is a dumbass despite his trying to pretend that everyone from before 1980 hates this and everyone after 1980 does it just to bug old fogeys like him.
 
2013-06-19 04:12:40 PM
serial_crusher:  What about "it's all good"?  Really?  All of it?  Every bit of it is good?

My grandson thought he was graduating HS, he failed out.
Me: "WTF son?"
Him: "It's all good"
Me: The fark it is, you hated high school, now you have to go to summer school!  What is up with that?
Him: "It's all good"

/yes he's a stoner
 
2013-06-19 04:15:12 PM
Not reading the bajillion comments, but surely I wasn't the only one to notice that TFA's author is actually complaining about people using "no problem" in place of lots of phrases that aren't "you're welcome?"

In fact, in that entire article, there's only one place where he decries the substitution: the response from thanking someone for doing their job. In which case, IMO, "no, thank YOU" is a more appropriate response than "you're welcome."
 
2013-06-19 04:15:43 PM

NkThrasher: Everyone has their stupid grammar peeves.  Not everyone writes inane articles about them.  Most people just post them in threads about the inane articles.

"I'm going to school to get my degree!"

Really, *YOUR* degree?  it's sitting there with your name on it right now?  oh it won't be printed until a few days before you graduate?  So you're really going to school to get *A* degree that you will have a claim for possession of after you have earned it?


Or even worse.

"I'm going to school to earn my degree!"

So you already have a degree that you somehow didn't earn but are now in the act of earning?



Sorry, you're wrong here.

The genitive does not always indicate strict possession, but rather a general sense of belonging or close identification with.
     his train (as in "If Bob doesn't get to the station in ten minutes he's going to miss his train")
     Here, Bob most likely does not own the train and instead ''his train'' means ''the train Bob plans to travel on.''

However, if the idea interests you, I suggest the short story "Grammar Lesson" from The Draco Tavern by Larry Niven.  An alien race has a language in which "my hand" and "my brother" use different determiners in a manner which seems to be what you're driving at.
 
2013-06-19 04:22:11 PM

Mike Chewbacca: show me: No problemo.

/This bugs the shiat out of me too. Get off my lawn.

Well, it should, because it's really supposed to be no problema. Also, do you get upset when someone says "de nada" to you?


"No problema" is bad Spanish.  I don't think a native Spanish speaker ever actually says "no problema," though "No hay problema" is possible (but not common).

"No problemo" is an English expression that comes from farcical psuedo-Spanish.  It is based on the (hopefully tongue-in-cheek) misconception that every word in Spanish ends in the letter "O."  It was popularized in American culture by movies like Terminator 2 and tv shows like Alf.
 
2013-06-19 04:23:36 PM
Apparently, the author has a problem with the fact that we speak a living language as opposed to, say, Latin, which, being a long dead language, does not ever change, grow, or evolve over time. By definition, English--both American and the Queen's--means the colloquialisms change over time. Thus, "you're welcome" becomes "no problem" and "no problem" becomes "no worries" (which we shamelessly stole from the Australians--or at least, in some parts of the country, "no worries" is taking over for "no problem").

Perhaps he can find someone with a time machine, such as Doctor Who or Doc Brown, and go back to ancient Rome where Latin was spoken and then such things as evolving language won't bother him anymore. Until then, he should listen to his wife and STFU until some 16 year old rolls their eyes at him and says "whatever" or "same difference" (my two biggest pet peeves, and the pet peeves of many people over 35 that I know). Then he can rant, because then he will have a reason to.
 
2013-06-19 04:23:54 PM

huntercr: It is absolutely correct to say that a degree is "yours".


You're right, btw, just clarifying, or paraphrasing to bring another concept or perspective to the table. 

I've been trained to this level, this degree.

That is what a degree is, not a piece of paper, but a milestone.

My degree(of training), says I (should)know more than you about the topic.

A degree does not hang on the wall, the diploma that represents/certifies that it's been reached.  The checkered flag, as it were is representative that you crossed the finish line, you can't hang the finish line itself on your wall.(well, technically you could, but let's not spoil an otherwise awesome analogy)
 
2013-06-19 04:24:43 PM
I meant to say that by definition, English being a living language... bleh. Need coffee.
 
2013-06-19 04:26:42 PM

DarnoKonrad: "Please" and "Thank You" are equally strange.

