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(CBS News)   "When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?"   (cbsnews.com) divider line 332
    More: Stupid, Taliban, virus  
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8876 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jun 2013 at 1:59 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-19 02:16:54 PM  

ko_kyi: I go with "My pleasure."


That's usually where I go, too. But if you're going to split hairs to the extent of the author, then we shouldn't use it, either.

Is it really a pleasure to go fetch a customer a glass of water? No.  It's no more a pleasure for you to do it as it is a problem for you to do it.
 
2013-06-19 02:17:03 PM  

FrancoFile: I see it as a natural progression from "Not at all", to "Not a problem", to "No problem"

It's "pas de probleme" in French, too.


 Gecko Gingrich: I thought Andy Rooney was dead.

This


All languages have multiple ways of expressing English's "You're welcome".

French formal: Je vous en prie --
French informal: De rien (it's nothing)

The Spanish informal is "de nada" (it's nothing)

We don't really say "it's nothing" often in the US but it isn't completely alien either. As far as people saying "no problem" I think as a culture we've accepted it as "de rien" even though it sounds even less formal than that.
 
2013-06-19 02:17:15 PM  
I'm 30, but I distinctly remember being under 12 years old, and when people would thank me, I would usually say "no problem", instead of you're welcome.  I remember it was instinctive and I would always think to myself "that may have sounded rude, why didn't you say 'you're welcome'?"  But it's something I've done my whole life, and I really have no clue how it started.
 
2013-06-19 02:17:24 PM  
Old guy pissed about the evolution of language? No problem! He'll be forced to retire by us 1980er's eventually.
 
2013-06-19 02:17:29 PM  
In other news, regional dialects vary by region...
 
2013-06-19 02:17:52 PM  
In spanish the correct response to "Gracias" (thank you) is "de nada" (it was nothing)
 
2013-06-19 02:17:57 PM  

vpb: Those young whipper snappers need to start talking like we did back in the day and then get off of my lawn!


I called my own father-in-law "Sir."  Now my son-in-law calls me "Dude."  Which is ok by me.

/nobody calls me "Mr. Lebowski," man
 
2013-06-19 02:18:08 PM  
And in other news
old people are old
frank stallone and more after matlock
 
2013-06-19 02:18:50 PM  
The author of TFA, or "writer with a deadline & sand in his shorts who decided to post pointless, inflammatory rant to generate views & comments on CBS News, thus justifying his continued employment".
 
2013-06-19 02:19:03 PM  

Gecko Gingrich: I thought Andy Rooney was dead.


Having read the piece, I know he is.
 
2013-06-19 02:19:10 PM  
i am bringing back "groovy".

/ewj
 
2013-06-19 02:19:17 PM  

ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.


Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?
 
2013-06-19 02:20:00 PM  

exick: When did everyone born after 1980 decide that "No problem" was interchangeable with "You're welcome"? Who spread that virus? The Taliban?

Listen, today's young people: If you want to infuriate someone born before 1980, just keep telling him "No problem" when they ask you to do something that is most certainly NOT a problem.

I don't understand how these two things are related. The first is a different response to being thanked, the second is affirmation that you understand the instruction and are willing to do as asked. I find it hard to believe that an author would be so enraged by colloquial English niceties that may have drifted past their origins and are no longer meant literally. Does this person expect to be peppered with an inventory of things that exist over the head of the person that he may say "What's up?" to? Of course not, because who walks around with pepper in their pockets all the time?


I think his issue maybe with the the subtle agency implied by the answer. "Ok" is simple acquiescence, "Yes sir" is deferential, but "No problem" implies that the person answering has thought about it and decided they were willing to do what you've asked them. Implicit in "no problem" is the chance they may find your demands to be a problem and not do them, and I guess this guy is one of those petty tyrants who finds the idea that those working for him might be making their own decisions independent of his will threatening. It's like people who get offended when someone uses "man" or "pal" instead of "sir" because they imply a position of equality.
 
2013-06-19 02:20:19 PM  

unyon: Aarontology: SOMEONE IS BEING POLITE IN A WAY DIFFERENT THAN HOW I EXPRESS POLITENESS.

The question is whether its polite at all.  I don't think 'uh huh' is a reasonable substitute for "you're welcome" either.

