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(CBS News)   "When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?"   (cbsnews.com) divider line 332
    More: Stupid, Taliban, virus  
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8876 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jun 2013 at 1:59 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-19 06:21:14 PM  
Why would you say "No problem?" If it wasn't a problem, then I wouldn't have asked for your help. Arrogant douches.
 
2013-06-19 06:25:50 PM  
I've always preferred:

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-19 06:30:20 PM  

hundreddollarman: Why would you say "No problem?" If it wasn't a problem, then I wouldn't have asked for your help. Arrogant douches.


It's your problem, not theirs.  It was obviously no problem for them to help solve your problem.
 
2013-06-19 06:33:14 PM  
As long as we're scooching youngsters off our lawns:

"Back in the day" - Which day was that? Oh, you mean the old days? Why didn't you just say "Back in the old days"?
 
2013-06-19 06:36:16 PM  

gadian: hundreddollarman: Why would you say "No problem?" If it wasn't a problem, then I wouldn't have asked for your help. Arrogant douches.

It's your problem, not theirs.  It was obviously no problem for them to help solve your problem.


Perhaps. But it seems like a condescending way for them to say it. It reeks of "Hey, you're struggling with something that you shouldn't have been. What a rube. Let me assist you." Just a pet peeve of mine.
 
2013-06-19 06:42:56 PM  
 
2013-06-19 06:46:24 PM  

ciberido: Aidan: Fuggin Bizzy: Pants full of macaroni!!: I have a tendency to reply to "How's it goin'?" with "It's goin'" and to "How you doin'?" with "I'm doin'".

So do I. And then I invariably get "Just 'going'? Not going well?" or some similar idiocy. And then I invariably get stabby: I'm busy, and you don't actually care, so STFU already...

One summer I was doing some filing in an office that had a couple salesweasels in addition to the usual staff. One of them breezed in one day and said "Hey how're you?" and I, thinking myself quite clever, said, "Pretty terrible." I smiled at him smugly, waiting for him to realize how smart I was and how dumb his question was, and he said "Great!" and breezed out. He hadn't heard a thing I said. That took me down a couple pegs. :)


"How are you?" is a greeting, not a question.  It took me a long time to realize that.  I used to waste a lot of brainpower trying to come up with suitable answers to that question before it finally became clear to me that, unless the person was a very close friend, "Fine" ( or some variation thereof) was the only suitable answer.


I'd like to ban "What's the good word?" and "What do you know?" I'm nearly 40 and I still have no idea to respond to those. I usually end up mumbling something like "Um...good?"
 
2013-06-19 06:49:12 PM  

NkThrasher: You have no relationship to that degree until you complete its requirements.


This is wrong on its face. Go away; you're wasting my time.
 
2013-06-19 06:56:18 PM  

NkThrasher: ciberido: Sorry, you're wrong here.

The genitive does not always indicate strict possession, but rather a general sense of belonging or close identification with.
     his train (as in "If Bob doesn't get to the station in ten minutes he's going to miss his train")
     Here, Bob most likely does not own the train and instead ''his train'' means ''the train Bob plans to travel on.''

However, if the idea interests you, I suggest the short story "Grammar Lesson" from The Draco Tavern by Larry Niven.  An alien race has a language in which "my hand" and "my brother" use different determiners in a manner which seems to be what you're driving at.

Whether or not grammar rules support me isn't really relevant to it being a peeve of mine.


That's fine.  I thought you were trying to do the Grammar Nazi "This is what the expression REALLY means!" thing.  Just so we're clear that you're wrong in every possible way except that there is one person in the universe who agrees with you.  If that's all that matters to you, great.


NkThrasherOne implies that these 'stripes' that represent rank exist and are truly yours, just for some reason you haven't yet been given them yet, the other implies a belief that an action will occur.

See, again you seem to be confusing "This is how I feel even if nobody else in the world sees it the same way" with "This is what these words REALLY mean."  You can go with whichever you like, I suppose, but it would be nice if you could be consistent.
 
2013-06-19 07:18:37 PM  

James F. Campbell: This is wrong on its face. Go away; you're wasting my time.


I was unaware that posting in a thread somehow demanded your attention and thus caused you to waste time.  Feel free to not respond to me if you feel that you are not going to gain benefit from the exercise.  But don't act as if it is my fault that you are "wasting" that time.

ciberido: See, again you seem to be confusing "This is how I feel even if nobody else in the world sees it the same way" with "This is what these words REALLY mean."  You can go with whichever you like, I suppose, but it would be nice if you could be consistent.