Please is a shorted version of "if it pleases the lord."   Which is what you said to a superior to do just about anything.  If it didn't please them, you very well didn't do it.    A lord might say "Thinking of you"  to someone of equal stature.  Which became "Thank You."


Not exactly.  You're correct that "think" and "thank" spring from the same root.  But they separated about 1000 years ago, which is before constructions such as "Thinking of you" existed.
 
2013-06-19 04:29:44 PM
I was born in 1979, I say no problem because YOU AREN'T WELCOME
 
2013-06-19 04:32:32 PM
If you saw the original telecast on Sunday (as I did), the comments don't seem so arrogant or snotty. It was more tongue in cheek:

http://www.cbsnews .com/video/watch/?id=50147680n
 
2013-06-19 04:32:32 PM
I definitely remember "No Problem" being a catchphrase spoken by ALF in the 80's.
 
2013-06-19 04:38:45 PM

Aidan: Fuggin Bizzy: Pants full of macaroni!!: I have a tendency to reply to "How's it goin'?" with "It's goin'" and to "How you doin'?" with "I'm doin'".

So do I. And then I invariably get "Just 'going'? Not going well?" or some similar idiocy. And then I invariably get stabby: I'm busy, and you don't actually care, so STFU already...

One summer I was doing some filing in an office that had a couple salesweasels in addition to the usual staff. One of them breezed in one day and said "Hey how're you?" and I, thinking myself quite clever, said, "Pretty terrible." I smiled at him smugly, waiting for him to realize how smart I was and how dumb his question was, and he said "Great!" and breezed out. He hadn't heard a thing I said. That took me down a couple pegs. :)



"How are you?" is a greeting, not a question.  It took me a long time to realize that.  I used to waste a lot of brainpower trying to come up with suitable answers to that question before it finally became clear to me that, unless the person was a very close friend, "Fine" ( or some variation thereof) was the only suitable answer.
 
2013-06-19 04:45:21 PM

Loaf's Tray: omeganuepsilon: Since X is doing what Y cannot or will not, Y is compelled to make up for that shortcoming by saying "Thanks", implying that X went way out of his way and did a lot of work at the bidding of Y.

The natural response to that is to say, "You're welcome, but it was no problem, you didn't put me out in the slightest." to equalize that power struggle.

That's pretty much what I came in to say - I'm guilty of the "no problem" reply, but as I think about it now, I really only do it as a gesture of humility when somebody seems overly grateful for something that really took no toll on me to provide, like giving away a piece of furniture that I was going to throw out anyway or something; subconsciously it's like I'm simply turning down a mistakenly awarded badge of kindness, not being dismissive of someone's gratitude.


Yeah, it gets complicated.  Some people it's a display of power, some embarrass you by being overly gratuitous.  that's the problem with simply teaching kids to respond by rote, and a lot of "proper manners" in general, is because it leads to miscommunication or a misunderstanding of the world.

A cheery attitude like that can make others feel uncomfortable.  "Oh, you brought me a coke from the back, thank you soooooo much, I'm going to name my firstborn after you, and then sacrifice him so that you may live forever".

(ok, so I ran with it).  But you get the point.  The person blows it so out of porportion because they're in a good mood, that their intent, good as it may be, makes you think less of them, or feel embarassed for them, so you try to calm them.  It was nothing.

Or you know you didn't really earn the praise and that makes you feel uncomfortable.  It really was no problem.

That kind of empathy and confusion is a lot more common than we tend to realize in little every day interactions.  Hell, thinking about them may make it worse.  Sometimes you just go with the flow, but you know that only simply responding by rote/habit is going to be looked upon badly too(uncreative dolt!...so blah...he sure doesn't sound happy to work here....etc)

That's how things like "no problemo" catch on.  I almost always say "Not a problem, enjoy your X" in an upbeat tone, even if I don't feel like it.(unless the person is an asshole and I just can't bring myself to be kind whatsoever).  But for everyone else, it can do wonders to perk them up, to change their attitude.

It's funny, I'm usually the quiet guy.  When I do speak people tend to listen though, not because it's rare or even what I say, but because of how I speak.(and it's seriously not reflected here on fark in text).  I deliver mood.

Meh.  I also worked in a service industry for a while, but I spent a lot of time making friends and partying when I was in the service.  I tend to study people a lot and gauge reactions and learn my way around.  I'm not a manipulator by choice, it just flows naturally(not to the ends of greed, just to get everyone to lighten up).  I catch myself doing it and try to stop, that's when I get akward.