/Canadian
//we're funny like that


And I would sometimes say that too "uh huh" or a "yep", instead of a you're welcome.  Not sure why I would say that as a child with no preconditioning, but it would come out.  I was just as sincere in my expression as if I were to have said "you're welcome", but it obviously doesn't come across as me being just as polite.
 
2013-06-19 02:20:46 PM  

DemDave: ko_kyi: I go with "My pleasure."

That's usually where I go, too. But if you're going to split hairs to the extent of the author, then we shouldn't use it, either.

Is it really a pleasure to go fetch a customer a glass of water? No.  It's no more a pleasure for you to do it as it is a problem for you to do it.


It creeps me the f*ck out that Chick-fil-A employees are required to say this.
 
2013-06-19 02:20:47 PM  
jpegy.com
 
2013-06-19 02:20:55 PM  

Heron: I think his issue may be with the the subtle agency implied by the answer.


Bah. FTFM :/
 
2013-06-19 02:20:56 PM  
When playing Baldur's Gate, I chose the male voice set who occasionally complied with commands by stating "Not a problem"; I developed the habit of using the same phrase myself. Perhaps I was unaware of the inherent rudeness of the phrase due to having it applied to a Paladin.
 
2013-06-19 02:21:37 PM  
By Grabthar's hammer, by the suns of Warvan, it shall be done!
 
2013-06-19 02:21:39 PM  
I was born before 1980, but that's no problem.
 
2013-06-19 02:21:48 PM  
img.fark.net

.. reference may be too vague for those born after 1980
 
2013-06-19 02:22:09 PM  
i use "you're welcome" when i deliberately approach somebody who needs help with something

i use "no problem" if somebody needed unexpected help
 
2013-06-19 02:22:33 PM  

Honest Geologist: What I find myself doing, and it irritates me that I do it, is saying "no, thank you." Or something like that.

/also Canadian


Ah is that where it comes from? Figures.

I find unlearning the knee-jerk "sorry" is the hardest part of sounding American. It's like verbal wallpaper. You really don't notice you're doing it until someone points it out (repeatedly).
 
2013-06-19 02:22:55 PM  
After 1980?  I was born in '72 and this has been a common phrase since my childhood.  As far as the phrase goes, I have no problem with it.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:02 PM  

ferretman: 'My bad'


Yeah, the first time I heard this I realized I was getting older.

English 50 years from now will be very weird.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:17 PM  

ko_kyi: I go with "My pleasure."



If I ever buy a boat, that's what I'm going to name it.

/Or maybe Frank Sobotka's Revenge.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-06-19 02:23:40 PM  
when he goes to Pittsburgh and everyone says "Have a good one" he must go ballistic.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:40 PM  

mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


Because women are equal to men.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:53 PM  

Yogimus: In other news, regional dialects vary by region...


That doesn't stop people from complaining about "doing the needful".  I mean I get the complaints when it's used to inject ambiguity and reflect laziness on the part of the asker like "please advise" does, but it's still a retarded thing people feel excessively strongly about.
 
2013-06-19 02:23:53 PM  
So what's the deal now?  Websites just look for other articles a few months back, shuffle the words around a little, and repeat them back?
 
2013-06-19 02:24:01 PM  

UrukHaiGuyz: It creeps me the f*ck out that Chick-fil-A employees are required to say this.


It must have come about recently, for in my halcyon days as a high-school and college-aged youth working at a Chick-Fil-A, this never came up in the training and was never stressed by the managers or operator.
 
2013-06-19 02:24:10 PM  

Rapmaster2000: If you want to get good tips or just generally not infuriate older people

That can be simplified:  if you want to get good tips, do not wait on older people.



THIS.

"O, here is a nice shiny new quarter."
Thanks.  Your drink cost $3 and your meal was $15, thanks for the 1.3% tip gramps.  You keep it, you might have to make a call using a 'phone booth' whatever the hell that is...
 
2013-06-19 02:24:16 PM  
^ born in 1962.

*adjusts onion on belt*

I have no problem with no problem.  Never had a problem with no problem.

author is giving all us geezers a bad name
 
2013-06-19 02:24:56 PM  

ferretman: 'My bad'


I see that Bob Knight is in the house.

How someone can take that phrase ("it was my fault") and believe it's the complete opposite is beyond me. Then again, he is seemingly turning into the quintessential angry old man.
 
2013-06-19 02:25:16 PM  
What happens if I say it periodically to acquaintances and I was born before 1970 ???
 