So using the Army example, promotion papers typically get signed on the first of the month and you get 'pinned' some time following that date, typically within a week or two.  Before the paperwork is signed and you have a pending real promotion you have no 'stripes' to be related to, so I object to using possessive language towards them.  Before my paperwork was signed there were no stripes for me, there was no 'Sergeant' Thrasher, there was 'Specialist' Thrasher.  If I referred to 'my stripes' I was referring to at best my aspirations towards those stripes or the potential for those stripes to exist.  In either case, I was referring to something that was not yet mine as if it were.

After the paperwork was signed and I truly was just pending a ceremony where I received them then in essence stripes did exist for me.  Saying "I get my stripes next Monday" would be appropriate, stripes are actually bound for me.  The physical insignia of the rank and the abstract things that come along with it such as responsibility etc actually exist in some capacity and are truly going to happen.  I am referring to something that is mine pending arrival.

Likewise when a student is at a university taking classes they have no degree, no diploma.  No degree or diploma exists for them.  When they're done with all their course work and have completed the paperwork to receive their (intentional possessive that time) diploma and degree then they have crossed that boundary from "potential" to "real and pending".

Note nowhere am I arguing that this is grammatically *incorrect*, structures can certainly exist to support cases that are inappropriate, but I am arguing that it *shouldn't* be said that way because it frames a statement with possession that doesn't exist.
 
2013-06-19 07:19:39 PM  

Rapmaster2000: And another thing, consarnit!  Why don't young people say "consarnit" anymore?


Homer told us to stop using 1920's speak. Dagnabit.
 
2013-06-19 07:26:48 PM  
It's indirectly from the Spanish "de nada" and French "de rien" that means helping you is literally nothing, I enjoy it and I'd do it again, you soulless dick.

//no problemo
//pas de probleme
 
2013-06-19 07:29:39 PM  

RodneyToady: I think of "no problem" as more of a shorthand for "fulfilling your request was not a major inconvenience for me."  Which, by default, makes "You're welcome" more along the lines of, "I acknowledge your acknowledgement that what I did for you should make you feel grateful for my effort."


No, "you're welcome" means "you're welcome to continue asking for my damned help" and not your made up silly non-literal translation of it
 
2013-06-19 07:31:27 PM  
Born in 1960, still often say "no sweat", you got a problem with that I can leave you to deal with your problems yourself you jerk.
 
2013-06-19 07:33:19 PM  
whitsblog.com
 
2013-06-19 08:15:02 PM  
To Mr. Bill Flanagan, I say "No problem"  and you'll get over it.  Either that or you'll have an aneurysm when yet another phrase pops up that you don't like.  Just be lucky you got "No problem" instead of nothing at all.
 
2013-06-19 08:23:34 PM  
FTFA:

When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?

Listen, today's young people: If you want to infuriate someone born before 1980, just keep telling him "No problem" when they ask you to do something that is most certainly NOT a problem."


Sooooooo... what about people born IN 1980.....?
 
2013-06-19 08:28:29 PM  

LisaSimpson: FTFA:

When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?

Listen, today's young people: If you want to infuriate someone born before 1980, just keep telling him "No problem" when they ask you to do something that is most certainly NOT a problem."

Sooooooo... what about people born IN 1980.....?


The guy has a problem with "no problem."  You post would make his head explode.

Are you trying to kill the poor bastard, and put his wife out of her misery?
 
2013-06-19 08:30:41 PM  

ten foiled hats: You post would make his head explode.


Here, let me help!

/YOUR
 
2013-06-19 09:00:48 PM  
I ''no problem''ed a pair of hitchhikers last weekend.
They were thanking me for giving them a 2-mile lift into town.
They didn't mind my 'no problem' reply at all.

/and yes, I'm absolutely sure problem"ed is a word, despite what my spelchker says.
 
2013-06-19 10:46:34 PM  
I was born WAY before 1980 and have no problem with people saying "no problem" instead of "You're welcome". Or "sure" or "my pleasure" or whatever phrase the farking author of the article wants to hear.

Author of the article is a farking idiot.
 
2013-06-20 12:38:07 AM  
Well...huh. I was born in '77, so I must have been doing it before everyone else started.
 
2013-06-20 12:48:58 AM  

bglove25: mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?