I didn't actually read the article here, but this guy sounds like he thought about it too much and upset himself.

If anything, it's the "you're welcome" that is out of place. As someone mentioned above, it's rooted in a traveling sort of sense, response to a greeting.
Traveller: "Hello"
Villager: " Hello, you are welcome here. Make yourself at home."

In a sense, our desire to make people feel at ease has bled over into using the word in a different manner.

Can't say wrong, per se, but it's interesting to see things that have drifted from their origins like that, especially when you see some zealot like in FTA talk about how it's supposed to be that way.

/long targetless rambling
//my bad
 
2013-06-19 04:48:33 PM

burning_bridge: vbob: [img.fark.net image 351x469]

.. reference may be too vague for those born after 1980

The one he posted today was also very relevant to this editorial.  I think Plato had a rant similar to this guy at some point.



If you're referring to the quote I think you are, it wasn't by Plato but is often misattributed to him, or to Socrates (who didn't write it either).  It may be from The Clouds by Aristophanes.

You might also want to take a look at The Way We Never Were.  If you have time, of course.
 
2013-06-19 04:52:35 PM

Pants full of macaroni!!: I have a tendency to reply to "How's it goin'?" with "It's goin'" and to "How you doin'?" with "I'm doin'".

/and it seems to be spreading to my coworkers


When someone asks me whats up I often describe my current obvious situation and actions.   In this case I am participating in an online discussion and pressing the submit button after i finish typing this.
 
2013-06-19 04:53:08 PM
1974. No problem, no worries. You're welcome? That's what my dad says.
 
2013-06-19 04:59:01 PM

wallywam1: FTGodWin: NkThrasher: Everyone has their stupid grammar peeves.  ...

Mine is people who get all bent out of shape believing that words have distinct meanings.

I'm like, duuuuuuude, they're ALL MADE UP. GET OVER IT!

I remember noting back in 5th grade English, that there is nothing coherent in the rules about grammar or word usage. Every freakin' day was merely learning yet another exception to some "rule."

My fourth grade teacher would go off when people said "ain't". She would say, "That word is a contraction. Are you trying to say 'ai not'?"

It didn't occur to me at the time that the word "won't", by her logic, would mean "wo not". If I ever invent a time machine, my first priority will be to go back and deliver a nice zinger. Then may I'll go back and kill Hitler or something.



Strictly speaking, ain't IS a contraction, but a  diachronic contraction of multiple different expressions (such as "am not" and "is not").

Also speaking of weird contractions, "aren't" can be a contraction of "am not" (via amn't, which still exists in some dialects of English) as well as "are not," which is why "Aren't I your friend?" is grammatically correct.
 
2013-06-19 05:06:07 PM

my lip balm addiction: frepnog: i am bringing back "groovy".

Peachy keen!


You're both hoopy froods.
 
2013-06-19 05:11:23 PM
It was the generations before 1980 that spread 'No Problem'
It was what we said when we were asked if we could build something, invent something, accomplish a difficult task, fight for the right of freedom
Its the newer ones that could only answer, "probably not, I'm too tired"
So they cheapened 'no problem' into a lazy way of showing cratitude to others
 
2013-06-19 05:12:26 PM

Secret Agent X23: ciberido: Do you have the same objection to "I'm good" to mean "I don't need anything" or "No, thank you"?

No. Totally different, as you would probably infer from my above explanation.


Fair enough.  I feared you might be one of those smug adjective/adverb folks who think they're smarter than everyone else but don't understand that "to be" is a copulative verb.

Not that there's anything wrong with not understanding that "to be" is a copulative verb.  It's just wrong to misunderstand copulative verbs AND criticize other people's grammar.  Which you weren't doing, so we're cool.
 
2013-06-19 05:18:16 PM

OwnTheRide: Not reading the bajillion comments, but


Then why should we read yours?
 
2013-06-19 05:24:31 PM
Perhaps it's because we started to learn Spanish and the you're welcome response is, de nada? Sometimes, nada problemo.
 
2013-06-19 05:25:42 PM

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: "No problem" means the same damn thing as "you're welcome". Let's focus on real issues, like people who misuse "anymore" and"begs the question".


And saying "anyways" when they mean "anyway." Drives me up the farking wall.
 
2013-06-19 05:27:32 PM
In the early '70s, my father started saying "no biggie" all the time. I hated it, and I was a kid at the time.
 