2013-06-19 02:25:36 PM  
Unlike many here, I appreciate how the response "no problem" can be offensive.

That is why I interchange it with "biatch, Please!"
 
2013-06-19 02:25:57 PM  
"You're welcome" implies that you're welcome to impose upon me again.

"No problem" implies "this time, but don't make a habit of it."
 
2013-06-19 02:26:25 PM  

mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


I'm pretty sure our society consideres "you guys" to be a gender-neutral phrase.
 
2013-06-19 02:26:50 PM  

DirkNiggla: Rapmaster2000: If you want to get good tips or just generally not infuriate older people

That can be simplified:  if you want to get good tips, do not wait on older people.


THIS.

"O, here is a nice shiny new quarter."
Thanks.  Your drink cost $3 and your meal was $15, thanks for the 1.3% tip gramps.  You keep it, you might have to make a call using a 'phone booth' whatever the hell that is...


Your wages are a concern of you and your employer. Don't look to me to be a part of that.
 
2013-06-19 02:26:54 PM  
I love how an EVP at MTV is concerned about a dumbed down generation of youth. Perhaps you should pay better attention to your programming content than worrying about modern vernacular.
 
2013-06-19 02:27:21 PM  

mama2tnt: ikanreed: "'No problem' communicates there was a problem but 'you're welcome' in no way implies its opposite by being said"
--old idiot, so afraid of change that replacing a no-meaning conversation filling phrase with another no-meaning conversation-filling phrase is the biggest deal

When people say "no problem" they aren't aware that this old man is a problem.

Hate it when servers call everyone at my table "You guys" when we're all female. Why is this okay?


Because not everyone is as dependent on gender validation as you.

"Acknowledge my gender, working class peon, for it is all that matters in social interactionsI am here to be called female, not receive food."

alternatively

"I AM MY VAGINA!"
 
2013-06-19 02:28:00 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: De nada


See? Pat Buchanan was right!
 
2013-06-19 02:28:38 PM  

freeforever: "No problem" is just another way of saying "Glad to help; no sweat off my back."  It shouldn't be offensive and is a kind reply if not as formal as "You're welcome."  What grinds my gears is when someone replies "Yep."  What does "Yep" mean?


"Yep" is just another way of saying "Glad to help; no sweat off my back."  It shouldn't be offensive and is a kind reply if not as formal as "You're welcome."
 
2013-06-19 02:29:02 PM  

NkThrasher: Everyone has their stupid grammar peeves.  Not everyone writes inane articles about them.  Most people just post them in threads about the inane articles.

"I'm going to school to get my degree!"

Really, *YOUR* degree?  it's sitting there with your name on it right now?  oh it won't be printed until a few days before you graduate?  So you're really going to school to get *A* degree that you will have a claim for possession of after you have earned it?

Or even worse.

"I'm going to school to earn my degree!"

So you already have a degree that you somehow didn't earn but are now in the act of earning?

/hates marketing speak


I believe you're actually incorrect on this. A degree is a rank or a title. A Diploma is what you receive granting you use of the title.This is why a degree is "conferred upon" you. Your diploma attests this specifically to you.  So earning "your" degree is correct.
 
2013-06-19 02:29:03 PM  

SheltemDragon: R.A.Danny: Why do we thank people for providing service for pay anyway? They should be thanking us for the money.

Nice troll, short, sweet, channeling just enough Reservoir Dogs without being a blatant ripoff. 8/10

In answer to your question, in case its not a troll, is that it is recognition that they just performed a service for you, even if you paid money for it. And that service was likely at a wage to them that was below its value to you.

/so good that I had to bite anyway.
//splash splash splash


I still think that if someone does something for profit and I pay for it they should thank me. Is that all that old fashioned? That goes for the pretty young lady at Starbucks to my Cisco rep who just got a $235,000 PO from me.
 
2013-06-19 02:29:18 PM  
www.peolpstar.com
 
2013-06-19 02:29:23 PM  
No worries.

What are you fakring Austrian?  Throw another shrimp on the barbie!  No Worries, mate.
 
2013-06-19 02:29:39 PM  

jbc: Someone should wish him "Happy Holidays" and watch him go postal.


The jews started that one.
 
2013-06-19 02:29:50 PM  
I was born in 1955 and I have no problem with it. Subby should ease up on his grammatical OCD.
 
2013-06-19 02:30:17 PM  
What I say instead:

25.media.tumblr.com
 
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