Because there's no single syllable slang term for women? Or at least that socially acceptable or polite.


Another Farker who's never even heard of girls.
 
2013-06-20 01:09:34 AM  
I'm constantly confused by politeness in Hispanic culture. I work in a retail store that offers a free reward membership to customers. You know, you make purchases with the thing, it adds up points, and you get coupons at home and your email.

My confusion stems from conversing with Hispanic peoples:
Me: "Am I using your Rewards Card today?"
Them: "No."
Me: "Would you be interested in signing up for our free Rewards Program that earns you coupons in your email?"
Them: "It's okay."

"It's okay?"
As in, "Okay, yes I'm interested, why not?!"
or
"Naw, no thanks?"

If I'm looking right into the eyes of the person it seems like to me they may want to sign up, but ever so unenthusiastically so. But this answer is so generic I always have to specify, "Is that that yes?" because I can't be certain since their body language says no.

I guess these folks don't understand that a simple "No thanks" would be a lot more universally communicative?

I'm also bothered by people who don't clearly audibly respond to yes and no questions in my interactions with customers. If I'm not able to look at you, or am hard of hearing, or can't hear your squeek over the din of people and my damned store's muzak, YOU NEED TO SPEAK THE fark UP AND ENUNCIATE. I know I'm speaking loudly enough for a person to hear me 5 feet away but I can't converse with you if it means violating our respective personal spaces.
 
2013-06-20 01:18:40 AM  
Here's another one:

Woman breaks her leg skiing.  You tell her, "I'm sorry."

She says, "For what, you didn't have anything to do with it."

This one bugs me.  It's an expression of sorrow as much as an apology.   This is one of those expressions that still gets used all of the time, but that person has arbitrarily decided that it cannot mean X anymore.

That is not how language works.  That's gay.

/another pet peeve along similar lines, when people try to own "gay" as a slander
//someone's always trying to make it into a hateful word even when it's not, even when it's usage is irrelevant
 
2013-06-20 03:20:16 AM  
I like to say "sure thing"
 
2013-06-20 07:45:05 AM  

bmfderek: unyon: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

The question is whether its polite at all.  I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.

/Canadian
//we're funny like that

When thanked, I often say, "Certainly."  Is that acceptable?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5j8Jioan1w
 
2013-06-20 10:30:09 AM  

mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


The real answer is that depending on what restaurant you're going to, casual dining chain places train their servers to be folksy. After serving 1,000 tables, your server is on autopilot and has an unwritten script to interact with you. If it's any consolation, the server does not care what gender you are. You are simply a dollar sign - a means to an end.

The snarky answer is that it is indeed, not in any way okay. Indeed, it constitutes the greatest injustice since the Trail of Tears. You don't happen to be a female video game reviewer, do you?
 
2013-06-20 10:36:47 AM  

Boxcutta: The real answer is that depending on what restaurant you're going to, casual dining chain places train their servers to be folksy. After serving 1,000 tables, your server is on autopilot and has an unwritten script to interact with you. If it's any consolation, the server does not care what gender you are. You are simply a dollar sign - a means to an end.

The snarky answer is that it is indeed, not in any way okay. Indeed, it constitutes the greatest injustice since the Trail of Tears. You don't happen to be a female video game reviewer, do you?


I'm female, but if the monsters heard you ask me about video games, they'd laugh themselves into a coma. (Hey...thanks for the idea!)

Not only did my family have one of the first (black-and-white) Pong games (hooked up to our new color TV, which I thought was a waste), but I remember the advent of PacMan, et al.

P.S.: Thanks for the non-snark.

/Old
//FYI for all you whippersnappers stomping around on my lawn: Tron nearly singlehandedly killed romance in the '80s: all the guys were hooked on playing the game and all of us women sat around waiting for them to get tired of it. Most of us got tired of the guys long before that occurred. (Yes, I know it's sexist. That's how the world was back then. As if it's changed now!)
 
2013-06-20 10:39:24 AM  
How does this thread exist in a world where I have to endure being called "Chief," "Pal," "Boss," or "Big guy," by people in service industry? That's 1000 times worse than whatever grandpa blogger is prattling on about.

/"Have a good one."
 
2013-06-20 05:17:25 PM  
NO PROBLEM

/u mad, geezers?
 
2013-06-20 06:56:17 PM  
"Go fark yourself!"
-- 1973
 
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