2013-06-19 05:34:01 PM

Gunny Highway: Huck And Molly Ziegler: If someone says "no problem" to me, I take that literally.
That means, to cite one of the examples, if you say "no problem" to lending me $10,000, then I will ask you for money again and again until you reply with something more plausible, like, "Well, it was a little strain on the budget, but you've been a great friend over the years, so I was happy to have the chance to help you out."

Really?  That is how you would interpret "No problem" in that situation?  Really?


Taken literally, I think the interpretation has validity, as in, "It was not a problem for me to lend you money." If someone says it's not a problem, I could (in a dickish mood) take it to mean it's an acceptable operating procedure, one which can be repeated without causing hardship.

Of course, the realities of interpersonal interaction are more complex.
 
2013-06-19 05:34:31 PM

ciberido: Secret Agent X23: ciberido: Do you have the same objection to "I'm good" to mean "I don't need anything" or "No, thank you"?

No. Totally different, as you would probably infer from my above explanation.

Fair enough.  I feared you might be one of those smug adjective/adverb folks who think they're smarter than everyone else but don't understand that "to be" is a copulative verb.

Not that there's anything wrong with not understanding that "to be" is a copulative verb.  It's just wrong to misunderstand copulative verbs AND criticize other people's grammar.  Which you weren't doing, so we're cool.


Well, I earn a large portion of my income these days by doing copyediting work. So my livelihood sort of depends on understanding stuff like that (as well as hoping other people continue not to). If someone writes, "I'm good," there's no problem (see what I did there?) unless it's in reference to the person's state of health. But if someone writes "I felt badly" (as they so often do), I'm changing that sucker to "bad" unless it's in reference to a defective sense of touch.
 
2013-06-19 05:40:15 PM

SoupJohnB: vpb: Those young whipper snappers need to start talking like we did back in the day and then get off of my lawn!

I called my own father-in-law "Sir."  Now my son-in-law calls me "Dude."  Which is ok by me.

/nobody calls me "Mr. Lebowski," man


My own daughter calls me "dude" and I'm her mother!

/it doesn't bother me
//as long as she calls me, it's all good
 
2013-06-19 05:41:09 PM
I respond with "no problem", "welcome", or "sure". In text-based discussions I will also use "no worries".
 
2013-06-19 05:42:48 PM

UrukHaiGuyz: DemDave: ko_kyi: I go with "My pleasure."

That's usually where I go, too. But if you're going to split hairs to the extent of the author, then we shouldn't use it, either.

Is it really a pleasure to go fetch a customer a glass of water? No.  It's no more a pleasure for you to do it as it is a problem for you to do it.

It creeps me the f*ck out that Chick-fil-A employees are required to say this.


It creeps me the fark out that you people know what Chick-fil-A employees say.
 
2013-06-19 06:07:03 PM
"I'm on it."

My #1 response to any question I'm asked at work.
 
2013-06-19 06:07:55 PM

ciberido: Sorry, you're wrong here.

The genitive does not always indicate strict possession, but rather a general sense of belonging or close identification with.
     his train (as in "If Bob doesn't get to the station in ten minutes he's going to miss his train")
     Here, Bob most likely does not own the train and instead ''his train'' means ''the train Bob plans to travel on.''

However, if the idea interests you, I suggest the short story "Grammar Lesson" from The Draco Tavern by Larry Niven.  An alien race has a language in which "my hand" and "my brother" use different determiners in a manner which seems to be what you're driving at.


Whether or not grammar rules support me isn't really relevant to it being a peeve of mine.  To me it really boils down to it sounding like market speak, implying possession of something that doesn't yet exist (both the physical diploma and the abstract conception of the degree), as if on day one of attending college your degree exists and you have it already.   The degree and diploma do not exist yet, you do not have them, you have not completed what is required to qualify for them, you cannot claim them to be yours on a resume, you should not be referring to them as if they were yours already.

This started when I was in the Army and people would talk about how they were "going to get their stripes" as if the rank was already theirs and the universe just hadn't realized it yet. "I'm sure I'll get my stripes next month" instead of "I'm sure I'll get promoted next month".  One implies that these 'stripes' that represent rank exist and are truly yours, just for some reason you haven't yet been given them yet, the other implies a belief that an action will occur.
 
2013-06-19 06:08:47 PM

Mike Chewbacca: mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?

I'm pretty sure our society consideres "you guys" to be a gender-neutral phrase.


Yup, because English lacks a good second person pronoun. Well, we actually have a very good one, but ya'll laugh at us southerners when we use it.
 
2013-06-19 06:15:18 PM

Bell's Boy: I prefer "No worries" to either. As far as "No problem" goes, I think it goes back to Ah-nold in Terminator 2.


I'm watching T2 right now, so I'm getting a kick...
 
2013-06-19 06:21:14 PM
Why would you say "No problem?" If it wasn't a problem, then I wouldn't have asked for your help. Arrogant douches.
 
2013-06-19 06:25:50 PM
I've always preferred:

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-19 06:30:20 PM

hundreddollarman: Why would you say "No problem?" If it wasn't a problem, then I wouldn't have asked for your help. Arrogant douches.


It's your problem, not theirs.  It was obviously no problem for them to help solve your problem.
 
2013-06-19 06:33:14 PM
As long as we're scooching youngsters off our lawns:

"Back in the day" - Which day was that? Oh, you mean the old days? Why didn't you just say "Back in the old days"?
 
2013-06-19 06:36:16 PM

gadian: hundreddollarman: Why would you say "No problem?" If it wasn't a problem, then I wouldn't have asked for your help. Arrogant douches.

It's your problem, not theirs.  It was obviously no problem for them to help solve your problem.


Perhaps. But it seems like a condescending way for them to say it. It reeks of "Hey, you're struggling with something that you shouldn't have been. What a rube. Let me assist you." Just a pet peeve of mine.
 
2013-06-19 06:42:56 PM
 
2013-06-19 06:46:24 PM

ciberido: Aidan: Fuggin Bizzy: Pants full of macaroni!!: I have a tendency to reply to "How's it goin'?" with "It's goin'" and to "How you doin'?" with "I'm doin'".

So do I. And then I invariably get "Just 'going'? Not going well?" or some similar idiocy. And then I invariably get stabby: I'm busy, and you don't actually care, so STFU already...

One summer I was doing some filing in an office that had a couple salesweasels in addition to the usual staff. One of them breezed in one day and said "Hey how're you?" and I, thinking myself quite clever, said, "Pretty terrible." I smiled at him smugly, waiting for him to realize how smart I was and how dumb his question was, and he said "Great!" and breezed out. He hadn't heard a thing I said. That took me down a couple pegs. :)


"How are you?" is a greeting, not a question.  It took me a long time to realize that.  I used to waste a lot of brainpower trying to come up with suitable answers to that question before it finally became clear to me that, unless the person was a very close friend, "Fine" ( or some variation thereof) was the only suitable answer.


I'd like to ban "What's the good word?" and "What do you know?" I'm nearly 40 and I still have no idea to respond to those. I usually end up mumbling something like "Um...good?"
 
2013-06-19 06:49:12 PM

NkThrasher: You have no relationship to that degree until you complete its requirements.


This is wrong on its face. Go away; you're wasting my time.
 
2013-06-19 06:56:18 PM

NkThrasher: ciberido: Sorry, you're wrong here.

The genitive does not always indicate strict possession, but rather a general sense of belonging or close identification with.
     his train (as in "If Bob doesn't get to the station in ten minutes he's going to miss his train")
     Here, Bob most likely does not own the train and instead ''his train'' means ''the train Bob plans to travel on.''

However, if the idea interests you, I suggest the short story "Grammar Lesson" from The Draco Tavern by Larry Niven.  An alien race has a language in which "my hand" and "my brother" use different determiners in a manner which seems to be what you're driving at.

Whether or not grammar rules support me isn't really relevant to it being a peeve of mine.


That's fine.  I thought you were trying to do the Grammar Nazi "This is what the expression REALLY means!" thing.  Just so we're clear that you're wrong in every possible way except that there is one person in the universe who agrees with you.  If that's all that matters to you, great.


NkThrasherOne implies that these 'stripes' that represent rank exist and are truly yours, just for some reason you haven't yet been given them yet, the other implies a belief that an action will occur.

See, again you seem to be confusing "This is how I feel even if nobody else in the world sees it the same way" with "This is what these words REALLY mean."  You can go with whichever you like, I suppose, but it would be nice if you could be consistent.
 
2013-06-19 07:18:37 PM

James F. Campbell: This is wrong on its face. Go away; you're wasting my time.


I was unaware that posting in a thread somehow demanded your attention and thus caused you to waste time.  Feel free to not respond to me if you feel that you are not going to gain benefit from the exercise.  But don't act as if it is my fault that you are "wasting" that time.

ciberido: See, again you seem to be confusing "This is how I feel even if nobody else in the world sees it the same way" with "This is what these words REALLY mean."  You can go with whichever you like, I suppose, but it would be nice if you could be consistent.


So using the Army example, promotion papers typically get signed on the first of the month and you get 'pinned' some time following that date, typically within a week or two.  Before the paperwork is signed and you have a pending real promotion you have no 'stripes' to be related to, so I object to using possessive language towards them.  Before my paperwork was signed there were no stripes for me, there was no 'Sergeant' Thrasher, there was 'Specialist' Thrasher.  If I referred to 'my stripes' I was referring to at best my aspirations towards those stripes or the potential for those stripes to exist.  In either case, I was referring to something that was not yet mine as if it were.

After the paperwork was signed and I truly was just pending a ceremony where I received them then in essence stripes did exist for me.  Saying "I get my stripes next Monday" would be appropriate, stripes are actually bound for me.  The physical insignia of the rank and the abstract things that come along with it such as responsibility etc actually exist in some capacity and are truly going to happen.  I am referring to something that is mine pending arrival.

Likewise when a student is at a university taking classes they have no degree, no diploma.  No degree or diploma exists for them.  When they're done with all their course work and have completed the paperwork to receive their (intentional possessive that time) diploma and degree then they have crossed that boundary from "potential" to "real and pending".

Note nowhere am I arguing that this is grammatically *incorrect*, structures can certainly exist to support cases that are inappropriate, but I am arguing that it *shouldn't* be said that way because it frames a statement with possession that doesn't exist.
 
2013-06-19 07:19:39 PM

Rapmaster2000: And another thing, consarnit!  Why don't young people say "consarnit" anymore?


Homer told us to stop using 1920's speak. Dagnabit.
 
2013-06-19 07:26:48 PM
It's indirectly from the Spanish "de nada" and French "de rien" that means helping you is literally nothing, I enjoy it and I'd do it again, you soulless dick.

//no problemo
//pas de probleme
 
2013-06-19 07:29:39 PM

RodneyToady: I think of "no problem" as more of a shorthand for "fulfilling your request was not a major inconvenience for me."  Which, by default, makes "You're welcome" more along the lines of, "I acknowledge your acknowledgement that what I did for you should make you feel grateful for my effort."


No, "you're welcome" means "you're welcome to continue asking for my damned help" and not your made up silly non-literal translation of it
 
2013-06-19 07:31:27 PM
Born in 1960, still often say "no sweat", you got a problem with that I can leave you to deal with your problems yourself you jerk.
 
2013-06-19 07:33:19 PM
whitsblog.com
 
2013-06-19 08:15:02 PM
To Mr. Bill Flanagan, I say "No problem"  and you'll get over it.  Either that or you'll have an aneurysm when yet another phrase pops up that you don't like.  Just be lucky you got "No problem" instead of nothing at all.
 
2013-06-19 08:23:34 PM
FTFA:

When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?

Listen, today's young people: If you want to infuriate someone born before 1980, just keep telling him "No problem" when they ask you to do something that is most certainly NOT a problem."


Sooooooo... what about people born IN 1980.....?
 
2013-06-19 08:28:29 PM

LisaSimpson: FTFA:

When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?

Listen, today's young people: If you want to infuriate someone born before 1980, just keep telling him "No problem" when they ask you to do something that is most certainly NOT a problem."

Sooooooo... what about people born IN 1980.....?


The guy has a problem with "no problem."  You post would make his head explode.

Are you trying to kill the poor bastard, and put his wife out of her misery?
 
2013-06-19 08:30:41 PM

ten foiled hats: You post would make his head explode.


Here, let me help!

/YOUR
 
2013-06-19 09:00:48 PM
I ''no problem''ed a pair of hitchhikers last weekend.
They were thanking me for giving them a 2-mile lift into town.
They didn't mind my 'no problem' reply at all.

/and yes, I'm absolutely sure problem"ed is a word, despite what my spelchker says.
 
2013-06-19 10:46:34 PM
I was born WAY before 1980 and have no problem with people saying "no problem" instead of "You're welcome". Or "sure" or "my pleasure" or whatever phrase the farking author of the article wants to hear.

Author of the article is a farking idiot.
 
2013-06-20 12:38:07 AM
Well...huh. I was born in '77, so I must have been doing it before everyone else started.
 
2013-06-20 12:48:58 AM

bglove25: mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?

Because there's no single syllable slang term for women? Or at least that socially acceptable or polite.


Another Farker who's never even heard of girls.
 
2013-06-20 01:09:34 AM
I'm constantly confused by politeness in Hispanic culture. I work in a retail store that offers a free reward membership to customers. You know, you make purchases with the thing, it adds up points, and you get coupons at home and your email.

My confusion stems from conversing with Hispanic peoples:
Me: "Am I using your Rewards Card today?"
Them: "No."
Me: "Would you be interested in signing up for our free Rewards Program that earns you coupons in your email?"
Them: "It's okay."

"It's okay?"
As in, "Okay, yes I'm interested, why not?!"
or
"Naw, no thanks?"

If I'm looking right into the eyes of the person it seems like to me they may want to sign up, but ever so unenthusiastically so. But this answer is so generic I always have to specify, "Is that that yes?" because I can't be certain since their body language says no.

I guess these folks don't understand that a simple "No thanks" would be a lot more universally communicative?

I'm also bothered by people who don't clearly audibly respond to yes and no questions in my interactions with customers. If I'm not able to look at you, or am hard of hearing, or can't hear your squeek over the din of people and my damned store's muzak, YOU NEED TO SPEAK THE fark UP AND ENUNCIATE. I know I'm speaking loudly enough for a person to hear me 5 feet away but I can't converse with you if it means violating our respective personal spaces.
 
2013-06-20 01:18:40 AM
Here's another one:

Woman breaks her leg skiing.  You tell her, "I'm sorry."

She says, "For what, you didn't have anything to do with it."

This one bugs me.  It's an expression of sorrow as much as an apology.   This is one of those expressions that still gets used all of the time, but that person has arbitrarily decided that it cannot mean X anymore.

That is not how language works.  That's gay.

/another pet peeve along similar lines, when people try to own "gay" as a slander
//someone's always trying to make it into a hateful word even when it's not, even when it's usage is irrelevant
 
2013-06-20 03:20:16 AM
I like to say "sure thing"
 
2013-06-20 07:45:05 AM

bmfderek: unyon: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

The question is whether its polite at all.  I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.

/Canadian
//we're funny like that

When thanked, I often say, "Certainly."  Is that acceptable?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5j8Jioan1w
 
2013-06-20 10:30:09 AM

mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


The real answer is that depending on what restaurant you're going to, casual dining chain places train their servers to be folksy. After serving 1,000 tables, your server is on autopilot and has an unwritten script to interact with you. If it's any consolation, the server does not care what gender you are. You are simply a dollar sign - a means to an end.

The snarky answer is that it is indeed, not in any way okay. Indeed, it constitutes the greatest injustice since the Trail of Tears. You don't happen to be a female video game reviewer, do you?
 
2013-06-20 10:36:47 AM

Boxcutta: The real answer is that depending on what restaurant you're going to, casual dining chain places train their servers to be folksy. After serving 1,000 tables, your server is on autopilot and has an unwritten script to interact with you. If it's any consolation, the server does not care what gender you are. You are simply a dollar sign - a means to an end.

The snarky answer is that it is indeed, not in any way okay. Indeed, it constitutes the greatest injustice since the Trail of Tears. You don't happen to be a female video game reviewer, do you?


I'm female, but if the monsters heard you ask me about video games, they'd laugh themselves into a coma. (Hey...thanks for the idea!)

Not only did my family have one of the first (black-and-white) Pong games (hooked up to our new color TV, which I thought was a waste), but I remember the advent of PacMan, et al.

P.S.: Thanks for the non-snark.

/Old
//FYI for all you whippersnappers stomping around on my lawn: Tron nearly singlehandedly killed romance in the '80s: all the guys were hooked on playing the game and all of us women sat around waiting for them to get tired of it. Most of us got tired of the guys long before that occurred. (Yes, I know it's sexist. That's how the world was back then. As if it's changed now!)
 
2013-06-20 10:39:24 AM
How does this thread exist in a world where I have to endure being called "Chief," "Pal," "Boss," or "Big guy," by people in service industry? That's 1000 times worse than whatever grandpa blogger is prattling on about.

/"Have a good one."
 
2013-06-20 05:17:25 PM
NO PROBLEM

/u mad, geezers?
 
2013-06-20 06:56:17 PM
"Go fark yourself!"
-- 1973
 
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